Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Flowers and Foliage Now => Topic started by: fermi de Sousa on July 01, 2014, 11:51:15 PM

Title: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: fermi de Sousa on July 01, 2014, 11:51:15 PM
Appropriately for the middle of winter we have snowdrops in bloom.
This little clump of Galanthus elwesii originally came from that master bulb grower, Otto Fauser, and has established itself nicely in our hot dry garden at the base of a Chinese Elm, a far cry from Otto's cool climate garden in the dandenongs!
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2014, 01:45:17 PM
Fermi,

How much winter chill do you get? It seems that you are nearly frost free?
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: fermi de Sousa on July 02, 2014, 10:50:28 PM
Hi Robert,
we drop down to -7oC once in awhile; this morning it dropped to -1oC which is the coldest so far this winter.
The good thing is that even if we drop below 0oC it doesn't stay that low all day - unlike parts of the States when I was there in 1996/97!
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Robert on July 03, 2014, 01:05:49 AM
Fermi

Thanks for the info.! It does help give me an idea the conditions your plants have to deal with. It seems somewhat like our Sacramento Valley here in California. Up here at the farm we can get a meter of snow - generally less, but only a little bit colder than the valley during the winter.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 03, 2014, 01:15:00 AM
Many crocuses here at present, some too early, or at least earlier than usual. One is well out but has been chewed overnight so here is a picture from last year or the year before. Actually from 2009! I've been told that there may be none left in Australia. I hope this is not so as mine came from there but I can't send any back as their "rules" are as crazy as ours.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Otto Fauser on July 03, 2014, 07:03:05 AM
Lesley,lucky you to still grow E.A.Bowles selection "Chocolate Soldier". Here in Australia everyone has lost it: Marcus who imported it originally , Mat Murray , myself , etc .  Look after it
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 04, 2014, 11:55:54 PM
Here's Cyrtanthus mackenii, kindly sent to me by Dave Toole, flowering now.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 06, 2014, 04:39:57 AM
I went to the market on Saturday morning, a bitterly cold day but really good to see people again. I felt I'd been incarcerated in the house for much too long. I did my market shopping and then realized I had lost the next page of my shopping list which was about 15 items to be bought at the supermarket on the way home. I had my priorities right though. The only thing I could remember was a bottle of wine. ;D I had to spend about half an hour wandering round to see what looked likely. I think I got most of it. Best of all though, I had been able to buy a bunch of wintersweet at the market. It's scenting my bedroom beautifully.

Home to find a little package of Crocus seed, from Hubi in Germany, by way of Dave in Invercargill.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 06, 2014, 07:26:00 AM
Here are some of my seedlings. Snowdrops and Crocus vallicola.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 06, 2014, 10:54:06 AM
They look good Anthony. I daresay those labels aren't seen too often in Auckland. I love vallicola. I had just one for several years and though I hand pollinated it it never set seed. Then I had a few seedlings from Pilous seed and from the first flower, good seed each year since. I get about a dozen flowers now and most set seed.

Have just been watching the first episode (of two) about the English guy Malcolm Webster who murdered his Aberdonian wife in 1993 then went on to try it with an Auckland woman in NZ but was stopped in time, and now, (episode 2 tomorrow night) is about to go for another Scot on the west coast. Spooky character but quite good TV.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 07, 2014, 04:59:40 PM
There's a little bit of Oz on show at the RHS Hampton Court flower show  - this photo from a twitter page, from Alexandra Bevis 

[attachimg=1]
Essence of Australia garden at Hampton Court RHS show
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 08, 2014, 10:08:59 AM
There's a little bit of Oz on show at the RHS Hampton Court flower show  -



And it has met with favour  from the judges :
Congratulations to J Fogarty,designer  and RBG Melbourne for winning Best in Show at RHS Hampton Court Show  with their Essence Of Australia garden


[attachimg=1]
 rbg.vic.gov.au
 http://jimfogartydesign.com.au/ (http://jimfogartydesign.com.au/)   
 hmaaustralia.com.au


Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 08, 2014, 11:46:31 AM
I think I should have sown fewer of my spiral leaved Albuca seeds. There are 62 bulbs here, from seed sown in December.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 09, 2014, 12:14:12 AM
Very windy today, but my Arum purpureospathum, Epidendron ibaguense and Protea cynaroides are looking good.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 09, 2014, 05:03:20 AM
Presumably Anthony, that is Albuca spiralis? I have just sown a small number today, from the NZ Fritillaria and Small Bulb Group. So I can expect good germination then? When the weather warms. It's the coldest day we've had so far this year. Heavy frost, no sun and bitter wind. Roll on spring. Even so, there are many crocuses out, and like in Otto's OZ garden, snowdrops, Cyclamen and the first Iris reticulata ('Harmony', earlier than usual). I was able on Saturday to buy a single I. danfordiae in bloom at the market. I'll plant it deep as soon as the flower fades.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 09, 2014, 09:55:35 AM
They were sent as Albuca spiral Lesley. I sowed them in pure pumice and have kept them reasonably moist to give them a good growing season.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 14, 2014, 01:55:32 AM
Thanks Anthony. I'll await mine with interest. Spiral leaves are lovely I think.

Winter continues cold in the south but today there is good sun after a hard frost. Most mornings have been like the one below, gorgeous colour, a quick sun-up, this disappearing into heavy cloud for the rest of the day.

I found the red mushroom (Amanita muscaria, fly agaric,) under our letter box recently and the other, (Caprinus comatus, shaggy ink cap) under the plum tree which is hated for its leaf/flower/fruit/rain fall on my nursery beds but useful for its summer shade. I'd not met this fungus before but apparently it is edible while young. This one's a bit late I think and an hour later was beginning to drip black "ink," and looking distinctly dodgy. positively sinister in fact.

Through the winter this rather nice grey polyanthus has been in flower. It was here when we arrived and I like its unusual colour. It has a strong perfume too.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Robert on July 14, 2014, 03:40:52 AM
Beautiful Sunrise Lesley!
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 14, 2014, 11:27:52 AM
What a sky!  I've passed that pic on for use on the SRGC Twitter page, Lesley - to let the "twittersphere" see what our members are seeing.  8)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 15, 2014, 08:41:03 AM
Thank you Robert and Maggi. Unfortunately, like all such sunrises, it was precursor to a "shepherds' warning" type of day. We've had few day recently with no rain, accompanied by bitterly cold winds but the colouring made up for a lot of that. After I took the photo I went in to put the kettle on and within two minutes when I went out again, all that glorious red and purple was light yellow then gone a minute later.

Maggi I didn't know we had a Twitter page. I can't cope with either Twitter or Facebook and feel the world is leaving me way behind because of it.
Title: SRGC on Twitter now
Post by: Maggi Young on July 15, 2014, 09:17:40 AM
A kind member was good enough to start a Twitter page for the Club so that we could have a foot in that camp. I pass on interesting bits and bobs to be posted there to let the "Tweeps" know what we're up to :

https://twitter.com/ScottishRockGC

For other members on Twitter: why not keep in touch - 'Follow' etc!!  8)

Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 16, 2014, 10:06:28 AM
"Tweeps?" I thought those who twittered were twits! ;D
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 16, 2014, 10:56:20 AM
"Tweeps?" I thought those who twittered were twits! ;D
A commonly held belief, Lesley. ;)
 But in trying to get to grips with the notion of  this "social media" thingy,  I discover that "they" seem to refer to themselves as Tweeps  - derived I suppose from  people ("peeps") who tweet......    :)

Hard to imagine any medium more social than this forum, really, though......  ;D 8)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: arillady on July 20, 2014, 10:47:12 AM
Lachenalias making themselves at home.
A spider I missed when I took this photo.
the bulbocodiums ex Monocot years ago.
The oncocyclus irises are beginning.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 22, 2014, 03:19:35 AM
Golly Pat, is your season very early, like ours? It would seem so with Lachenalias and oncos out already!

