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Author Topic: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide  (Read 52976 times)

Afloden

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #195 on: December 02, 2015, 12:19:17 AM »
Three new species just published;

Polygonatum autumnale -- the first described autumn-flowering species seen here in fruit in May 2014 Arunachal Pradesh,

two images of P. angelicum with its white verrucose perigone also taken in AP a few days later,

and P. luteoverrucosum with its yellow perigone.

The formermost is known from a single site in AP, and the other two are known along the eastern side of the Tsiang (Tsangpo) in AP and into Tibet.  These latter two were a serendipitous discovery when our original itinerary was canceled due to the landslides which had closed the road north to our original destination. I had previously only seen bad specimens from Tibet in fruit. In habitat they are separated by elevation with angelicum growing nearly 600 meters higher in elevation than luteoverrucosum.  Also seen on these treks were at least three other species.
Tennessee, Smokey Mountains, US

Afloden

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #196 on: December 02, 2015, 12:23:21 AM »
And the true Polygonatum nodosum seen in Chongqing Province, China this autumn.... Nearly all other plants in cultivation with purple leaves or silvery centers are something related to P. cyrtonema.

This is a very small plant with up to about 7 leaves and long nodose rhizomes that were crawling along the surfaces of moss covered rocks and logs.
Tennessee, Smokey Mountains, US

Maggi Young

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #197 on: December 02, 2015, 10:13:29 AM »
Exciting additions to this  topic, Aaron - we are grateful for your  direct experience of seeing these plants in habitat.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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bulborum

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #198 on: December 02, 2015, 10:25:30 AM »
The last one DSC_0889 looks a little as the wrong-named Polygonatum oppositifolium from Chen Yi I have

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #199 on: December 02, 2015, 07:32:05 PM »
I have a little (20 cms high) species described as simply with lemon flowers. It's in bud now (SH) and I'll try to get a photo when it's out. It came from a local garden centre who had it from a local nursery which is now out of business unfortunately. Owners retired and no-one taking their place. Such is the way of many or most small, specialist nurseries in NZ.

I also have P. graminifolium in bud.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #200 on: December 30, 2015, 12:32:24 PM »
News of a new publication from Aaron Floden -  full text not freely available meantime
See pictures in Aaron's post 195  above.


Three new Solomon’s Seals (Polygonatum: Asparagaceae) from the Eastern Himalaya
Article in Phytotaxa 236(3):273 · December 2015 

 Aaron Floden,   University of Tennessee

Abstract

Three new Polygonatum (Asparagaceae) are described and illustrated from the Eastern Himalaya. These species, Polygonatum autumnale, P. angelicum, and P. luteoverrucosum, have opposite leaves and are evergreen. The foremost is the first autumn-flowering species in the genus and is known from a single locality in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Polygonatum angelicum and P. luteoverrucosum are the first species in the genus to be reported with distinctly verrucose perigone surfaces. These two are sympatric in Arunachal Pradesh, India, and Xizang, China, but occur at different elevations. Their relationships to other opposite-leaved species are discussed and a key is provided to these and related species.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2016, 12:46:31 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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Lesley Cox

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #201 on: December 30, 2015, 07:18:46 PM »
Just remembered I didn't post my little pale polygonatum here, though I think I did on the Southern Hemisphere thread and there were a couple of suggestions as to what it may be. Perhaps a confirmation (or otherwise) please? Here it is. I think the flowers are pale jade green rather than the lemon which the label said.

It grows to about 30 cms and the leaves are maybe 5 cms long, the flowers about 1 cm long or a little more.

I've been back through the pages of December then November to find the name suggestions but can't find that post, from Jacqui (Parsla) I think. I know my eyesight's getting worse but heck, missing things altogether? I think one suggestion may have been cirrhifolium or something like that.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2015, 07:25:08 PM by Lesley Cox »
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Egon27

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #202 on: December 31, 2015, 05:26:19 PM »
Hallo,
I have a problem with the naming of Polygonatum. I buy it in China. It is low, about 10-15 cm.
Egon

Afloden

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #203 on: December 31, 2015, 09:34:35 PM »
Lesley, very cute little plant. It looks like leptophyllum from the Himalaya, but does the plant get any taller? The verticillate species are somewhat of a mess and I won't be resolving all the taxonomic issues with those.

Egon, that looks like kansuense, a very nice form of it.

 Aaron
Tennessee, Smokey Mountains, US

Leena

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #204 on: January 01, 2016, 08:46:36 AM »
Lesley, how nice looking Polygonatum. :)
Leena from south of Finland

Egon27

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #205 on: January 01, 2016, 09:31:54 AM »
Polygonatum kansuenes is the synonyms of Polygonatum verticillatum. My plant has wider leaves, bigger and nicer flowers and low growth. I'm afraid that it will be difficult to find a good name.

Afloden

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #206 on: January 02, 2016, 02:32:59 AM »
Egon,

 Kansuense is a synonym of verticillatum in the Flora of China, but it is a very distinct plant. I have molecular data that shows that it is distinct. It is a low growing plant with usually many outward facing pink flowers and a scabrous stem. I have seen specimens from Nepal north and eastward to Gansu, China. It is very similar to some forms of prattii, but prattii usually has really broadly ovate leaves.

 
Tennessee, Smokey Mountains, US

Maggi Young

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #207 on: January 08, 2016, 12:15:52 PM »
Aaron Floden has been busy again!

A new Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum: Asparagaceae) from northern Thailand

Polygonatum costatumFloden sp. nov [/b]

Article in Phytotaxa 236(3):279 · December 2015

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285383465_A_new_Solomon's_Seal_Polygonatum_Asparagaceae_from_northern_Thailand  ( may not be freely available meantime)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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Afloden

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Re: Polygonatum, A pictoral guide
« Reply #208 on: January 08, 2016, 12:27:55 PM »
It should also be noted that Polygonatum gongshanense http://www.sekj.org/PDF/anb51-free/anb51-333.pdf was published from Yunnan in 2014 and is a segregate of P. cathcartii (though I believe it is more closely related to P. autumnale).

And Polygonatum campanulatum was recently published from Yunnan; http://biotaxa.org/Phytotaxa/article/view/phytotaxa.236.1.10. This is an evergreen species with bell shaped yellow flowers and grows as an epiphyte in the Gaoligongshan.

 I agree with the authors that both are novel species and the second one they chose the same name I had in a draft manuscript.

 
Tennessee, Smokey Mountains, US

 

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