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Author Topic: Pleione 2018  (Read 4832 times)

Steve Garvie

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #75 on: May 07, 2018, 09:49:55 AM »
I was thinking the same thing Anders.
I grow a wide range of “forms” of x barbarae -many are similar to Graham’s plants. I have separated these from my main collection as I am convinced that they are virus-infected. These plants grow very well producing large pseudobulbs and usually multiple growths. The leaves do not exhibit obvious mosaics and the flowers are not deformed. That said there are obvious colour breaks in the flowers. The colour breaks are of two obvious forms -in one the colour breaks are mirrored between sibling pseudobulbs descended from the same vegetative parent. Perhaps this is constitutional reflecting the identical genetic inheritance. However, there are other colour breaks which vary between genetically identical pseudobulbs -even when the pseudobulbs share the same pot and growing conditions. I believe that this is a consequence of virus.

We always assume that viral infection of a plant will cause constitutional weakness and/or malformation (including colour breaks without physical deformity) but this is not necessarily so. I fear that virus is much more prevalent in pleiones than we dare to believe. I also think that either x barbarae is very susceptible to virus or, infection is already prevalent in wild populations and may contribute to the variable appearance of this “taxon”.
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Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

ashley

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #76 on: May 07, 2018, 11:15:07 AM »
Has anyone tried the Agdia test kit for orchid viruses?

An intereresting question Anders.  Do they offer kits for viruses affecting pleiones?  On the website I could find only cymbidium mosaic & odontoglossum ringspot tests but maybe missed something. 
Running ELISAs in the garden shed would be the next challenge ;) ;D


A couple of coronaria hybrids:
Kyoto
P. pleionoides x coronaria
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 12:03:35 PM by ashley »
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

sjusovare

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #77 on: May 07, 2018, 01:14:33 PM »
Color breaks are not always viral, what is characteristic of virus is uneven blotches. (watermark type).
Again flashkit for orchid does not detect PFBV but only CyMV and ORSV. One test which may detect PFBV is the potyvirus group but not comfirmed for now. I will try it this year

Some plants resist more than others, they still remain a resoervoir and innoculum source for the other plants in collection (think about flamed tulips, which carry potyvirus without loosing vitality, but plant them among regular tulips, and the result will not eb pretty in the following years)
I don't think x barbarae is highly virosed in the wild, however in collection, the prevalence is high, especially since many are old clones which are in collection since decades, often mixed up with many others. (and let's not forget that many suppliers have contaminated their stocks by importing virosed plants from a dutch source)
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 06:19:47 PM by sjusovare »
Julien

Anders

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #78 on: May 07, 2018, 07:24:06 PM »
Thanks for the comments. The radical thing to do would be to get rid of all of them to avoid contamination other genera. But I couldn't do that so I I think I will move them to a distant corner of the garden far away from other orchids.

Anders

sjusovare

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #79 on: May 07, 2018, 07:37:37 PM »
I have no clue whether PFBV can actually contaminate other genera, it seems rater specific to pleiones, however pleiones can be contaminated by other virus (one of mine caught cucumber mozaic, it was in the same greenhouse as the cucumbers, started to show typical mozaic pattern afterwards and tested positive for it).

So far, we have no cure for virus, so the only solution really is to destroy infected plants, but it might not prevent spreading alltogether, since plants can remain asymptomatic (but still contagious) during years before it actually starts to show after the plant has been stressed.

We all noticed in recent years an alarming increase of viral signs in collection, even on newly aquired plants from reputable growers, which suggest that the problem is far to be solved (espeically since some people, grower and seller alike, just decide to "believe" -wishfull thinking- that virus signs are not viral but the result of cultivation conditions and keep on selling/swapping/offering obviously contaminated plants, the latest I saw were at EOCCE show last march, but I also saw pictures of the Dresden show which were far to be "clean"  ::) )
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 07:58:47 PM by sjusovare »
Julien

svlarsen

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #80 on: May 13, 2018, 09:00:43 AM »
I bought this a few years ago on ebay as Pln. grandiflora “red-spotted lip”. It is clearly a Winter-flowering hybrid (is it Wharfdale?).

Does anyone have an image of “Pln. grandiflora red-spotted lip”?



In 2015 I also bought on eBay several 3FS and 2FS bulbs of what the seller /from Germany/ called " pleione grandiflora "red-spotted lip". Here are the photos of what came out from what I bought. One flower has white petals and raspberry spots on the lip. At least this one looks like what I expected to see. But the other two have pale lilac petals and brownish spots on the lip. Can anybody identify them? Three years ago I was so naive to rely upon what the seller stated and kept all the bulbs in one pot. Now I have around 100 bulbs and bulbills. It's a challenge to pot each one in a personal pot, but I will do it if necessary.

Graham Catlow

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #81 on: May 13, 2018, 07:54:11 PM »
Pleione x taliensis - a different clone from the one previously shown.

616253-0

616255-1

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Bo'ness. Scotland

vigor

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #82 on: May 14, 2018, 02:11:54 PM »
Pleione x taliensis - a different clone from the one previously shown.

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

Graham, your plants looks more like x barbarae

Graham Catlow

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #83 on: May 14, 2018, 06:18:40 PM »
Graham, your plants looks more like x barbarae

Hi Vigor, I had expected someone to say it looks virused but hadn't expected this. What makes you think it is x barbarae and not x taliensis please.

Bo'ness. Scotland

vigor

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #84 on: May 15, 2018, 03:14:39 AM »
Hi Vigor, I had expected someone to say it looks virused but hadn't expected this. What makes you think it is x barbarae and not x taliensis please.


your  Reply #62 shows x taliensis,  you can go to Paul Cumbleton's website ( http://www.pleione.info) to see the difference. x barbarae is from natural hybridizaion and very variable. Many photos of different clones of  x barbarae are shown at Paul Cumbleton's website.

svlarsen

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #85 on: May 15, 2018, 09:26:05 PM »
Graham,Vigor
thank you! I have already moved them to different pots.

Graham Catlow

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Re: Pleione 2018
« Reply #86 on: May 15, 2018, 09:40:32 PM »
your  Reply #62 shows x taliensis,  you can go to Paul Cumbleton's website ( http://www.pleione.info) to see the difference. x barbarae is from natural hybridizaion and very variable. Many photos of different clones of  x barbarae are shown at Paul Cumbleton's website.


Thanks Vigor, I see what you mean. It seems that x taliensis is less variable than x barbarae.
Bo'ness. Scotland

 

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