Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

Bulbs => Crocus => Topic started by: Janis Ruksans on October 02, 2019, 06:10:28 AM

Title: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 02, 2019, 06:10:28 AM
Repotting finished! Still left to plant some seedlings and other bulbs which had no place in greenhouse for pots. Yesterday all the day watered something around 9000 pots. It tooks just 8 hours.
But crocuses still are blooming.
Here white Crocus pamphylicus grown from seeds collected near Fersin, S Turkey
and 2 pictures of seedling from Crocus dispathaceus from Icel. May be hybrid, but one of best this autumn.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 03, 2019, 06:19:02 AM
A lot of crocuses are blooming and every day pictured, but preparing pictures for Forum takes time so only few I can prepare every day.
Now in this entry 4 different seedlings of Crocus cartwrightianus cv. 'Purple Eye'
and possibly new (?) species from speciosus group, but at present regarded as C. armeniensis from Vahagni. I wanted to research it together with Zhirair this autumn, but barbaric killing of him cancelled all travel plans...
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 03, 2019, 06:23:45 AM
Nicely blooms Crocus nerimaniae and C. wattiorum. Each flower was carefully hand pollinated. After 3 generations I successfully rised virus free C. nerimaniae - almost 100% virus infected in the wild + population almost destroyed by wild boars.
And another almost certainly new species from cancellatus group from near Gulnar in S Turkey - so delicate sand small - only around half of traditional cancellatus size, and very uniform.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 03, 2019, 06:27:51 AM
In greenhouse almost finished but in garden now at top is occasional hybrid selected by me from open pollinated seeds of Crocus ilgazensis. The pollen parent almost certainly was C. pulchellus. Extremely floriferous and vigorous hybrid. I named it 'Fantasy' but not long ago some spring blooming cultivar in Holland was named as 'Fantasy' too, so I renamed mine as 'Autumn Fantasy'.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: StevenS on October 04, 2019, 07:18:33 PM
Yesterday I was pleasantly surprised to find both C. hermoneus ILOP-011 and C. dispathaceus Icel in full bloom.Especially C. hermoneus is such an elegant beauty, it might not be 'garden worthy' by classic standards but I find it so graceful it should best be admired up close and personal.

I was very happy to be able to obtain both from Janis this year and I self-pollinated both in the hope of some good seed to be harvested next year.

[attach=1]

[attach=2]

Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Hannelore on October 11, 2019, 09:49:06 AM
Crocus sativus

Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Yann on October 12, 2019, 05:47:44 PM
Crocus goulimyi, from Mr Vickery seeds. Stacked photos with my 120mm eq. olympus lens.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 13, 2019, 01:33:45 PM
Just a week ago I finished replanting of my bulbs and yesterday finished registering of all samples grown by me. This year I didn't include my own selections from wild stocks and they appear only under original gathering number, so total number of grown samples decreased and now is equal to "only" 4508 samples, from those crocuses are represented by 1586 samples. Now I have some time to work with pictures and in this entry different stocks of Iranian Crocus archibaldiorum from various localities.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 13, 2019, 04:07:01 PM
Some more crocuses blooming now
The first two are from new species (must be published soon, not by me) from Israel, growing at very low altitudes and earlier regarded as C. aleppicus.
Another new species from Armenia, found by Zhirair Basmajyan, killed this summer. Shortly before his killing we had telephone conversation and he wanted to show me exactly where this crocus is growing wild (I planed trip to Armenia). Now I have only some plants, collected by him. It is well separable from C. armeniensis by cream coloured anthers, much deeper yellow throat and stigmatic branches mostly positioned below or at tips of anthers, only rarely surpassing them.
On the fourth picture is Crocus armeniensis from locus classicus and as last
Crocus autranii - true wild form, collected shortly ago in Abchasia.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 13, 2019, 04:32:09 PM
I had very bad crop of C. banaticus this season. Corms were small and poorly looking and I expected no one flower and was very surprised when two pots suddenly were covered with flowers. Here picture from sample collected in forest near Mukachevo, W Ukraine.
Next 3 pictures are of Crocus bolensis - first two from locus classicus (the second is almost albino) and the third from Kuyucak Yaila.
The last is Crocus boryi from Greece.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 14, 2019, 06:52:39 PM
One of the most gracious species from Crocus speciosus group is C. brachyphilus. I even named it as C. speciosus subsp. elegans, but later it was raised to species level and name changed (not by me).
Crocus cambessedesii seem to be the autumn crocus with smallest flowers. It was not good grower last season, but some corms bloomed regardless of very small size.
And last two pictures shows very gracious crocus from cancellatus group, according number collected somewhere near Gulnar in S Turkey, but there is some fault with number and I must to search in elder planting books when this mistake happened to be sure about origin. This season anthers are not developed.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 14, 2019, 07:04:01 PM
Crocus cartwrightianus is ancient ancestor of famous saffron crocus C. sativus. Here variability of Cretan form of C. cartwrightianus  - var. cretensis, showing its large stigma.
On last picture Crocus caspius - white and light lilac form.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 15, 2019, 05:57:55 AM
Several species already finished blooming but many send out new and new flowers and some even still didn't started blooming. Here some last flowers pictured few days ago.
The first pair is of Crocus dispathaceus from Icel and the 2nd - very unusual seedling - could be hybrid.
Crocus gilanicus flowers are very delicate, here last flowers from sample collected in Iran.
Pure white C. goulimyi individual collected not far from Monemvasia. Usually Crocus goulimyi has quite long leaves at blooming time, this autumn they started development much later than usually and it is easy to pick out died flowers - usually leaves bother this.
And as last in this entry - F-2 seedling from hybrid between C. hadriaticus and C. sativus cashmerianusd - very spectacular.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 15, 2019, 07:08:40 AM
Iranian Crocus hakkariensis yesterday was cleaned from last flowers, this picture is made few days ago.
I wrote in previous entry that leaf development this autumn is delayed in Crocus goulimyi, but the same is with Crocus hatayensis, too.
From C. speciosus group started blooming one of the latest - Crocus hellenicus from South population near Varnakovo
but one of the best "speciosus" is C. ibrahimii - quite variable - on this picture the very best form.
And the last is mine C. kofudagensis - note the white style splitting into 3 orange branches well over top of anthers.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Yann on October 15, 2019, 09:16:12 PM
Well what to say except you grow many treasures one more beautiful than the other  :o
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: pehe on October 16, 2019, 11:37:41 AM
Crocus nudiflorus and banaticus are performing well right now.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: pehe on October 16, 2019, 11:48:47 AM
Crocus vallicola from Artvin, Turkey.
Most of them are grown in a open frame, but they are also doing well different places in the open garden.
The pot of seedlings are flowering for the first time this year. They are from own seeds sown July 2016.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Mariette on October 16, 2019, 03:46:32 PM
Mine are not so many and that special, but I like the ethereal colouring of Crocus goulimyi ssp leucanthus.

(https://up.picr.de/37005515fd.jpg)
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Mariette on October 16, 2019, 03:48:22 PM
This Crocus kotschyanus flowered almost white last year, this year it looks more ordinary.

(https://up.picr.de/37005521gl.jpg)
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 16, 2019, 05:36:57 PM
This Crocus kotschyanus flowered almost white last year, this year it looks more ordinary.

(https://up.picr.de/37005521gl.jpg)

Such changes of colours happens from time to time and depends from temperature, fertilizers etc, I collected white Crocus speciosus at Ijevan in Armenia, and this year it bloomed light bluish.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 16, 2019, 05:40:37 PM
Every day I'm taking off old flowers. It is very important to protect corms from rotting. Not so abundantly as before, but still a lot of nice blooms comes out. In this entry 2 samples of crocus mazziaricus/cancellatus s.l. - from Samos Island, Greece and from SW Turkey. After those 3 samples of Crocus cartwrightianus.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Mariette on October 16, 2019, 07:32:35 PM
Such changes of colours happens from time to time and depends from temperature, fertilizers etc, I collected white Crocus speciosus at Ijevan in Armenia, and this year it bloomed light bluish.
Yet itīs still extremely attractive!
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: StevenS on October 16, 2019, 07:54:26 PM
Crocus haussknechtii WHIR-202

Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 17, 2019, 05:33:04 PM
Up to last there were only two autumn blooming species in former Crocus biflorus group - Crocus nerimaniae and C. wattiorum. Both has very limited distribution area and belongs to the best crocuses. On the first 2 pictures are C. nerimaniae. It was very difficult to rise up its stock because in wild it almost 100% is virus infected and another problem is wild boars which eat their corms almost 100% not sorting - virus infected or not - at locus classicus. After 3 generations reproducing it from seeds and destroying all suspicious individuals, finally I think that I now have some stock of healthy plants, at least no one infected were observed this autumn and most likely I will offer this beauty for the first time.
Another is quite difficult in growing C. wattiorum. I lost all stock which I got from Erich Pasche, but stock from P&P Watt - gave good seed crop and now it again is well blooming with me. Both are plants from comparatively low altitudes.
Just recently the third autumn blooming species was found and described by Turkish botanist Osman Erol - Crocus terziogluii. It blooms in December and was found at S coast of Marmaris in Pinus forest. Attached picture is copy from original publication in Phytotaxa. I haven't it and suppose that due low altitudes it could be something problematic, although related C. vaclavii growing in nature at sea coast, grows well with me. Closest relative of new species is C. babadagensis. Another relatives are C. biflorus from Italy and C. rhodensis from Rhodos Island.
The last picture is of Crocus vallicola from near Artvin pictured yesterday in greenhouse and showing great variability of throat colour. It blooms now in outside garden, too, but flowers not open so well, but it is very beautiful even in buds.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 17, 2019, 05:53:42 PM
Only in 2015 I found Crocus serotinus in the wild and now it for the first time blooms with me. The reason of so late blooming after introduction was mistake in soil composition. Only last spring, revisiting locality, I found that soil where it grows in nature is very acid - my mini field laboratory showed pH around 5.0. Now it was planted in rhododendron mix and blooms for the first time.
White form of C. salzmannii was selected between my seedlings, the old albino which I got from Australia, turned virus infected and was destroyed.
Crocus kotschyanus from Gezbeli gec has the largest flowers between all my samples of C. kotschyanus.
Very large flowers has Crocus ligusticus from near Tavarone. I got it from Thomas.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Edgar Wills on October 17, 2019, 08:33:23 PM
Nothing too special in comparison to everything posted so far, but I like them nonetheless.

[attachimg=1]
C. banaticus

[attachimg=2]
C. Cancellatus

[attachimg=3]
Probably C. (pulchellus) Zephyr

[attachimg=4]
C. Speciosus
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Yann on October 20, 2019, 07:24:12 PM
Crocus vallicola from Artvin, Turkey.
Most of them are grown in a open frame, but they are also doing well different places in the open garden.
The pot of seedlings are flowering for the first time this year. They are from own seeds sown July 2016.
I planted several bulbs in different areas of the garden and they grow well under shade as south exposed.

You've a really nice collection Poul.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 21, 2019, 06:02:43 AM
I planted several bulbs in different areas of the garden and they grow well under shade as south exposed.

You've a really nice collection Poul.
Mine Crocus vallicola from old roadside to Zigana pass in my garden yesterday.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: pehe on October 21, 2019, 11:28:39 AM
I planted several bulbs in different areas of the garden and they grow well under shade as south exposed.

You've a really nice collection Poul.

Thank you Yann!

Specially the damp growing crocus like nudiflorus, banaticus and vallicola are doing well in my garden and are self-seeding.
Here is a nice dark Crocus banaticus seedling.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Tristan_He on October 21, 2019, 08:45:17 PM
Sigh.... the autumn crocuses are so pretty. We have had a nice show of Crocus nudiflorus this year, a pity that the rain makes the flowers so short-lived.  :(

Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Gabriela on October 22, 2019, 12:18:51 AM
Many thanks for the inspiration to all who are posting here beautiful Crocus every spring and fall - here's my first Crocus grown from seeds to flower C. banaticus; and it will not be the last, I just sowed C. veluchensis  8)

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 22, 2019, 05:23:24 AM
Thank you Yann!

