Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Flowers and Foliage Now => Topic started by: ruweiss on March 04, 2020, 07:10:39 PM

Title: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 04, 2020, 07:10:39 PM
Now flowering:
Bergenia emeiensis
Draba hispanica (I am not sure, if this is the correct name, maybe
the experts know more)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 05, 2020, 08:00:12 AM
Nice plants Rudi! I can't tell you whether the name of the Draba is correct or not but it looks nice.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 06, 2020, 06:27:57 PM
Here in the mountains the spring has not arrived yet. The snow will last for 1-2 more months.

Common birch Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii

[attachimg=1]


Norway spruce Picea abies

[attachimg=2]


Scots pine Pinus sylvestris - a natural dwarf.

[attachimg=3]


The highest "mountain" in the background is 1212 m.

[attachimg=4]


In a few years the spruce will take over completely.

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 07, 2020, 01:05:49 AM
Here in the mountains the spring has not arrived yet. The snow will last for 1-2 more months.


Glad that you can finally enjoy some real winter Trond! It looks very serene.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ArnoldT on March 07, 2020, 01:58:20 AM
 

the blue sky is amazing.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: WSGR on March 07, 2020, 08:21:35 AM
Stunning snow scenes!

Fritillaria Raddeana is very happy

[attach=2]

[attach=1]

After a WHOLE day of rain came sunshine and warmth yesterday!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 07, 2020, 04:27:55 PM
Glad that you can finally enjoy some real winter Trond! It looks very serene.

Yes, real winter!

And a real cold winter morning! The birches are blooming ;)

[attachimg=1]


[attachimg=2]


[attachimg=3]

And so is the ground.

[attachimg=4]

Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 07, 2020, 11:43:36 PM
Stunning snow scenes!
Fritillaria Raddeana is very happy

After a WHOLE day of rain came sunshine and warmth yesterday!

Very nice and bright Fritillaria!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 07, 2020, 11:44:25 PM
Yes, real winter!

And a real cold winter morning! The birches are blooming ;)

Sparkling blooms  :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 08, 2020, 12:03:58 PM
Proper winter Trond!

Here we have had gales, rain, and a very occasional light frost... on the whole I prefer a bit of snow and ice.

In the garden things are moving on slowly, the saxifrages are looking very nice and there are still some late snowdrops but we haven't had the warmth to move many of the later things on much.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

One of the Saxifraga x boydii clones - I think it may be 'sulphurea' but am happy to be corrected!

[attachimg=4]

Dentaria kitaibelii. These plants are very under-utilised in gardens in my opinion, they flower really early and offer a nice contrast to bulbs.

[attachimg=5]

Dentaria pentahyllos just emerging from the ground.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 08, 2020, 12:11:11 PM
The purple saxifrages are also peaking now. Saxifraga oppositifolia does very well for me now I have learned how to grow it - basically it needs a north-facing crevice where it won't get cooked in a hot summer.

[attachimg=1]

This clump is jammed into a crevice between some granite steps.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

Battle of the saxifrages - oppositifolia vs Gregor Mendel

[attachimg=4]

This is a bit higher up the rockery but it still seems to have a cool enough root run to be ok.

[attachimg=5]

The white form, on the other hand, is a bit of a waste of time - weak growing and shy flowering.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Stefan B. on March 08, 2020, 03:12:06 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/op8aW9L.jpg)
Corylus avellana 'Contorta'
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 08, 2020, 07:51:57 PM
Saxifrages look so pretty, Tristan. 

It has been cold nights again, but days have been sunny and about +5C, very nice.
Snowdrops are doing well, and many Crocuses and even Corydalis are coming up a month earlier than normally.
I have Hellebores and Hepaticas still under protection of spruce brances because of cold nights, and I don't want them to advance too much yet. Adonis amurensis is also coming up. Hepatica nobilis is still safely in bud (though I heard today that someone has already found it flowering, but not in my area), but H.japonica and H.pubescens flowers are reaching up.

Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Stefan B. on March 08, 2020, 08:00:15 PM
Great photos, Leena!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 08, 2020, 09:01:27 PM
Thanks to all for the beautiful pictures.Wish,that I could cultivate Sax. oppositifolia
so successful in my hot garden. 30 years ago i had no bigger problems with these
beauties, but in the meantime the summers got hotter and hotter.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 09, 2020, 02:16:03 AM
It really looks like spring in other countries! Beautiful pictures.

The Corylus 'Contorta' is spectacular Stefan.

