Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Flowers and Foliage Now => Topic started by: art600 on August 01, 2008, 12:52:41 AM

Title: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 01, 2008, 12:52:41 AM
I am surprised at how early my Hibiscus are this year.  The white one has easily in excess of a thousand flowers in spite of being hard pruned every year.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 01, 2008, 08:03:54 AM
Everything is topsy-turvy again.  We have first Michaelmas Daisy and last night had our first Autumn Raspberries and Blackberries!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 01, 2008, 12:31:58 PM
Another plant in my garden:
Pennisetum orientale 1           
Pennisetum orientale 2 
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Magnar on August 01, 2008, 09:46:05 PM
Delphinium forrestii coll Sichuan
Clematis potaninii v fragesii
Lilium pumilum

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 02, 2008, 12:10:44 AM

Magnar,

Love the Clematis.  Yet another species I have never heard of.  ::)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Linda_Foulis on August 02, 2008, 01:58:20 AM
Magnar,
If that delphinium sets seed I would love a couple.  That is just stunning.

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Magnar on August 02, 2008, 07:05:29 AM
Paul: The Clematis is an East Asian species which I grew from seeds some years ago.

Linda: I sure will check the Delphinium for seeds in due time and keep in mind that you want some of them.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 02, 2008, 08:59:12 AM
Magnar,

There's quite a few different species that I've come across here on the forums that I've never seen before.  Being a Clematis lover I can see there are lots more I am going to have to find and make some space for!  ;D  So many things to grow, so little real estate!!  ::)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 02, 2008, 11:57:55 AM
We have a place near our raised bed, where I am trying some huge perennials.
Here is an easy one which reaches 2.50 m at least. It withstands strong winds,
of which we get enough here near the coast and it starts flowering the first
week of July and ( very important!) goes on for three months.

Althaea cannabina 1             
Althaea cannabina 2       
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 02, 2008, 12:06:02 PM
That looks rather interesting Luit.  A very fine and open appearance for such a tall plant.  Lovely flowers too!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 03, 2008, 11:17:01 AM
Can anyone identify this Saxifrage.  The label says it comes from Napa Hai in Yunnan.  Not from Chen Yi
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 03, 2008, 03:18:26 PM
Talking about Miscanthus you mostly will think of huge grasses, up to 2 meters high when in flower.
Here is a small one, reaching only 50 cm in flower.
It took several years to establish here but now it makes even runners,
so I have to look out it is not getting to big.

Miscanthus tinctorius Nanus Variegatus
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johanneshoeller on August 03, 2008, 05:55:49 PM
Arthur, I think this is an unknown Sax. from Gerd Stopp who has collected himself this seed.
The first autumn flowering gentiana in my garden.
A hybrid, pneumonanthe and sino-ornata
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 04, 2008, 12:12:21 AM
I have three sizeable ponds on my property--all connected by streams and a small canal. One pond in particular is HUGE (with it's own small island, just so you can imagine the dimensions).

Many plants and water lilies were put in the large pond in the early years --- and I must admit that my life has become so impossibly hectic that I have barely even walked down to that pond in over 2 years...but today I did a slow stroll around the entire 8 acres, which I have not done in a very long time.

It was lovely to see how large those patches of water lilies had become over the years. Don't ask me any questions about the plants, because I will not be able to answer. This was another lifetime, it seems, when they were let loose in there.

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 04, 2008, 01:05:16 AM
A couple of weeds I like...

Thladiantha dubia (the Manchu tubergourd) just showed up one year---it never gets into trouble here---although I have heard this is not the case in warmer climates--and I find the flowers pretty. It's never produced a fruit in the 15 or so years it's been here, but does seem to reproduce by the "potato tubers". I have kept it confined to the "rear 40" just in case.

The American Pokeweed, Phytolacca americana, is a large shrubby perennial (3m) that gets into bad trouble here, but I still can't resist leaving a couple plants here and there, first of all because I need the seed, and also because of it's amazing presence at the berry stage. Here is one plant in one of my old nursery areas, boring flowers. But soon will be the fantastic black-berry phase.

The variegated form "Silberstein" on the other hand I can barely keep alive here. I don't mind--not particularly fond of most variegates anyway.

If I recall correctly, I was shocked to discover that this plant was allowed entry into Australia.