Specially the damp growing crocus like nudiflorus, banaticus and vallicola are doing well in my garden and are self-seeding.
Here is a nice dark Crocus banaticus seedling.
I'm only rarely planting crocuses in open garden (only few, where I have too large stocks for pots (not more than 4 pots from stock are planted) but I'm not re-using substrate and all used soil goes to garden together with some seeds, some occasional corm which escaped collecting to rise up soil level in too damp spots etc. This autumn a lot of crocuses bloomed in different spots of garden - between rows with my wife's Phlox and hosta beds, between daughters peonies etc. I don't know how permanent will be those which are forming leaves in autumn, but speciosus, pulchellus, nudiflorus, banaticus and even some pallasii this autumn bloomed very well in op4en garden, too.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 22, 2019, 06:21:00 AM
According weather broadcast next week will start night frosts and dropping of temperature up to + 5 C during day. Crocus blooming is not more so abundant as before but a lot still even didn't started. Here and in next entry pictures from Sunday, when we had some sun and very warm day.
The first is quite unusual yellowish C. cartwrightianus from Naxos Island - it blooms extremely abundantly sending up one flower after another. Although pot was labelled as - poorly looking corm - it came up and I hope will alive.
Next is most unusual selection from Crocus goulimyi 'Agia Sophia' found by Melvin Jope, followed by bicoloured 'Harlequin' found in wild by John Fielding.
Then follow first blooming of seedling from Crocus hermoneus collected in Jordan
And as last in this entry Crocus pallasii aff. selection from Chios Island named 'Homeri' in Gothenburg BG.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 22, 2019, 06:51:30 AM
From Crete I described very tiny crocus close to Crocus laevigatus, but well separable by 2 features - the very small size of flowers and absence of scent or even it is unpleasant (each nose is different, personally I can't catch any hint of scent in it). For size of flowers I named it C. pumilus. It keeps small size even in cultivation. Crocus laevigatus from mainland Greece and some other Islands has much larger flowers and they are very sweetly scented.
In autumn 2016 I was in Crete and observed this crocus in full bloom at several localities and everywhere it was typically dwarf and scentless. The largest amount our small group observed near Psychro where is one of several "Cave of Zeus". They were quite variable by colour but identical in their minor size of flowers. Very great was my surprize in autumn 2018 when two colour forms collected side by side in wild, popped out in my pots with very large flowers, by size inseparable from typical laevigatus, but still completely scent-less. I supposed this as occasional but this autumn both repeated the large size. Most interesting that other forms from the same spot (all were collected on some 4-5 sq.m. quite densely covered with flowers of this crocus) still are keeping their dwarf size.
On last 2 pictures the population where those crocuses were collected in the wild.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 22, 2019, 07:02:33 AM
Still are blooming two species from Crocus speciosus group - Crocus ibrahimii (shown earlier) and Crocus sakariensis. Both are from low altitudes and it is quite common that plants from low altitudes even in cultivation blooms later than those from high altitudes same as in wild (of course - this rule is valid for autumn blooming crocuses).
On the first picture C. sakariensis, growing wild at altitudes around 300 m. It is something similar to C. xantholaimos from high altitudes in Central N Turkey. Both are easy separable by branching and position of style - in C. xantholaimos style is much less branched and hidden between anthers, in C. sakariensis - much more branched and positioned much higher. Both has yellow throat, in cultivated forms of xantholaimos much deeper yellow, although in wild are individuals with lighter throat, too.
Then Crocus thomasii seedling, unusually dark, and could be hybrid
And as last is the first albino between C. tournefortii seen by me. It was collected on Karpathos Island in spring 2017 when I searched  for C. ruksansii, but found only C. tournefortii (of course, without flowers).
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 22, 2019, 11:03:21 AM
Another beauty pictured yesterday - crocus from cancellatus group originally collected in Syria before 15 years. It is hand pollinated seedling from original corms.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 24, 2019, 07:07:31 AM
Very few crocuses still didn't start blooming. I'm now ordering my collection lists, labeling pictures, so some earlier made pictures I can show only now. This entry is decided to Crocus puringii growing wild in Crimea (territory of Ukraine at present occupied by Russia).
This species was known for long as Crocus speciosus although already quite long ago (in 1983, C. Brighton et al.) found that it has completely different chromosomes and their number than other "speciosus" crocuses (that means - it is different species) and I decided to name it after Latvian botanist Nikolai Puring (Puriņš) who at change of XIX/XX centuries worked in Crimea and described Crocus tauricus. Observing it in the wild, in most places its stigma overtopped anthers, but there were one group where stigma in all individuals were level with their tips and 2 groups where stigma ended below them. Making randomized collection of flowers (1 from each micro-population (group) - turned than in 11 % stigma was equal or shorter. From each group were collected few corms and kept separately. And it turned that last and this autumn all individuals which in wild had shorter stigmas, in cultivation formed plants with stigma well overtopping anthers. So this (and not only) confirms my suspicion that Kerndorff's use of position of stigma concerning anthers (and counting of position index) has very little value in identification in cases when position is variable. Observation of some spring blooming crocuses showed that position changes and depends from age of flower. It is valid only in cases where greatest part (may be 90+%) of individuals has constant position - below or overtopping. Observations in wild, so important according Kerndorff, not allow to judge about age of observed flowers. Such indexes could be valid only observing all flowers of same age, what is difficult even with cultivated plants, but impossible in wild. Those data will be published later in my "The First Supplement for the World of Crocuses".
The first two pictures show flowers from 2 groups on Tschatir Dag where stigma is equal or below tips. The 3rd picture - the same plant in cultivation, and last two C. puringii from groups where stigma in wild overtopped anthers.
Crocus puringii is one of the earliest bloomers, and now completely finished, but it is very spectacular representative of large and variable Crocus speciosus group.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 25, 2019, 09:19:38 AM
Some more pictures from last week - this very fragrant blue Crocus laevigatus was collected between Crocus harveyi at locus classicus of last on Ikaria Island, E Aegean.
Still abundantly blooms another very fragrant species - Crocus longiflorus from Nebrodi r. Italy
Crocus oreocreticus from Lasiti Plain, Crete is quite variable, here lighter form of it
One of the most beautiful form of Crocus pallasii sensu lato was collected accidentally, out of flowers in spring between ruins of Ariasos, N of Antalya by my friend Vaclav (it is well increasing clone). Population is very strange - some individuals more resemble C. assumaniae, some looks closer to kofudagensis, of course it is not pallasii, what you can see on the last picture - where is true Crocus pallasii from Crimea (Ukraine) - locus classicus of this species.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 26, 2019, 07:15:53 AM
Yesterday according weather broadcast should be full day of sun and it was prognosed as last sunny day during last days of October and start of November. Unfortunately already at midday came dark clouds, started drizzling but I succeed to use some hours for some pictures.
I'm starting with Crocus aleppicus from Syria, collected there before started war and following with new species up to last regarded as C. aleppicus from Israel.
The next pair is Crocus clusii from Ribamondego, Portugal - the first blooming with me. I nature it is growing in extremely acid soil.
The last is white form of Crocus goulimyi.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Tim Harberd on October 26, 2019, 08:57:39 AM
Hi Janis,
   Thanks, once again, for brightening up a rather grey day here...