I have a lot of "spring" crocuses well out and even finishing though a few haven't appeared yet. One of the nicest - for me anyway - is a hybrid of cvijicii x veluchensis. This one is, I think, the best coloured of a couple of batches of seedlings which have been gradually flowering over 3 or 4 years. The weather has been rotten for weeks, persistent rain, bitter, savage winds and some snow so that any poor crocus is finding life difficult and very few are opening properly before fading away. Not good photos but they give an idea of the colour.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: arillady on July 22, 2014, 10:36:46 AM
That is a lovely coloured Crocus Lesley. We have had cold and rain on and off for weeks. Yes the arils are early. I never remember when the lachenalias flower.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Jupiter on July 22, 2014, 11:23:58 AM

Early bulbs are starting here, many of them very early this year as you said Pat. I'll post bits and pieces as they come out.


(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3916/14674141066_188787b998_c.jpg)

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5575/14510506898_244c014844_c.jpg)

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3902/14510709447_3e0551d132_c.jpg)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 22, 2014, 12:55:54 PM
Always such a pleasure to see the fantastic photos from Forumists - thanks to you all!
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 22, 2014, 11:46:42 PM
Hi,

Some very beautiful plants on display. Wow Leslie! I am turning GREEN .... . Did you do the crocus cross? You know I am a bit of a purist but I must say that cross is beautiful. I have a few chrysanthus x biflorus (whatever!) crosses going here at the moment. I'll see if I have the time to post some pictures.

In the meantime . . . just a few to make a contribution:

Iris unguicularis ssp creticus grown from seed collected at the Kedros Plateau in Crete.

Crocus? cvijicii collected as Crocus veluchensis seed way below where it would be expected to occur at Tria Pigadia near Mt. Vermion.

Cyclamen coum Silver Leaves originally from Kath Dryden seed many moons ago - sorry about the weeds!

Hellebore lividus, again originally from Brian Mathew seed, many years ago.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lori S. on July 22, 2014, 11:49:11 PM
What an absolutely stunning crocus, Lesley!  I never imagined crocus could be that colour.

Beautiful photos, Jupiter!  Your skills at photography (and at growing plants  :)) )are enviable!
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 23, 2014, 12:15:27 AM
Lovely crocus Lesley. I have hopes for my Crocus vallicola you sent, the seedlings of which seem to be doing well. I have Narcissus "Polly's Pearl" just coming into bloom.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 23, 2014, 12:17:17 AM
Lori, Marcus, my seedling is one of a quite large batch which I grew as C. cvijicii. I had just a single corm for 3 or 4 years (may have had it from Potterton's (and Martin) though I'm not sure now.) It never set seed in its trough but then, unthinking of any result, planted veluchensis in the same trough and following the next flowering cvijicii set seed. It didn't occur to me they wouldn't be true, I was thrilled to have some seed at last. But it has to be a hybrid between them and the others, about 30 altogether, are a little similar, some slightly this colour and some pale yellow while a few are almost entirely purple like veluchensis, so a good mix. I selected out the best (in my opinion) half dozen and planted each in a separate pot to increase true but they seem quite slow. Cvijicii, planted apart in a raised bed and increasing quite well, never set seed while isolated. (IUt's potted again now, for the 2013 move.) I have a dozen corms now but all of the same clone of course though I have been able to get a few seedlings from Pilous seed more recently so I hope my original will enjoy a fulfilling relationship with those in due course. :)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 23, 2014, 12:21:29 AM
Lovely crocus Lesley. I have hopes for my Crocus vallicola you sent, the seedlings of which seem to be doing well. I have Narcissus "Polly's Pearl" just coming into bloom.

 Beat you there Anthony. Mine has been out for 3 weeks. It was from Bill in Tauranga as yours may have been too. It's very nice at this time of year. I recently learned of a man near Palmerston North who is doing well with onco irises. Don't know his name yet. I'm having to prize information out slowly from my local Iris Group convenor. But I believe he is in touch with Bill. I'm looking to buy some onco seed from the north when next available to see if my new found "cup of tea" method of germination works for them, as well as for just about every other iris. Trying it on Crocus, Erythronium and a few other hard bulb seeds too.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 23, 2014, 12:27:08 AM
Hi Lesley,

I have obviously missed something here ... what's the "Cup of Tea" method? :-\

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 23, 2014, 12:58:44 AM
Beat you there Anthony. Mine has been out for 3 weeks.
Mine are just seedlings Marcus. I got them from Lesley in October 2012, so this is their second coming. I didn't think they would like Auckland, but we'll just have to see. Must visit Bill again to see if he still has it.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 23, 2014, 01:57:09 AM
Hi Anthony,

Are we talking about Crocus vallicola or oncos? I think my comment may have been misconstrued. I was interested in Leslie's "Cup of Tea" method. Are you growing any oncos yet?