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 04, 2008, 06:50:00 AM
Super waterlilies Kristl, and I agree with you about the Phytolacca.  Are there two forms?  Ours seems to have crimped berries whereas yours has nice fulsome ones ... or is it the growing conditions I wonder.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Stephen Vella on August 04, 2008, 07:17:25 AM

If I recall correctly, I was shocked to discover that this plant was allowed entry into Australia.



hello Kristal,

Phytolacca americana is still allowed entry into Australia. Eleven species of Phytolacca are allowed entry and four are classified as weeds.

Phytolacca americana is weedy here at the gardens and the berrys make for a tasty treat for birds and so spread the seed around.

Cheers
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 04, 2008, 11:22:31 AM
Sigh, didn't realise there were so many phytolaccas, is this identifiable please?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Diane Clement on August 04, 2008, 11:29:47 AM
Sigh, didn't realise there were so many phytolaccas, is this identifiable please?

Brian, this looks like Phytolacca acinosa
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 04, 2008, 12:50:34 PM
Thanks Diane much appreciated, are there any other markers I should look for to confirm this?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 04, 2008, 02:15:00 PM
Brian,
Yes, the Asian Phytolacca acinosa. Diane beat me to it...which is also hardy for me here. It's altogether a much more elegant plant. The flowering/fruiting spikes tend to grow more strictly upwards rather than the nodding/drooping affair of P. americana.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Diane Clement on August 04, 2008, 02:23:35 PM
I agree with Kristl that A acinosa is a nicer plant than A americana.  It seeds around a bit, but not uncontrollable. 
Brian, have you a picture of the whole plant?  I'll try and post a picture of mine
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 04, 2008, 04:46:55 PM
Quote
The flowering/fruiting spikes tend to grow more strictly upwards rather than the nodding/drooping affair of P. americana.

I think that clinches it Kristl.  Will go and take a photo after I've had me cup of tea.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 04, 2008, 05:14:42 PM
OK here they are
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 04, 2008, 06:02:11 PM
Certainly an excellent plant, Brian.

Paddy
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Tony Willis on August 05, 2008, 10:32:21 AM
I do not find the phytolacca americana will grow here,I think it is to wet in the winter.It is a lovely thing in fruit.

Some things in flower now.

I particularly like this dierama which has bi-coloured flowers.It has been a great year for these plants with all the rain and some are now over 8 feet tall.

The phlox nana do not seem to be seen much now,they had a moment of popularity some years ago and mine came from Allplains seed in the USA this spring as did the P. allysifolia

The colchicum is a species from Mt Falacko in Greece.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: David Nicholson on August 05, 2008, 11:24:54 AM
A couple of pictures here, taken between yet more heavy showers, of my Tigridia pavonia. They flowered well last year and I left them in the garden covered with a heavy mulch to see if they would survive. They did, and regardless of looking a little 'beat up' they have flowered well again. The problem has been waiting for a dry day to photograph them.



Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 05, 2008, 11:51:01 AM
Ah, such summery postings.  So very removed from here at the moment!!  ;D  The Tigridias in particular seem very out of place.  :o  This forum extends the flowering season for everything SO much.  ;)

Tony... that Cyc purpurascens leaf form is lovely.  I love that solid silver christmas tree surrounded by green.  Very nice look to it, setting of (and being set off by) the flowers beautifully.

Never heard of phytolacca before these postings.  The berries certainly look impressive don't they!!  Nice!!  8)

Thanks for the pics everyone.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: gote on August 05, 2008, 05:58:31 PM
You beat me Kristl,
You have larger water lilies than I have.
But I can always claim that the beavers kill mine  :-\
Yes they do - in the lake. They dive and eat the rhizomes.

I was asked to post my ponds so here we go.
The first two pics are from the lakeside. I WILL get a banister to the bridge that goes out to the little island.  :P
I mean I decided that the previous millenium so It must happen sometime.
Butomus umbellatus is quite nice too - also as a cut flower but it must be kept within limits.
Göte
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: gote on August 05, 2008, 06:11:43 PM
The lake is my biggest pond nearly 25 times 40 km. Of course I only own a minute part.
The next largest pond was dug because we need a reservoir for irrigation. It is close to the lake so lakewater infiltrates. 'Filtrates' is the word. the lake is so full of small pieces from the reeds so it will block an irrigating system in seconds.
I grow a few water lilies in the bottom soil but keep a kind of nursery in pots.
The formal pond must be empty in the winter so all plants are in pots. In the winter they go into the big pond at a depth that does not freeze.
The board is to allow frogs and toads to get out again. They like to jump in.