Really amazing how advanced everything is Leena! I spotted few Corydalis at ground level where the snow melted, and some are germinating, but that's all.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 09, 2020, 06:57:33 AM
Proper winter Trond!

Here we have had gales, rain, and a very occasional light frost... on the whole I prefer a bit of snow and ice.

In the garden things are moving on slowly, the saxifrages are looking very nice and there are still some late snowdrops but we haven't had the warmth to move many of the later things on much.

 These plants are very under-utilised in gardens in my opinion, they flower really early and offer a nice contrast to bulbs.



Tristan,

Your winter seems to have been just like ours!

You really have some nice Saxes!  And I agree regarding Dentaria. It is one of my favorite genera :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 09, 2020, 06:59:52 AM
.....

It has been cold nights again, but days have been sunny and about +5C, very nice.
Snowdrops are doing well, and many Crocuses and even Corydalis are coming up a.......

Very nice Leena! Looks like a beautiful spring!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 09, 2020, 08:25:00 AM
Thank you all.  :) Last time we had an early spring in 2014, I hope I don't have to wait for another early spring for six years again.
Cold nights slow plants down, which is good, and so far I haven't seen any serious damage by it.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 09, 2020, 11:48:28 PM
Thanks to all for the beautiful pictures.Wish,that I could cultivate Sax. oppositifolia
so successful in my hot garden. 30 years ago i had no bigger problems with these
beauties, but in the meantime the summers got hotter and hotter.

Hmm... yes I can see that would be a problem  :( I will enjoy mine while I can - still they survived the heat and drought here (about 30C for several weeks, streams drying up etc) 2 years ago surprisingly well. But climate change is a problem for alpine plants both in the wild and in gardens.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 09, 2020, 11:50:30 PM
Lots of good things to come Leena, it looks like the Secret Garden!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 11, 2020, 05:08:26 PM
Today in the garden.

Cardamine pentaphylla, pink

[attachimg=1]


[attachimg=2]


[attachimg=3]



Corydalis solida

[attachimg=4]


Rhododendron barbatum

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: David Nicholson on March 11, 2020, 07:08:51 PM
Cracking photographs Trond.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 11, 2020, 07:29:05 PM
Cracking photographs Trond.

Thank you David :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 12, 2020, 12:03:13 AM
Today in the garden.

The Cardamine is complementing well the Corydalis Trond; something I still have to add to my garden.

Is this the Rhodo you were saying will bloom first time? Gorgeous red.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 12, 2020, 07:54:25 AM
Tristan, thank you. :)

Trond, Cardamines look very nice. I'm looking forward to mine coming up.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 12, 2020, 04:56:52 PM
The Cardamine is complementing well the Corydalis Trond; something I still have to add to my garden.

Is this the Rhodo you were saying will bloom first time? Gorgeous red.

You should have some Cardamine, Gabriela!

And yes, it is the same rhodo.


...

Trond, Cardamines look very nice. I'm looking forward to mine coming up.

Probably quite soon. I an crossing my fingers ;)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 13, 2020, 12:23:41 AM
You should have some Cardamine, Gabriela!
And yes, it is the same rhodo.

They are not to be found here Trond, and I never managed to catch seeds of the natives ones. I planted few young C. enneaphylla last fall, hopefully they'll show up later in the spring.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 13, 2020, 06:25:48 AM
They are not to be found here Trond, and I never managed to catch seeds of the natives ones. I planted few young C. enneaphylla last fall, hopefully they'll show up later in the spring.

Well, we can see what can be done about that Gabriela  ;)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: GordonT on March 13, 2020, 06:45:33 PM
Spring is ahead of schedule, here in southwestern Nova Scotia. The wind is currently howling like a banshee, but the snow is gone, and plants are primed for bloom. This is our earliest showing for Hamamelis x intermedia.

[attachimg=1]

The two plants were supposed to be a grouping of 'Arnold Promise' and 'Jelena'. Arnold is on the left, Jelena is the larger plant, and she didn't get the message about proper flower colour.

Pulsatillas are starting to show buds, but it will be a while before they are lensworthy. The driveway turnabout is planted with a mix of heaths, heathers and various conifers (Pinus parviflora 'Ibocan', Cedrus atlantica glauca...). Erica carnea 'Springwood White, and 'Vivellii' have begun to open. They will be crawling with bees in a few more days.

[attachimg=2]

On the north side of the house, Viburnum x bodnantense 'Dawn' is also primed to deliver its best showing to date. I still wonder why this isn't more commonly grown in the area.