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Anthony Darby on July 23, 2014, 02:13:11 AM
Hi Marcus
In the quote you must have been referring to "Polly's Pearl", which did indeed come from Bill. Got my wires crossed again.  ::) We have had some cold weather for the past fortnight, including several grounds frosts. No, I don't have any oncos yet. Several of the pots of seeds from the lovely batch you sent are now miniature seas of "grass", which is very rewarding.  8)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 23, 2014, 09:34:22 AM
The "cup of tea" method for germinating seeds is one devised by I don't know who but has been used extensively over a number of years by Laurol, the Convenor of Otago Iris Group of NZIS. She had it from one Jack Scott, a well known nurseryman in Dunedin for many years, specializing in alpines and small bulbs and who introduced many lovely alpine plants to NZ, from older, famous UK nurseries such as Will Ingwersen's, Broadwell Alpines, Reginald Kaye and others. Almost all or maybe all the Porophyllum saxifragas in NZ were originally from Jack's importations. A trip to Dunedin, for me, always included a very expensive visit to Jack's nursery.

A couple of weeks ago Laurol and I were having a cup of coffee in town and talking about our respective seed sowings. She asked me had I known Jack. "Oh yes," I said. "A grumpy old b.....d." He was my uncle" she replied. Just as well we're good friends and anyway she couldn't argue about Jack's general disposition. He was a good grower and propagator though.

I was outraged that in all his time on earth, so far as I knew, Jack never let out the secret of his tea method to anyone except to Laurol, when she was about 10 years old. Here it is. It works. It really does.

For iris seeds which take a long time to germinate, including old or ultra dried-out seed, or many known to be precocious or difficult to germinate, place the seed in a small fabric pouch, sown along 3 sides. Add a label with whatever information is required. When you have a handful or however many you wish to sow in a single session, Place the little pouches upright in a small basin or margarine pot and pour onto them, a full strength cup of regular tea, well cooled. Let the seed soak for 24 hours then drain and add a fresh, cooled cup of tea. Do this twice more so that the seeds have a soaking from 4 cups of fresh tea, each soaking for 24 hours. Then drain the pouches (I place them on a wrung out dish cloth which absorbs the majority of the remaining tea and makes it easy to extract the seeds from the pouches), and then sow the seeds in regular seed pots or however you normally would, covering lightly with whatever medium you would normally use for this, such as a thin layer of seed mix, grit or whatever. Place the pots in a cool, secure place and water thoroughly, then as required.

OK, so what's different except for this extra amount of work? Laurol finds, and so am I now too, that seed which may take 2-6 months to germinate or even a year or more, is starting to germinate in a fortnight. The process if often completed - say 50 seedlings from 50 seeds - within 3 weeks. At the very least, it can knock a whole season off the time a species may take from germination to blooming. This has been particularly important for our local group this year as we've had a lot of seed given us to grow on as fund-raising plants for next year's national Convention. Seed has been sent of brand new cultivars raised in USA for us to raise and flower here, for our Convention goers. It's great for local breeders too who are no longer able to import new plants but we can still import seed as Iris germanica. And I must give a word of great appreciation here to the many USA breeders such as Schreiner, Aitken, Keppel, Ghio, Black and others who for years have supported NZ growers and the Iris Soc in general, by supplying their material; plants at very low costs and now seeds, freely gifted in most cases, knowing as they do, the difficulties we have with obtaining new material.