I also keep in a big Jar but I posted that last year I think.
Göte 
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: gote on August 05, 2008, 06:16:03 PM
Dave, or should I say Slug Killer?
Your Deinanthe is great. Is this the species or it is some named clone?
I wish I had your luck with L fargesii. Mine never come up or die.
Göte
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Slug Killer on August 05, 2008, 06:43:20 PM
Hi Gote

It is a species Deinanthe caerulea. Flowers don't last very long unfortunately.

Regards

Dave
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 05, 2008, 06:49:56 PM
Göte, how lovely... and I always thought that Monet's garden was at Giverny in France... and here it is in Sweden!! 8) ;) 8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Joakim B on August 05, 2008, 10:45:00 PM
Göte waiting for something good was not a to long wait :) Great pond an waterlilies  8)
Kristl wow  :o 8) nice I love it.
Kind regards
Joakim
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 06, 2008, 04:22:48 PM
Maggi, nice to see you in the forum. Look at this codonopsis and stay healthy
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 06, 2008, 05:05:51 PM
thank you, Oleg!
We do not grow this Codonopsis... is it easy?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 06, 2008, 06:58:41 PM
It is a nice colour too Oleg, thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 07, 2008, 02:13:40 AM
Cassia marilandica is a wonderful huge North American perennial with a shrub-like presence. Clean foliage and beautiful flowers.

And it's nice when any woody species blooms at this time of the year- Sorbaria kirilowii is so much nicer than the overused S. sorbifolia. Taller, later-blooming, large, pyramidal flower racemes and lovely foliage.

A few of my favorite woodland plants are starting into bloom now; first the pretty Kirengeshoma palmata and of course the very, very, very elegant Anemonopsis macrophylla--on my list of favorite 5 woodland plants.

The wonderful eastern North American Aconitum uncinatum--a very long blooming climber/scrambler.

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 07, 2008, 09:15:47 AM
This the first time I note a flower with two colors pollen. On two different Commelina dianthifolia flowers.
Is it usual?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 07, 2008, 09:40:05 AM
Clematis heracleifolia grown from 2004 Kristl's seeds.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 07, 2008, 02:36:16 PM
Lovely clematis, Bernard. I don't know about the pollen on the Commelina... but when it flowers her I will have a real good look!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 07, 2008, 09:35:17 PM
Maggi, this codonopsis has the same reqirements as C.lanceolata. But unlike C.tubularis I post a ricture of it doesn't unfortunately selfseed for me. I hope to harvest some seed this year. Any interest?
This is C.tubularis which germinates everywhere in the garden
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 07, 2008, 09:39:04 PM
Oleg, I would love seed of either of those Codonopsis, if you get some. I wuill pm you with postal address in hope!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 07, 2008, 09:41:36 PM
Will do my best
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 09, 2008, 11:05:05 AM
Some of my plants that are flowering now:

1 Echinacea purpurea "Harvest Moon"
2 Echinacea purpurea "Twilight"
3 Echinocereus baileyi
4 Lobelia siphilitica
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 09, 2008, 11:08:42 AM
Good that you have these strong colours in your garden at this time of year, Wim. Makes me think that we need to find space for some "summer brights" here, too.... now, how do I persuade Ian that there IS room for perennials???? ??? ::) :-\
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 09, 2008, 12:51:28 PM
Here two pictures of a Silphium which grew in 2 weeks from 1.50 m to
almost 3 meters and still standing strong winds!

Silphium terebinthinaceum 22.07
Silphium terebinthinaceum 08.08
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 09, 2008, 01:08:51 PM
Good that you have these strong colours in your garden at this time of year, Wim. Makes me think that we need to find space for some "summer brights" here, too.... now, how do I persuade Ian that there IS room for perennials???? ??? ::) :-\

Maybe this helps Maggi...?

Perennials
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 09, 2008, 01:11:48 PM
Quote
Maybe this helps Maggi...?
Well, it cannot hurt, Luit  8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 09, 2008, 01:22:19 PM
Luit,

Wow!!!!!  :o

Wim,

Love that colour of the Echinocereus baileyi.  Gloriously intense!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 09, 2008, 02:45:11 PM
Some more perennials then, flowering here now:

Phlox paniculata Junior Bouquet
Phlox paniculata Blue Paradise                 
Phlox paniculata Junior Dream             
Phlox paniculata Junior Fountain           
Phlox paniculata Rijnstroom       
Phlox paniculata Pixie Miracle
Phlox paniculata Starfire               
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 09, 2008, 03:52:31 PM
I have grown this Cimicifuga for many years as C. rubifolia, but I am now questioning that id.
It has been suggested to me that it might be an Asian, not a North American species.