[attachimg=3]

The morning began quiet enough, with a not all that common visit from some geese in transit.

[attachimg=4]

They rarely stay long, mainly because the dogs like to get them to fly. We kept the pups inside for part of the morning... at least the flock had time enough for a swim in the pond.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 13, 2020, 11:09:39 PM
Wow - that's a beautiful sight from Nova Scotia Gordon! Spring is on its way in Ontario as well.

Well, we can see what can be done about that Gabriela  ;)

Thanks Trond :) I'll also see maybe I can do better about the native ones.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 15, 2020, 08:12:37 AM
My first small C.coum is flowering! :) it is grown from seed ex seeds from 2016, and has been planted in the ground for two year now, and survived. I have covered it with dry leaves during cold nights, I don't think it could have survived -13C when in bud otherwise (without snow).
In the background there is G.lagodechianus.
Trillium nivale was also sown in summer 2016 from fresh seeds, and the seedlings are now going to flower for the first time. :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 10:44:55 AM
Some cardamines this morning - in sunshine, for once!
C quinquefolia - this is the first time that I have seen this flower well. Usually some creature - pheasant? wood pigeon? vole? pecks off all the flower buds! A spreader, but what a delight.
C pentaphylla - always beautiful, a clumper, does not rampage everywhere.
C kitaibeli - often described as white, but really there is a touch of cream in the flowers.
C heptaphylla - usually slightly later, this one is just starting and is pure white.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 10:48:54 AM
And lastly Cardamine  glandulifera, which I was told would take a while to settle and make a nice display. Well,it must  be 5 yrs at least and only ever a couple of flowers. No sign of buds yet. Is it destined for the compost heap? Mmmm.
Does anyone else have experience with this plant?
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 01:33:45 PM
Corydalis malkensis is at last seeding around the garden, here with Anemone blanda.
[attachimg=1]

Helionopsis japonica is a super plant - and easy to propagate too, from leaf cuttings.
[attachimg=2]

Erythronium dens-canis makes a nice combination with a dark leaf primula.
[attachimg=3]

I love these wee puschkinias,  with the darker blue down the middle of each petal.
[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gail on March 16, 2020, 05:30:14 PM
Helionopsis japonica is a super plant - and easy to propagate too, from leaf cuttings.
I wouldn't have thought of that. Has anyone ever tried Erythronium from leaf cuttings??
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 16, 2020, 06:05:38 PM
Inspiring spring images Carolyn!

My first small C.coum is flowering! :) it is grown from seed ex seeds from 2016, and has been planted in the ground for two year now, and survived. I have covered it with dry leaves during cold nights, I don't think it could have survived -13C when in bud otherwise (without snow).
In the background there is G.lagodechianus.
Trillium nivale was also sown in summer 2016 from fresh seeds, and the seedlings are now going to flower for the first time. :)

Congrats Leena!
I have few C. coum leaves in the garden, I'll watch them closely, who knows...
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 16, 2020, 06:23:00 PM
I wouldn't have thought of that. Has anyone ever tried Erythronium from leaf cuttings??
No, we  haven't - I think we'll try this  season though! More  in  hope than expectation - with bulbs it  seems  unlikely.  May be  possible  to  get  some  growth, but  would  it  make  a  bulb to live  on?

Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gail on March 16, 2020, 06:35:21 PM
with bulbs it  seems  unlikely. 
but Eucomis do quite readily.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 07:54:01 PM
I will rush out and sacrifice some erythronium leaves tomorrow! You are right, Gail, I have had great success with eucomis from leaf cuttings.
By the way, leaf cuttings work for Ypsilindra too  - they are similar in to Helionopsis.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 07:58:11 PM
Now a couple of shrubs from today:
First, one of my very favourites - Stachyurus 'Joy Forever'. I planted it in front of a holly tree, so that the pale flowers would shine out against a dark background

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 16, 2020, 08:14:42 PM
And lastly Cardamine  glandulifera, which I was told would take a while to settle and make a nice display. Well,it must  be 5 yrs at least and only ever a couple of flowers. No sign of buds yet. Is it destined for the compost heap? Mmmm.
Does anyone else have experience with this plant?

I have had it now for maybe six or seven years, and it doesn't form so thick mat of leaves as yours but flowers every spring (until some rabbits eat it, this has happened now twice). But I don't know why yours don't flower..

You have so nice spring garden! :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 16, 2020, 08:16:35 PM
I have few C. coum leaves in the garden, I'll watch them closely, who knows...