So, the method works a treat for bearded species and cultivars in general cultivation and I am particularly interested in trying those other recalcitrant beardeds, the oncos and regelias. But we know it also works for any species so far tried. We haven't tried junos or reticulatas yet due to a lack of seed material. I'd really like to get some of Alan McMurtrie's seed as a trial. It works with sibiricas, spurias, ensatas, unguiculares, PCs and so on. As a trial, some of our members sowed some of all of these from the NZIS list sent out in May, the seed in June. From the same packets Laurol and I did the tea thing and already have strong seedlings up to 10cms (bearded cultivars) or 4 cms (species) while the other members have no germination at all yet. Seed Laurol sowed in April has already produced seedlings of 30cms so far.

The problems start though when 500 assorted seeds are suddenly 500 assorted plants all needing potting on or planting out in a hurry. It's really hard to keep up with the demands of the process but given the people to do it and the material to work with as well as the space to store them, it can be hugely successful.

I'll also be sowing tomorrow, batches of some other hard seed species such as crocuses, erythroniums, Tecophilaea and other odds and ends, to see if it works for those too. I'm not bothering with dwarf Narcissus as they germinate quite quickly if sown fresh anyway. But I wonder about unfresh seed of, e.g. Ranunculaceae such as Helleborus, Adonis, R. calandrinioides and so on but especially including Trillium. If THAT works, what a bonus that would be! There is much experimenting yet to be done, and most of all, notes to be kept, never my strong point.


EDIT: This post and others relating to this discussion  have been copied to a new thread :

http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0)
Please continue this discussion on that thread
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Tim Ingram on July 23, 2014, 10:09:19 AM
That is really interesting Lesley! I wonder if the active principle might be the plant hormones gibberellins which can be so instrumental in stimulating germination of tricky seed like gentians, cacti and other plants? My scientific studies were on gibberellins and involved extracting them from young growing leaves (and following their metabolism) and so tea leaves are potentially an ideal source of the hormone, and much easier to use than the complexity of pure GA itself (which also leads to etiolation of seedlings and is extremely potent). This is definitely a technique to play with! What a great place this Forum is! :)


EDIT: This post and others relating to this discussion  have been copied to a new thread :

http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0)
Please continue this discussion on that thread
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: arillady on July 23, 2014, 11:14:50 AM
I will definitely use this method when i sow seed next.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: fleurbleue on July 23, 2014, 01:16:06 PM
Thank you so much Lesley to share your interesting experiments with us  ;)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: David Nicholson on July 23, 2014, 06:24:33 PM
Maggi,

I wondered if it might be possible please for Lesley's post above to be cross posted on the Growing from Seed thread perhaps with a sticky?
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 23, 2014, 06:54:39 PM
Maggi,

I wondered if it might be possible please for Lesley's post above to be cross posted on the Growing from Seed thread perhaps with a sticky?


I've done that - don't say I'm not good to you....... ;D

http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0) Please continue this discussion on that thread
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: David Nicholson on July 23, 2014, 07:18:13 PM
Ta lots :-*
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: fleurbleue on July 23, 2014, 08:32:38 PM
thank you Maggi, too    ;)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 23, 2014, 09:16:17 PM
Hi Lesley,

Very interesting. So this process has never been put out there until now? Probably worth a properly set up experiment with some conrols. Bit hard to get my head around the stratification problem and the warm, cold, warm/day length requirements that many plant groups have evolved to respond to. But hey its always great to hear good news on the seed raising front.

Cheers,  Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 23, 2014, 09:40:02 PM
Hi,

A few more from Hill View:

Another form of Cyclamen coum SL - this one has more corkscrew-shaped flowers
Cyclamen coum ssp albissimum - Cyclamen Society
Galanthus "Rodmartin" - lovely strongly growing plant
Galanthus "Megan" - sorry its out of focus - I noted Otto had mentioned this on the Galanthus thread.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 23, 2014, 09:55:11 PM
Few more:

Cyclamen coum SL Darker Flower
Iris Sheila Ann Germaney Katharine Hodgkin
Crocus adanensis
Crocus x bornmuelleri (chrys x biflorus ssp isauricus)

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Stephen Vella on July 24, 2014, 10:03:50 PM
Hi Marcus nice galanthus Megan .. So your back from your trip then.. hope there's some stories to tell and picks on this forum?
Lesley interesting to hear of the cup of tea method...something I will try. I want to give it a go on dactyl orchids, I can get few to germinate but not high numbers.. Trilliums I have been sowing for years..any tips like this I will give it a go. Like Marcus said the stratification issue.. maybe speeded up?
Thanks for passing that info
Cheers
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 25, 2014, 12:06:07 AM
Hi Stephen,

I hope Otto's seeds yield something interesting on the galanthus front. I have never had seeds on Trym, Megan or Trymlet.