   On a couple of occasions you've mentioned you daughters peonies... Has she photo-cataloged them? I'd be interested to see how they vary from the cultivars available in 'The West'.

Tim DH
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Yann on October 26, 2019, 11:30:09 AM
The last rains and the caterpillars destroyed many flowers in the garden, hopefully inside the greenhouse it's getting better ;D

Crocus goulimyi
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 26, 2019, 05:32:54 PM
Hi Janis,
   Thanks, once again, for brightening up a rather grey day here...

   On a couple of occasions you've mentioned you daughters peonies... Has she photo-cataloged them? I'd be interested to see how they vary from the cultivars available in 'The West'.

Tim DH
Yes, she has.  I will ask her about link. We have collection of around 300 cultivars. On attached picture part of our Peonies.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 26, 2019, 05:35:13 PM
On this entry - Crocus hermoneus from Jordania and Crocus hyemalis from Israel.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 26, 2019, 05:40:53 PM
In this entry various samples of Crocus laevigatus - now in full bloom. Localities on picture captions.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 27, 2019, 03:02:53 PM
Outside dark, wet and horrible wind. Almost impossible to walk. Closed top windows and tomorrow few side windows will need repairing. Here still pictures from Friday.
The first 4 are from most aromatic autumn bloomer - Crocus longiflorus from Italy. Here you can watch variation of inside base colour.
The last picture - Crocus merlantherus
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: annew on October 27, 2019, 03:39:59 PM
A fantastic selection from Janis, it must smell wonderful in his tunnels. My autumn crocus have only just begun, as I was so late watering them this year. I only have a few, but the scent still brings in the bumblebees.
Below:
A nice white C. pulchellus Michael Hoog
Crocus mathewii HKEP 9291
Crocus laevigatus ssp pumilus AH 0138 (new this year )
My single C. archibaldiorum. I'm patient!
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: annew on October 27, 2019, 03:57:41 PM
This seedling from Crocus hadriaticus Purple Heart Seems to be stable as a 'double' with 8 segments. The photos are from the last 3 years. On the downside - there is still only one corm!
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 28, 2019, 05:05:55 AM
Now last five pictures from last Friday. It seems that for some time there will be no new pictures as temperature today will drop down to minuses in night. May be I will bring some pot inside room to force blooming, but I'm not sure. Always this action caused some problems with following corm crop and all species which still didn't started blooming are rarities. Yesterdays wind + rain destroyed all flowers of outside blooming crocuses.
On Saturday I visited my old place to check by bees (my bees still stay there as around are 2 miles without farming and chemical use). Was surprised seeing in grass blooming of many autumn blooming crocuses regarded by me as not growable here outside. May be milder winters, may be protected by grass... they were not intentionally planted there, but I'm always using old potting mix to level grass, outside beds etc. and quite often some small corm or seeds escape attention and such a way goes to garden. My wife's perennial beds are full with crocuses, corydalis and other bulbs.
On the first picture one of the best of so named "Turkish Crocus pallasii" which of course need own name from surroundings of Labranda (population almost destroyed by wild boars).
Then very tiny form of Crocus pumilus from Crete.
And last 3 pictures are from Crocus tournefortii - the first from Rhodos Island, following two are white forms from Crete, but could be wild hybrids with C. boryi.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 29, 2019, 05:36:17 PM
Today again was sun, although air was cool - only + 4 C and in night offered frost and snowing. But crocuses continue blooming. In this entry hybrid between boryi and tournefortii from Dirk (I don't know is this cross made by him or it comes from wild - I collected similar on Crete)
Crocus caspius now rarely blooms with white flowers, the last ones usually becomes more and more bluish. Both flowers from same stock.
This Crocus cancellatus aff. comes from Syria, 100% reproduces itself from seeds and certainly isn't cancellatus - need own name.
I don't know which one of autumn crocuses will be "champion" in competition for smallest flower. The first candidates could be Cretan pumilus and Crocus cambessedesii shown here.
Although not Crocus - but the first runner for Tulips - every year with me it starts blooming in December, but this season already in October. On picture Tulipa biflora from Kazakhstan  - semi-desert near Chinese  border.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 30, 2019, 10:54:23 AM
The second sunny day. Outside last night temperature dropped to minus 5 but in greenhouse minimum was only minus 0.7 C. Crocuses continue blooming and sun allows to make some pollination and pictures.