Mine showed the flower bud already in January and I was worried about it, because we didn't have any snow this year, but it has survived so far and started to flower last week.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ashley on March 16, 2020, 08:44:27 PM
Some cardamines this morning ...

Lovely to see these Carolyn.  Thank you.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 16, 2020, 09:42:10 PM
I have had it now for maybe six or seven years, and it doesn't form so thick mat of leaves as yours but flowers every spring (until some rabbits eat it, this has happened now twice). But I don't know why yours don't flower..

You have so nice spring garden! :)
Thank you,  Leena.
I wonder if some sulphate of potash might encourage the cardamine to flower next year?
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Steve Garvie on March 16, 2020, 10:43:51 PM
Saxifraga oppositifolia
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49667704202_d0cd16d47f_o_d.jpg)

Gentiana oschtenica
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49667417556_dce05db8e5_o_d.jpg)

Callianthemum anemonoides
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49667695317_039b91f802_o_d.jpg)

Saxifraga x dinninaris
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49667704482_c860bfc1d1_o_d.jpg)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 17, 2020, 03:48:51 PM
Just a couple more photos from yesterday's sunny morning:
Daphne mezereum.
Hellebore - from the seed exchange a few years ago.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Stefan B. on March 17, 2020, 03:57:15 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/fCuzgKH.jpg)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leucogenes on March 20, 2020, 04:52:23 PM
Callianthemum farreri... today.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: David Nicholson on March 20, 2020, 05:03:55 PM
Nice one Thomas.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 20, 2020, 05:20:26 PM
From Ian Christie: "We have to stay near home so no shows here are pictures from today first pulsatilla this morning with frost then same plant this afternoon."

[attachimg=1]


[attachimg=2]


[attachimg=3]
Daphne blagyana

[attachimg=4]
 Ipeion

[attachimg=5]
Saxifraga oppositifolia
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 20, 2020, 05:23:01 PM
again from Ian Christie ....

[attachimg=1]
 Sax porophylla

[attachimg=2]
 Erythronium Spinners


[attachimg=3]
Pulsatilla vernalis


[attachimg=4]
Galanthus plicatus
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 20, 2020, 05:26:46 PM
From elsewhere .... this  by  Bernd  Sommer,

Adonis amurensis (the true, fertile one)
[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leucogenes on March 20, 2020, 05:46:27 PM
Nice one Thomas.

Thank you, David...

 I was very surprised to see Callianthemum farreri again. There were only two small leaves last year and I thought I was going to lose it.

Also Androsace ciliata brings some color to this evening over there...

Everyone here... stay healthy
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 20, 2020, 05:52:35 PM
From elsewhere (FB) by  Kirsten Andersen in Denmark a  view  of  her alpine  house  .... Primulas and in the background Tropaeolum hookerianum ssp atropurpurescens

[attachimg=1]


 From Gerd Knoche :

[attachimg=2]
 The smaller flowers here received as Narcissus x susannae ex Almorox. The larger one is x susannae ( own collection decades ago)
 
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Yann on March 20, 2020, 06:21:56 PM
Flowers bring such joy in this sad period, Anemone slavica under sunshine
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 20, 2020, 09:41:55 PM
Magnolias are in full flower, but the weather forecast is night frosts for the
coming nights.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 20, 2020, 09:52:25 PM
One of my Paraquilegia microphylla seedlings from last year gives me much pleasure
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 20, 2020, 10:03:15 PM
Sorry for the wrong name of the picture of the primulas in the Alpine House
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 21, 2020, 05:13:47 PM
Wonderful plants again to see in the pictures. :)

Just a couple more photos from yesterday's sunny morning:
Daphne mezereum.

It has been flowering here also all March. :) It is a wonder how it can cope with many cold nights, and still continue to flower.
Another flower which seems to be hardier than I thought, is C.coum. Last week one night I forgot to put a cover over it for the night, and it was -6C, but it was fine, and continued to flower like there was no cold nights.
Last night was also -6 and this night may be even colder. During the day it was barely above zero.
Still, all plants seemed to be fine.
I'm happy that Crocus herbertii has started to increase. Or at least this plant was bought with that name.
Last week one day was very sunny and +7, Crocus tommasinianus 'Roseus' opened it's flowers all the way.
Picture of snowdrops from that same day, bigger 'Atkinsii' and smaller 'Washfield Warham'.
Hepatica nobilis is close to starting to flower, this one grows in a very warm bank in the edge of the garden.
 