Re trip, you are not on my mailing list? Here try this story: http://hillviewrareplants.com.au/ramblings/scents-and-sensibilities-the-dragon-lily-of-crete (http://hillviewrareplants.com.au/ramblings/scents-and-sensibilities-the-dragon-lily-of-crete)

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 25, 2014, 04:50:20 AM
Marcus, may I correct you please? I'm pretty sure your picture of 'Sheila Ann Germaney is, in fact, 'Katharine Hodgkin.' SAG has only a little yellow signal stripe and no yellow in the falls. Probably just a slip of your tongue/finger? :)
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 25, 2014, 05:08:50 AM
That's very interesting Tim, your comments about tea foliage and the giberellins. The whole subject of giberellic acid has left me totally in the dark and is a place I'm never likely to go, though if I were 30 or more years younger, who knows. I hope you or someone can take this tea thing a bit further because it does seem to me to have some potential for exciting possibilities.

So far as I know Marcus, Jack Scott never mentioned such a thing to anyone except that apparently from the age of 5 he always encouraged Laurol in her gardening interests (Laurol at 5 I mean, not Jack. He always seemed to be about 70!) We in the Iris Group have for several years watched with envy the great success Laurol had with her Iris seeds but the method wasn't talked about much until we received so much American seed last year for the upcoming Convention and Laurol, anxious to encourage as many members as possible to try the seed, did a workshop on the subject at a meeting. She has been very happy to share the method so it's certainly no great secret now. Jack himself always did tend to keep things to himself, such as this method and word of any plant source he may have had.

Stephen, I don't know what would happen with seed the size of orchid seed which is just dust to all intents and purposes. It would require some different way to manage the soaking process I think. All the seeds I'm trying are relatively large; iris, trillium, crocus etc and hard. I'm not bothering with frits or lilium because they germinate so well anyway within a reasonable time frame, and it hasn't occurred to me to try it with say epigaea, ramonda or primulas all of which I've sown in the last few days, but just sowing direct onto clean grit as I normally would. If you could mange it, the results will be interesting. Maybe the soaking time would need to be adjusted down? I've never sown Dactylorhiza seed but do have them come up in quantity among pots, in paths or grass or anywhere really, naturalizing in effect which is very nice. Admittedly this has only been with the spotted D. maculata or its ssp fuchsii, not elata or foliosa though I get the occasional self sown seedling of the latter. I had a nice stand of spotties outside our gate, on the roadside for 3 or 4 years until the council men came along and sprayed them! Never another showed its face.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Tim Ingram on July 25, 2014, 09:57:59 AM
Lesley - gibberellins are involved in many different aspects of growth, much in the way animal hormones are. Their best known role is in stimulating elongation of the internodes of plants (viz: tall and dwarf peas), but they are also classically involved in seed germination, seen in barley by the stimulation of enzymes which break down starch into sugars as the embryo starts to grow and the seedling develops (i.e: malting). They work at incredibly low concentrations which is why using pure isolated or chemically manufactured GAs can be tricky, so the technique you describe is probably just as effective (if this is indeed what is happening in detail). Science is an unusual activity in that it shares information and works by collaboration, even if there is plenty of rivalry too and it builds on little nuggets of information like this.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Jupiter on July 25, 2014, 12:07:19 PM
Years ago I used to do a lot of tissue culture for work and these hormones were part and parcel of media preparation. In some protocols we used to use a culture or nurse cells, which were undifferentiated (callus) of Nicotiana tabacum in suspension. These cells were spead on the surface of the agar media to hormonally support the formation of shoots.