At first new species (will be published) from Israel earlier regarded as aleppicus but has several very good features to separate both.
On the second picture typical C. aleppicus from Israel.
Then Crocus cancellatus aff. 14TUS-023 from Sandras Daģi in Mugla province, along road to Denizli.
Earlier I showed C. clusii with very light flowers, in this entry deeper purple toned plant from the same population
and as last - Crocus dilekyarensis described by me from W coast of Turkey - Dilek Yar mountains.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 30, 2019, 02:44:28 PM
Some more pictures of last two days:
Crocus hadriaticus 18GRA-096 from mount-top over Cave of Peramo in N Greece, collected last autumn, blooming but without roots due extremely dry and hot autumn, so well rooted after planting here and grew without any problems forming good flowering size corms just after introduction.
Crocus hatayensis  was described by me. It is related to C. kotschyanus, but has different chromosome number and forms leaves already in autumn during blooming.
Crocus hellenicus from Varnakovo in Greece blooms much later than C. hellenicus from locus classicus in N Greece. I think the best form and as lowland population blooms much later than plants from type location growing in North and at higher altitudes.
Last two pictures are of Crocus hermoneus from Jordania.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 30, 2019, 03:05:54 PM
Here two of speciosus group crocuses which still are blooming.
Crocus polyanthus was named by Grossheim, but never published officially. In wild it is growing in Talish, Azerbaijan. Those plants were collected near Lerik. Their status must be checked by DNA. Seems that they are intermediate between typical C. speciosus from Georgia and Armenia and C. archibaldiorum from Iran.
Next is Crocus sakariensis from low altitudes in NW Turkey, known from only 2 localities,
The last 3 pictures are of Cretan Crocus pumilus. The first picture was made some 2 weeks ago and shows marvellous yellow back of flower segments, the next - the same stock yesterday in full bloom.
And last is Crocus pumilus form which I got from Antoine Hoog.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 30, 2019, 03:11:58 PM
Last entry for today is dedicated to Crocus robertianus. The first 3 pictures are from Northern population, plants growing at altitude 860 m
Last two - from lowland population near Varnakovo. Most interesting is tri-coloured form, not so impressive than sublimis tricolor, but good in any case.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 31, 2019, 09:42:07 AM
Outside temperature around zero. Snow changes to rain and back but in greenhouse  crocuses are still blooming. As flowers are closed, I'm showing pictures from last sunny days and this entry is dedicated to Crocus robertianus. There are 2 something separated areas of this species - on the first 3 pictures are last flowers from Northern area, collected by my Greek friend George at altitude 860 m, last two comes from Southern area near Varnakovo, most interesting is tricolored form - something resembling C. sublimis tricolor, although not so impressive and blooming in autumn.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on October 31, 2019, 09:58:08 AM
Crocus moabiticus usually here blooms at end of November or in December. I have two samples from Jordan and this season one already is in flowers. I collected anthers with pollens, put them in tea-bag and then in the small glass jar with silica gel to be kept into freezer. When another stock will start blooming, pollens will be used for pollination.
Another pair of pictures represents Crocus sativus - the triploid cultivated "species" used for production of saffron. On the first picture sample from Iran, on the 2nd - from Greece.
On last picture - last flowers of Crocus niveus from Peloponnesus in Greece.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on November 01, 2019, 08:02:00 AM
Some more pictures of last week, made still in October:
The first two represents Crocus hyemalis - the first from Israel, the 2nd from Jordan
Then seem to be last flower of Crocus sakariensis
followed by new Crocus species from Turkey
and as last Crocus serotinus from Cabo de Sao Vincence
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on November 01, 2019, 08:11:59 AM
And as last from October -some of speciosus group
Crocus zubovii finished blooming some time ago, but suddenly came up this quite atypical flower
Crocus vallicola bloomed extremely long. On picture selection BLUSHING MARMOT (from Gothenburg BG), it starts white (you can see the last flower - still white - behind two which already "blushed")
Typical Crocus speciosus is growing in Georgia (and partly in Armenia) - on picture sample CMGG-032 from near Gremi church/monastery where it was growing inside dense shrubs
This Iranian Crocus speciosus aff.  was collected for me as single corm by Jill White in "middle of nowhere" in Iran - I long searched in vicinity and didn't found any more at this spot.
Crocus speciosus ALBA finished long ago, it is one of three "oldies" - old Van Tubergen cultivars still grown by me (others are OXONIAN  and  ARTABIR)