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leucogenes on March 21, 2020, 05:27:52 PM
One of my Paraquilegia microphylla seedlings from last year gives me much pleasure

Hello dear Rudi...

what a majestic beauty... your Paraquilegia microphylla . My admiration for it. Also my specimens have survived the mild winter very well and sprout abundantly...both in the Alpinum and under glass. But I have not yet discovered the beginnings of flowers.

Still much joy with it.  :D
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Yann on March 21, 2020, 06:56:13 PM
One of my Paraquilegia microphylla seedlings from last year gives me much pleasure

Whaou, great little jewel which i'm not able to grow here.

Aubrieta deltoidea 'Gloria' in the dryest part of the garden and unknown Euphorbia cultivar
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 21, 2020, 08:56:03 PM
Dear friends, many thanks for your friendly comments, the flowers of the
Paraquilegia appeared very quick. I wonder how long these plants will resist the conditions
in my hot garden, which is really not the ideal place for them.
Last year I kept the potted seedlings in a shaded frame and noted that they started
to wilt during the hottest days but recovered slowly when they were back again in the shaded
 and ventilated alpine house.
Leena, Daphne mezereum is also native in our region and I have  never noted any damage
by late frosts.
Our Cyclamen coum spread in the last 25 years all over the meadow in our garden. Some years ago after a
outstanding frosty night all the flowers were black, but our disappointment turned to joy
when the flowers appeared again after some weeks.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 21, 2020, 09:13:58 PM
Great spring pictures from all!
Nothing special here but although still cold during the day (-2C) the first Iris reticulatas are blooming and the Crocus flowers opened.
We can only hope for more sun!

Crocus 'Blue Pearl'
[attachimg=1]
Iris 'Katharine Hodgkin'
[attachimg=2]
Iris 'Eye Catcher'
[attachimg=3]
Iris 'Chameleon'
[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 22, 2020, 03:48:01 PM
... and unknown Euphorbia cultivar

I like this one, Yann!

...
Nothing special here but although still cold during the day (-2C) the first Iris reticulatas are blooming and the Crocus flowers opened.
We can only hope for more sun!



Gabriela, always nice when the flowers opens in spring!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 22, 2020, 03:54:43 PM
A few flowers from today.

[attachimg=1]

Helleborus argutifolius


[attachimg=2]

Unknown Corydalis


[attachimg=3]

Primula marginata


[attachimg=4]

Unknown Saxifraga hybrid


[attachimg=5]

Primula auricula
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 22, 2020, 04:00:23 PM
A few more

[attachimg=1]

Primula denticulata


[attachimg=2]

heloniopsis orientalis white


[attachimg=3]

Soldanella alpina


[attachimg=4]

Shortia uniflora


[attachimg=5]

Shortia uniflora
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 22, 2020, 04:33:05 PM
Gabriela, you are catching up fast and soon are ahead of us. :) Isn't this great time of year!
Trond, very nice Shortia. My one plant usually flowers in late May, it is struggling for some reason. I grew it from seeds some years ago, and in the beginning I had over ten seedlings, now only one is left. :(

Leena, Daphne mezereum is also native in our region and I have  never noted any damage
by late frosts.

Here are my plants, white and pink, today, after -8C last night. :)
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 22, 2020, 08:38:55 PM
A few more
All super nice Trond!

Leena - yes, it is starting! And you're right, soon maybe ahead :) In April we can get steady temperatures above 15C or more, it is not very desirable but it can happen.
Lovely Daphnes, I can virtually feel their fragrance. I am still crying after my 3 year old plant eaten to the ground; I never imagine someone would be attracted to it.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: David Nicholson on March 22, 2020, 09:41:07 PM
Lovely selection Trond. I particularly liked the Shortia, not a plant I’ve ever been successful with.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 23, 2020, 06:50:47 AM
....
Trond, very nice Shortia. My one plant usually flowers in late May, it is struggling for some reason. I grew it from seeds some years ago, and in the beginning I had over ten seedlings, now only one is left. :(

Here are my plants, white and pink, today, after -8C last night. :)

Leena, I had also many seedlings some years ago and lost them all. I found out that I had planted them in a place that got too dry during summer. They didn't like it at all and died in a few years. It is much moister where they grow now. (I have bought a few plants as I didn't want to wait too long for flowers!)

Nice Daphnes you have! I remember Daphne from the forests around Oslo. Here they are only in gardens.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 23, 2020, 06:53:40 AM
All super nice Trond!