In bloom it follows C. racemosa in my garden, and is just coming into bloom now, with large maple-like foliage, and strictly upright flower racemes.

It produces seed that more closely resembles the C. simplex types (brown, soft, flat seed) rather than the hard, clumping seed of C. racemosa.

Any guesses?






Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 09, 2008, 05:35:15 PM
Here is a Phlox called often Uspech, but according to the only book where it
is described as being 50 cm, cannot be right because it reaches 80 cm.

At the end of the last age several Phlox were imported here in Holland from (?) Lithuania 
and I remember a field with this Phlox. But there were higher ones and lower ones mixed in this field.
The higher ones being useful for cutflowers were kept and the low ones were destroyed.
In this case probably the real Phlox Uspech!

In Germany the higher one is still cultivated as Phlox Uspech and in Holland one
producer claimed with this Phlox a new variety and named it Laura.
I would love to know if there are still somewhere some real low Phlox Uspech
in Eastern Europe.

Phlox paniculata Laura 1             
Phlox paniculata Laura 2
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: ian mcenery on August 09, 2008, 08:08:21 PM
Luit interesting to see phlox growing in lines must make an interesting sight. I have Starfire its colour almost glows in the dark but at the moment most of iy is flat on the ground due to the rain. You can see it in the foreground in the second picture

Here are a few shots from the garden. If you look carefully at the Dierama shoty you can just make out Corydalis Craigton Blue (have I spelt that correctly) still with a few flowers even now. The Eucryphia is now about 20 ft (6M) high and is the best that it has been

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 09, 2008, 08:20:51 PM
Your garden is looking fab, Ian... though with Corydalis 'Craigton Blue' in it, I would say that, wouldn't I? !!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 09, 2008, 11:56:51 PM
Luit,

Beautiful Phlox!!  Love that 'Starfire' one... looks like it would just glow, as Ian says.

Ian,

Great pics of your garden.  Interesting to see L. henryi flowering for you..... I was repotting L. henryi and var citrinum yesterday afternoon, so your timing is right to remind me what they look like.  Thank you!!  8)  That Eucryphia is stunning.  Have seen them on rare occasions here, but never realised that they could be so spectacular.  I guess I've never seen a large one before.  Someone recently was talking about new pink forms of it that they'd seen, and if they looked anything like that pic of your white one I can see why they were commenting.  Beautiful!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kenneth K on August 10, 2008, 09:37:06 AM
The first autumn flowering bulbs are starting. First of them is the tiny Leucojum autumnale.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 10, 2008, 10:24:59 AM
Kenneth,

And over on this side of the world it's spring flowering cousins Acis tingitanum and Acis aestivalis are currently flowering! :D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 10, 2008, 11:09:44 AM
Ian, the only problem here is that Phlox Starfire is susceptible to mildew.
This year they are on a wrong place, hope to find a more windy place next year.
How is this in your place?
Never seen Eucryphia here in a garden. Does it need acid soil?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 10, 2008, 03:12:33 PM
More yellow daisies...this one is Rudbeckia subtomentosa (the sweet black-eyed susan).

Callirhoe involucrata is now in it's 6th (??) week of bloom.

Most of the Eryngium species are already past their prime, but E. amethystinum is just beginning.

The fantastic Silene regia, native of eastern/central USA has opened it's first few flowers and will go on for quite some time. It's a great substitute for the harder to obtain S. virginica, or for those who have trouble growing Lobelia cardinalis. It even tolerates light shade.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 10, 2008, 03:37:24 PM
Here is another "glowing"red Phlox of which I'm not sure what it is.
Probably Phlox Frau Alfred von Mauthner (syn. Spitfire) ??
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: ian mcenery on August 10, 2008, 04:54:23 PM
Luit I have never had problems with Starfire (fingers crossed) with mildew and I grow it in partial shade where its colour shows stronger.

Luit and Paul I think Eucryphias are acid preferring and that they are considered marginally tender, the best ones in the past often in our gardens of the south and west, but I guess that with global warming that's a thing of the past here. I have 3 Eucryphias all well over 20 years old the other 2 being X Rostrevor and the lovely species glutinosa which is one of the parents of Nymans. They are all quite large now and give colour and a sweet fragrance at a time when rhodies and magnolias are finished

Paul there are some pink hybrids but the ones I have seen are to my eyes not as beautiful or as free flowering as Nymans and glutinosa
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 10, 2008, 05:17:04 PM
Quote
The fantastic Silene regia...a great substitute for the harder to obtain S. virginica, or for those who have trouble growing Lobelia cardinalis. It even tolerates light shade.