I was wondering, if GA is present in tea in sufficient quantities to initiate germination then surely green tea, which is un-fermented should have more...? It would be really interesting to set up a controlled experiment to look into the effectiveness of tea. Perhaps seed of three recalcitrant species, each sample split into three treatment groups, black tea, green tea and water control, something like 20 seed in each group and then a replication of the whole experiment at a later date. Records kept of germination time post treatment should show up any useful effect, but of course would tell you nothing about the actual mechanism. Does anyone have time to do this? Not me...!


EDIT: This post and others relating to this discussion  have been copied to a new thread :

http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0)
Please continue this discussion on that thread

Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 25, 2014, 01:05:33 PM
You are right Lesley - sorry folks! M
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 26, 2014, 01:18:51 AM
Incredibly beautiful winter weather here.

Just a few more:

Iris x danfordiae Snow White - An Alan McMurtrie bred hybrid purchased from Janis.
Crocus gargaricus - seed collected from Gok Tepe many moons ago with Norman Stevens.
Crocus paschei - clearly see the distinction in the flower from C. adanensis.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Mini bulb lover on July 26, 2014, 11:42:55 AM
Some photos from the show bench at the first meeting of the Victorian Bulb Society, held last Wednesday here in Melbourne. Can anyone identify the orange flower for me? Unfortunately some plants weren't labelled.

Cryptostephanus vansonii
Lachenalia ??
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 26, 2014, 11:31:54 PM
Hi,

Just a few more from Hill View:

Crocus sieberi "Hubert Edelstein" - I hope that's how you spell it!
 edit : nope! = 'Hubert Edelsten'
Crocus versicolor - from the Crocus Group
Iris reticulata "Velvet Smile"
Crocus chrysanthus " Charmer" - Od sort of greeny yellow with a little dark base - from Janis

Cheers, M
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 27, 2014, 05:32:43 AM
Years ago I used to do a lot of tissue culture for work and these hormones were part and parcel of media preparation. In some protocols we used to use a culture or nurse cells, which were undifferentiated (callus) of Nicotiana tabacum in suspension. These cells were spead on the surface of the agar media to hormonally support the formation of shoots.

I was wondering, if GA is present in tea in sufficient quantities to initiate germination then surely green tea, which is un-fermented should have more...? It would be really interesting to set up a controlled experiment to look into the effectiveness of tea. Perhaps seed of three recalcitrant species, each sample split into three treatment groups, black tea, green tea and water control, something like 20 seed in each group and then a replication of the whole experiment at a later date. Records kept of germination time post treatment should show up any useful effect, but of course would tell you nothing about the actual mechanism. Does anyone have time to do this? Not me...!

Jupiter, are you volunteering for this experiment and the paper work? I think it should happen but my own record keeping is just too casual for me to do it usefully. Besides, I'm too old!
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 27, 2014, 05:34:58 AM
I really love the while danfordiae hybrid. No sign of any of Alan's reaching these shores, except a very few rather ordinary blue/violet seedling from private sources.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on July 27, 2014, 10:47:11 AM

Please Note !!

A request was made to make a new thread for the discussion of the "cup of tea method " for germinating seeds - this has been done - and relevant posts from here have been moved there. The new thread is HERE: http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0 (http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=12088.0)

Please continue the discussion on that subject  on THAT thread and not in this one!! Thank you.

 
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 27, 2014, 10:31:06 PM
Hi Maggi,

Sorry about my naming stuff ups. I am in a dreadful rush moving almost half of my nursery to a new site and things are a little out of kilter.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 27, 2014, 11:43:27 PM
Sorry Maggi, I didn't notice your request to continue the discussion there rather than here.

Marcus, re naming this or that,  believe me, I know the problem. Moving a nursery or even thinking about it is sheer HELL!
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 27, 2014, 11:56:42 PM
OMG! I have had occasional thoughts of walking away from it ....

Never again!

Few more from a very fluid Hill View:

Crocus ancyrensis - collected many sleeps ago from around Bolu.
Crocus cyprius - maybe originally given to me by Otto.
Crocus sieberi "Bowles White" or some stand in or other. There are a lot of white ones in wild populations.