.....

Thanks Gabriela.

Lovely selection Trond. I particularly liked the Shortia, not a plant I’ve ever been successful with.

Thank you David. - Maybe it is to hot in your garden?
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gail on March 24, 2020, 07:52:41 AM
Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Rubra' - I love the jewel-like blooms of Pasque flowers.
[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: olegKon on March 24, 2020, 09:18:16 AM
After nearly no winter here (for Moscow, of course) we are having a very early spring. Flowers open gradually which is unusual for us. The common thing is to have early bulbs flowering together. Now it is the European way.

1. Adonis ramosum (I believe)
[attachimg=1]

2. Adonis amurensis
[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 25, 2020, 05:35:28 PM
I  just  had  to bring  these  photos from Sue  Simpson and  George  Watt on South West  Scotland  ....

[attachimg=1]
Not a bad place to self isolate !

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The evolution of man, rising from the swamp! George's words, not mine, says Sue !


Not exactly Venus rising from the waves, but possibly the best we can hope for! Good work, George!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 26, 2020, 11:36:23 AM
Sue  Simpson thinks this  is  definitely  peak flowering  time  .....

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 26, 2020, 01:41:16 PM
From the  garden of  Anne  Wright  in Yorkshire 

[attachimg=1]
Androsace carnea in a trough.

[attachimg=2]
Astriet Group daffodils from Brian Duncan

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Crocus minimus 'Little Girl'

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Fritillaria meleagris dark form from Dordogne

[attachimg=5]
Honey bee on x Chionoscilla
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 26, 2020, 01:44:29 PM
more  photos  from AnneW

[attachimg=1]
Listen to the buzz! Prunus sargentii.

[attachimg=2]
Memrina Group daffodils from Brian Duncan

[attachimg=3]
Narcissi Tuesday's Child front, Rapture behind, Warber even further back.

[attachimg=4]
Narcissus 'Kaffry'

[attachimg=5]
Oops, can't remember..
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: annew on March 26, 2020, 01:45:18 PM
Thanks, Maggi. You beat me to it!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 26, 2020, 01:47:22 PM
four more  from Anne W - thought  she  might  be  too busy  for this herself!! :-*

[attachimg=1]
Trillium rivale in a shady corner

[attachimg=2]
Self sown primroses and Anemone blanda


 two views of  Self sown celandines (Ficaria verna)
[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 26, 2020, 01:49:10 PM
Trying to be  useful, Anne!! :P
 I think my favourites are  the  self sown celandines ( which I'm not  normally  too keen on!) and  the  truly lovely  combo of the  Primroses with the  anemones. Soooo pretty!  Thank you!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ian mcdonald on March 26, 2020, 02:41:37 PM
It,s sunny and warm here today so I,ve been sitting in the back garden with a cup of tea and watching the wildlife. Just like last year a frost has affected the new leaves on the Pieris. Primula farinosa is in flower. Clematis armandii has a lovely scent. The front "lawn" has fritillary,s and primroses in flower. Several butterflies have been seen, including this peacock which stopped to sunbath. Among the birds were chaffinch, goldfinch, sparrow hawk and buzzard.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

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Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: johnw on March 26, 2020, 04:05:47 PM
An extraordinary garden!

Perhaps St. François de Paule after an unsuccessful crossing?

john
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ian mcdonald on March 26, 2020, 07:38:22 PM
Thanks John, I try to grow a wide range of plants but the garden is small.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 27, 2020, 10:33:03 AM
My Stachyurus Joy Forever is fully out now. There are more flowers on the left hand side - the ferocious February gales blew lots of the buds from the right hand, exposed side. Still super anyway!

And yet again the file is too big to post....
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Ian Y on March 27, 2020, 11:07:15 AM
Carolyn, we  are  finding  our  connections are  slow these  days  so perhaps that is a  factor  in loading  your  images. May  just  be  easier to resize them yourself  960 pixels  wide  usually  works -  or  use  the  old resizing system.
Lots  of  things are  not  as they could- or  should  be  right now !
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: annew on March 27, 2020, 12:31:31 PM
Trying to be  useful, Anne!! :P
 I think my favourites are  the  self sown celandines ( which I'm not  normally  too keen on!) and  the  truly lovely  combo of the  Primroses with the  anemones. Soooo pretty!  Thank you!
So, basically, the things that did it themselves!  ;D ;D
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 27, 2020, 12:39:55 PM
So, basically, the things that did it themselves!  ;D ;D
Well,  yes!!   I find that  the  more  natural ( self-sowing )  combos  arising in our  garden are  the  ones  which give the  most  pleasure  these days  !
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hannelore on March 27, 2020, 01:01:01 PM
Simpel windflower
[attachimg=2]

Just spring
[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 27, 2020, 03:45:35 PM
Very nice to see so much color from everyone's gardens; still a bit behind here.
Especially the yellow/blue combinations are gorgeous!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leucogenes on March 27, 2020, 05:15:57 PM
Townsendia spathulata... sown in winter 17/18
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on March 27, 2020, 07:26:23 PM
From Alan Gardner in Falkirk ....

