We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Corydalis 2018  (Read 838 times)

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12398
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Corydalis 2018
« on: March 21, 2018, 09:03:33 PM »
My Corydalis had nicely started to come into flower just before the 'Beast from the East' dropped a load of snow on them, and just as they had recovered from that a further dump of snow hit them last weekend whilst we were away in The Homeland. So these are not really at their best.

Corydalis solida 'Beth Evans'609297-0

Corydalis cava609299-1

Corydalis solida 'Dieter Schacht'609301-2


David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Jacek

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 181
  • Country: pl
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2018, 11:16:33 PM »
David, I wouldn't be so critical - they just look nice. Mine are only showing noses.
Jacek, Poland, USDA zone 6, lowland borderline continental/maritime climate.
Hobby woodland gardening

Mariette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
  • Country: de
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2018, 08:06:38 PM »
Iīd rather say Your Coydalis put up a big show, David!

This isnīt something one would say of Corydalis pumila, which is in flower right now here in Sweden. The flowering lasts only for 2-3 days. Maybe thatīs one of the reasons why the Swedish colloquial name means Good-For-Nothing-Corydalis. It cannot be mistaken due to itīs typical bracts.

Mariette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
  • Country: de
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2018, 08:12:29 PM »
Whereas Corydalis pumila is rare in Sweden, Corydalis cava is one of the two usually found. Here it grows together with hepatica, unfortunately not so lovely blue as Your C. cava.

Mariette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
  • Country: de
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2018, 08:17:02 PM »
The other Corydalis more often found in Sweden is Corydalis intermedia - the lower bracts are splitted, the upper ones not.

Mariette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
  • Country: de
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2018, 08:21:43 PM »
Back home in Germany, the Corydalis will be withered by now. This year was C. solida īBlue Giantīone of my favourites.

Mariette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
  • Country: de
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2018, 08:26:00 PM »
In Germany, more and more pinkish Corydalis malkensis are reported, supposed to be hybrids with C. solida. One I got from a friend, this one popped up in my garden last year.

Jacek

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 181
  • Country: pl
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2018, 07:53:22 PM »
I'd like to offer fresh Corydalis nobilis seeds to anyone who wish to have it. It is in full bloom now but as temperatures are reaching +30 C, so it will be ready to shed seeds very soon. I will send it in small plastic bags with some soil added to retain moisture, in envelope, as a letter. I have practiced this with one of the forumists and it worked very well. I already have one order this year.

I do not really expect anything for exchange, so do not hesitate and order. But I am happily collecting genus corydalis and I have in profusion: Pseudofumaria lutea and ochroleuca and Corydalis: solida in pink, red and ordinary purple shades, malkensis, cava (white and purple), cheilanthifolia. All others are either struggling to survive or not producing seeds for whatever reason (like C. bushii, C. flexuosa, C. ellipticarpa) - and are prone to die one summer or winter when the weather is too aggressive. So if you have surplus of anything that I don't have - I will be happy. My garden conditions may be good enough for some easier steppelanders, too.

Just a word of warning. C. nobilis is a big plant, not good for a rock garden. It is good for more abandoned places, in a forest or under shrubs. It will out compete small spring plants except those very early ones with short growing season, like C. solida or Galanthus nivalis. I find it very drought resistant and shade tolerant. It's doing reasonably well in bright spots, too. I do not have experience with it in hot and dry spots. It is probably more decorative in cold/cool climates - my plants do not look as good as those from Scandinavia. It does self seed abundantly and fast in shedding seeds. It is not a self-cleaning plant like C. slide - it dies slowly at the end of spring. It is fairly difficult to transplant as the perennial underground portion resembles branching carrot. It is long-lived in my garden.

If you want it, just send a message to me, with address.
Jacek, Poland, USDA zone 6, lowland borderline continental/maritime climate.
Hobby woodland gardening

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12398
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2018, 07:52:06 PM »
A couple of blue Corydalis from the garden today:-

Corydalis 'Spinners' ------- a bit of a scrambler.
617253-0

617255-1

Corydalis 'Wildside Blue'
617257-2

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 39703
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2018, 08:20:58 PM »
I see the bees have been chewing their way into the flowers to pinch the nectar!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12398
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2018, 08:24:04 PM »
... and not one of them buzzed me to see if it was OK ::)
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12398
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2018, 08:44:52 PM »
Corydalis 'Craigton Blue' 

618420-0

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Leena

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1304
  • Country: fi
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2018, 08:15:02 AM »
David, is 'Spinners' earlier for you than other blue corydalis like 'Craigton Blue'?
Leena from south of Finland

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12398
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2018, 07:09:21 PM »
David, is 'Spinners' earlier for you than other blue corydalis like 'Craigton Blue'?

It's earlier than some Leena but later than others. In my garden 'Blue Heron' is always first and regardless of the bad weather this year was in flower in March. It's taking a break at the moment but I expect it to have another flush of flowers in late-Summer, early-Autumn. 'Blue Dragon is usually next, followed by 'Spinners'. Then 'Wildside Blue' followed by 'Craigton Blue' and elata should be in flower later this week. I also have 'Hale Cat' which I nearly lost but managed to save a small cutting but it never seems to grow.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Leena

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1304
  • Country: fi
Re: Corydalis 2018
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2018, 03:23:02 PM »
Thank you David!  :) I planted 'Spinners' last year and now noticed that it was the first of my blue Corydalis to flower already in May (but May was very hot this year here), it is good to know that is how it should be, and so most likely my 'Spinners' is the right plant. Then there are other blue flexuosa type Corydalis which I have all gotten as 'Craigton Blue', but they flower earlier than the plant I got from Maggi, so I suspect they are something else. it seems here all blue Corydalis are named 'Craigton Blue', it is the most famous name. 
Also here C.elata flowers the latest, usually in July.
Leena from south of Finland

 

In Association with Amazon.co.uk


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942