Apologies as they are all a bit out of focus

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 28, 2014, 02:05:46 AM
All my sieberi forms have finished already along with many others that usually go well into August, even minimus is on the way out and sometimes that has gone on through September to October, though the much earlier white form is still going well. We are having a really odd (horrible) winter.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 28, 2014, 06:26:44 AM
All my sieberi forms are just hitting their straps. Beautiful weather here.

Few more from Hill View:

Galanthus "Wendys Gold"
Galanthus nivalis "Savill Gold"
Crocus sieberi ssp nivalis - if there is such an entity these days?

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 28, 2014, 06:28:33 AM
Apologies for the dirt splattered snowies - I had the sprinkler on!

Cheers, M
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on July 29, 2014, 02:20:36 AM
While I am on a roll:

Clematis cirrhosa var. balearica - love it to bits and so do the honeyeaters.
Cyclamen persicum Silver Leaves - flowers from Autumn onwards into spring.
Ornithogalum sibthorpii - under-loved genus - I like them.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: fermi de Sousa on July 30, 2014, 07:48:49 AM
You're definitely on a roll there, Marcus.
Is the cyclamen a form of C. persicum var. autumnale?
At our last AGS Vic Group meeting Viv Condon spoke about saxifraga and brought quite a number of live examples.
Otto brought some retic Iris 'Violet beauty', Narcissus 'Ben B'ler' and Juno rosenbachiana (nicholai) "Varsob"
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: arillady on July 30, 2014, 10:13:39 AM
Beautiful potted plants Fermi and Otto.
Marcus some lovely bulbs there. Love the Clematis as it is the only one I can grow and keep.
I visited EA Bowles Myddelton house and garden while in London recently. Would love to see what still survives in the rock garden. The rose garden was replanted in 1984 so the only rose left from Bowles'time is a cutting of Rosa moschata. There were different hostas in the far rock garden down near the river. These were only fairly recent additions.
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 30, 2014, 10:18:54 AM

Otto brought some retic Iris 'Violet beauty', Narcissus 'Ben B'ler' and Juno rosenbachiana (nicholai) "Varsob"
cheers
fermi

You're just trying to make me jelous Fermi. Nasty man! ;D
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Lesley Cox on July 30, 2014, 10:21:14 AM
The hostas look good Pat, especially on that slope. They'll make fine clumps and very viewable. Funny how when I had a hilly garden I longed for flat places and now on the dead flat I'd love a sloping area. :-\
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Stephen Vella on July 30, 2014, 10:01:24 PM
Hi Marcus.. Yes I did read your post on the druncunculus a while back and the orchids, fascinating stuff.. I was so blown away by the feilds of terrestrial orchids on Crete per square meter on the road verges when Matt Murray and I went back in 2001, imagin if the goats where fenced off for a few yrs to regenerate some areas?? Crete does hold some botanical delights.. Id love to go back someday.
Yes I heard from Otto, he did mention some new galanthus from you..Is he hoping to find variation in his seed sowings.. I bought some so called yellow variants nothing like Wendy's gold, nothing different .. Apparently Wendy's gold is easily taken by virus? How long does it take for the virus to show symtoms and kill galanthus ?
Cheers
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Stephen Vella on July 30, 2014, 10:07:09 PM
Hey Marcus how are your numbers of  Trym or Megan? Looking at listing soon?
Cheers
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: Hillview croconut on August 01, 2014, 04:16:18 AM
Hi,

Pat, couldn't you grow viticella or flammula or maybe texensis? They are all pretty tough customers. Even C. tangutica is extremely drought resistant.

Fermi, yes there is an autumn form of Cyclamen persicum but this one has just popped up out of a batch of seedlings that I can trace way back a Melvyn Jope collection in ? Lebanon (maybe). A fellow forumist sent me seeds of the autumn form from Israel and they are growing on.

Stephen, how long is a piece of string?? Some galanthus succumb quickly others show no signs of dropping off the perch. I don't have many of either of the Trym types but Trymlet is the quickest to increase.

Cheers, Marcus
Title: Re: July 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere
Post by: arillady on August 02, 2014, 10:08:29 AM
Hi Marcus, Thanks for the other species names. that is what I love about you. If I can grow a particular plant you let me know others that might need similar situations.