[attachimg=1]
Erythronium dens-canis coming into flower


[attachimg=2]
Lots of early spring colour on the rockery.

[attachimg=3]
Narcissus watieri does well under cold glass.

[attachimg=4]
Hepatica x Media Millstream Merlin doing well in a north facing trough
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 05:38:08 PM
Quite a few nice bits and pieces in the garden now..

[attachimg=1]

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A couple of nice little Hepatica seedlings from Anne Wright - this is the first time they have flowered.

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Cardamine pentaphyllos now in full flower.

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Narcissus asturiensis.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 05:44:37 PM
[attachimg=1]

Shoots of Paeonia mlokesewitchii (and yes, I have a big celandine problem!)

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A very good Corydalis solida.

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Scilla bifolia 'Alba'

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Corydalis marschalliana. Although I'm very fond of Corydalis I can't say this is my favourite. It seems to like it here though.

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A Saxifraga hybrid - I think it might be 'Louis Armstrong'?
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 05:53:50 PM
[attachimg=1]

Chionodoxa sardensis. I have loads of this, it likes to seed around and I am more than happy to let it. The bright blue flowers are stunning en masse in spring.

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A primrose, easy to overlook but still one of my favourites.

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Saxifraga scardica.

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Bud of Muscari latifolium. This also likes to seed around and is always welcome.

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Saxifraga ferdinandi-coburgi. I thought this was not going to flower very well this year, but it seems to have put on a spurt. I like that it flowers a bit after the main peak of the early saxes.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 06:12:37 PM
[attachimg=1]

Saxifrages in the dry stone wall.

[attachimg=2]

I really like how they find their way into the crevices in this situation.

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Erythronium hendersonii. I think this may be my favourite of this beautiful genus.

[attachimg=4]

This one was bought from Pitcairn Nursery as an E. hendersonii hybrid, but I can't tell much difference - maybe the pollen is sterile though? It's a good vigorous plant anyway.

[attachimg=5]

E. 'Craigton Cream'
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 06:30:04 PM
[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Erythronium revolutum... actually maybe this is my favourite? Sadly something ate through the main clump of this one in the garden so the display is not so good this year. Fortunately there are plenty of seedlings coming on in the garden and in pots.

[attachimg=3]

Opening buds of Salix nakamurana var. yezoalpina.

[attachimg=4]

This forms a sort of strange mat-forest with the leaf litter of the dead leaves immediately below the new growth. Actually the more I look at this patch, the more it looks like a bulb planting opportunity!

[attachimg=5]

x Chionoscilla allenii. This came from Janis some years ago, and it does pretty well here in wet North Wales.

Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 28, 2020, 06:44:11 PM
[attachimg=1]

Mukdenia rossii. This needs moving really - I had to evict it from another spot a couple of years ago and just bunged it here. 

[attachimg=2]

Corydalis 'Kingfisher'. I picked this up a couple of weeks ago at Aberconwy just before the lockdown - hope it survives!

[attachimg=3]

I think this is Chionodixa forbesii - it really is an exceptionally beautiful plant.

[attachimg=4]

Callianthemum anemonoides. Mine is not as stunning as one or two others posted here! Even so I have been really impressed with this and bought a couple more for the rockery last year to make a bit of a patch.

[attachimg=5]

Tulipa humilis, always the first of the tulips here.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 28, 2020, 08:32:11 PM
Lovely selection, Tristan. You must be a week or two ahead of us in Scotland, I haven't seen my mukdenia yet or any of the blue corydalis. Super photos.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on March 28, 2020, 10:07:59 PM
Very nice, Tristan. You have a lot of nice flowers!

Here are two colour forms of common toothwort. They are native here. It is not from my garden though.

[attachimg=1]


[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 29, 2020, 12:28:57 PM
Love the toothwort Trond! I tried to establish some in my garden a couple of years ago but I haven't seen it so suppose it didn't take.