Next entries will be under November.
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Tomte on November 01, 2019, 05:01:58 PM
Janis, thank you for showing these amazing photos. I particularly admire the BLUSHING MARMOT. Is it possible that some of their offspring made it to your customers? I think one of the corms I got from you this seasons was clearly blushing, although I'm not sure that it was quite as much as those shown above. Strangely enough, it had only 4 segments - but beautiful nevertheless.

Please let us have more of your photos  :)
Title: Re: Crocus October 2019
Post by: Janis Ruksans on November 02, 2019, 05:15:18 AM
[quote
Janis, thank you for showing these amazing photos. I particularly admire the BLUSHING MARMOT. Is it possible that some of their offspring made it to your customers? I think one of the corms I got from you this seasons was clearly blushing, although I'm not sure that it was quite as much as those shown above. Strangely enough, it had only 4 segments - but beautiful nevertheless.

Please let us have more of your photos  :)
[/quote]

When Blushing Marmot started blooming this autumn, I was afraid that in some mysterious way were mixed labels of two different vallicola stocks as another pot two rows further bloomed with typically "blushed" flowers, but pot bringing label of BM was with white flowers. It was great mystery for me - how it was possible to mix those labels. But after few days those white flowers started to blush. Both stocks came from Artvin - only BM I got from Gothenburg BG where it was named by Henrik Zetterlund (originally came from Kletzing), but another was collected by Antoine Hoog & Erich Pasche (AHEP-8328) - both near Artvin.
Relating number of flower segments - it depends from conditions during summer - when ontogenesis of next flower happens in but of replacement corm. This summer was strange - starting very hot it changed to unusually cool in mid and again was followed by long hot wave. Many autumn crocuses blooms a little strangely and not in "normal" line - flowers has misplaced and wrong number of parts and sometimes even shape,