The flowers tend to look better in close-up.... I need to work on propagating some of them really to make larger clumps. Actually it was worth taking the photos so I could appreciate some of them better too!
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 29, 2020, 12:34:23 PM
Lovely selection, Tristan. You must be a week or two ahead of us in Scotland, I haven't seen my mukdenia yet or any of the blue corydalis. Super photos.

The blue Corydalis is a bit of a cheat really Carolyn, nursery stock is always a bit earlier. It's a beautiful thing though isn't it? This is my second one, the other is 'Craigton Blue' which is very vigorous here, almost to the point of being a problem! I think the flowers on 'Kingfisher' are a bit bigger though.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 29, 2020, 01:11:25 PM
Tristan, you ought to try Corydalis Blue Heron - it has nice foliage.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 29, 2020, 01:54:45 PM
Tristan, you ought to try Corydalis Blue Heron - it has nice foliage.

I did - it died though  :( . Maybe I'll have another go in a different place.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gail on March 29, 2020, 07:20:25 PM
The blue Corydalis is a bit of a cheat really Carolyn, nursery stock is always a bit earlier. It's a beautiful thing though isn't it? This is my second one, the other is 'Craigton Blue' which is very vigorous here, almost to the point of being a problem! I think the flowers on 'Kingfisher' are a bit bigger though.
My 'Kingfisher' bought at the AGS East Anglian show in 2018 is also flowering. Has been extremely long flowering here with some flower as late as October last year.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 29, 2020, 08:18:34 PM
I will have to try Kingfisher too - it would be nice to have an early flowering one.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ruweiss on March 29, 2020, 09:02:59 PM
Flowering now:
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Roma on March 29, 2020, 09:25:58 PM
Daphne retusa.  The south side gets wind and sun.  The north side is more sheltered.



[attachimg=2]
North side


[attachimg=1]





Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 30, 2020, 06:04:28 PM
Lot of interesting flowers posted lately! :)

Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Rubra' - I love the jewel-like blooms of Pasque flowers.

That is really pretty, so jewel-like! :)

After nearly no winter here (for Moscow, of course) we are having a very early spring. Flowers open gradually which is unusual for us. The common thing is to have early bulbs flowering together. Now it is the European way.

It has been just like that over here this year, too. And a strange weather, one week is colder, then milder then colder again, so all plants take their time to start to flower.
Last week was relatively warm, one day even +10C and all snowdrops and crocuses were full open.
Then today it looks like this in the same spot. :o Though it is good, because this night will be cold and snow will melt away in a few days when it becomes a bit warmer again.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gabriela on March 30, 2020, 09:18:06 PM
Beautiful large Daphnes Roma. They look like sending an invitation to start some cuttings :)

Leena - what a contrast! In a way it is best that the cold and snow came sooner rather than later. Spring evolves slow here, which is good.
More reticulatas are showing up and flowering.
[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Leena on March 31, 2020, 03:57:47 PM
Leena - what a contrast! In a way it is best that the cold and snow came sooner rather than later. Spring evolves slow here, which is good.

It was so good that the snow came, because last night it was -11C, and now my hellebores and Hepatica japonicas are protected under snow. Though I'm glad when it  warms up again. :)
Slow spring is good, sometimes spring is over in just a few weeks here.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on March 31, 2020, 10:11:13 PM
Iris lazica has been covered in flowers for weeks now. i read in a nursery catalogue that you should cut off the long leaves to show the flowers off nicely. Has anyone tried this? I think it might look rather unsightly with chopped back leaves. I am going to split my clump this year and will try trimming the leaves on one of the new plants next winter.

Pulsatillas are such lovely plants....

This acer is always the first in leaf and has super colour now and again in autumn. An unnamed end-of-season bargain from B & Q or somewhere. I think it may have cost me £2.50!

A narrow leaved pulmonaria, label lost.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tristan_He on March 31, 2020, 10:32:31 PM
A narrow leaved pulmonaria, label lost.

Could this be P. longifolia Carolyn? This is so beautiful, it is one of very few plants that hits that intense gentian blue.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Carolyn on April 01, 2020, 01:04:55 PM
Tristan,

I think it is probably pulmonaria longifolia - a quick search online has not suggested any other narrow-leaved alternatives. The colour is wonderful, I can never resist proper gentian-blue flowers.
Title: Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Gerdk on April 01, 2020, 06:15:38 PM
Magnolia stellata - just opened
and two days later after - 5° C during the night

Gerd