Now that's interesting Kristl, what sort of soil conditions does it prefer?  I love Eryngium amethystinum not only for the flowers, but for the wonderful foliage.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johanneshoeller on August 10, 2008, 05:39:52 PM
Arthur your unknown Saxifraga (#10) is Saxifraga candelabra!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 10, 2008, 06:16:26 PM
Quote
The fantastic Silene regia...a great substitute for the harder to obtain S. virginica, or for those who have trouble growing Lobelia cardinalis. It even tolerates light shade.

Now that's interesting Kristl, what sort of soil conditions does it prefer?  I love Eryngium amethystinum not only for the flowers, but for the wonderful foliage.

I have found that the Eryngium amethystinum is so often misidentified in the trade, at least in North America---it actually took me many years to get the correct seed for the correct species. Yes. Wonderful foliage.

I grew the Royal Catchfly from wild collected seed (Missouri) and planted the seedlings straight into full sun, well drained, ordinary (alkaline) soil. They have done well (although the constant rain this year is not making them happy). As I knew they occurred naturally in open woods as well as prairies, I also tried a batch at the edge of the woodland garden, where they have also done well, although not quite as floriferous, but over a longer period.

It is actually on the endangered/threatened species list in several states but a snap from seed...
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Diane Clement on August 10, 2008, 06:22:48 PM
Kenneth,

And over on this side of the world it's spring flowering cousins Acis tingitanum and Acis aestivalis are currently flowering! :D

Paul, Leucojum aestivum (along with L vernum) stayed as Leucojum, when all the others moved to Acis.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: ArneM on August 10, 2008, 06:47:56 PM
Aconitum volubile, Dicentra macrocapnos and Tricyrtis 'Tojen' flowering right now in the garden:
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: David Nicholson on August 10, 2008, 07:12:26 PM
Lovely plants Arne and very good pictures. For one so young you show a very high level of skill in both cultivation and choice of plants. I'm sure you will go far in the horticultural world.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: ArneM on August 10, 2008, 07:29:06 PM
Thank you, David. I hope it will come true what you said.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 10, 2008, 07:35:46 PM
That's good news Kristl thanks, I'll have to try it as we can't grow Lobelia cardanalis as we are too dry. ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 10, 2008, 07:41:37 PM
Lovely plants Arne and very good pictures. For one so young you show a very high level of skill in both cultivation and choice of plants. I'm sure you will go far in the horticultural world.

I'll second that, David... it would be terrific for horticulture and the likes of SRGC if more young men like Arne were
developing their gardening interests.... plants are the fututre, eh? !
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 10, 2008, 07:44:43 PM
Arne....now everyone is looking at your profile to see if you posted your age...and now that I too know (16..WOW!!!!!)

I also want to tell you that I have had just one regret in life, and that was that I did not have the courage to stick to horticulture when I was your age (when it was my serious hobby).

In those days, the mid 1960'ies, one could not imagine being able to make a living from loving plants. So, instead I pursued all sorts of other lives and professions, eventually ended up as a lawyer...and it was not until I was almost 42 that I gave that up and started my seed business.

And it is that original regret that causes me to say "so many species...so little time."
Even at your age that is true, but you will get to know at least 25 years worth more plants than I ever will.

 I congratulate you!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Lvandelft on August 10, 2008, 10:42:46 PM
Interestingly some of the same plants (just longer established),
as Arne showed before today.
Arne you will need a lot of space for your Dicentra. (Don't know which name is right)
Seemingly we have the same good taste... ;D 8)

Eupatorium maculatum Riesenschirm       
Dicentra scandens                           
Tricyrtis Tojen             
Thalictrum delavayi Hewitt's Double
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 10, 2008, 11:01:22 PM
Some pictures from the garden toda
Ligularia canaitzensis
Eucomis autumnalis
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 12:40:06 AM
Diane,

Thanks, I didn't know which stayed as Leucojum and which went to Acis.  I have heard it used so often now that I'm just starting to thing of them all as Acis.  Will have to mentally correct that.  Thanks for the info.

Ian,

Someone posted a pic of a lovely pink Eucryphia in one of the garden visit threads I think?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 11, 2008, 12:52:16 AM
My favorite viola, the beautiful, large flowered, sun loving, V. pedata is back--blooming for the second time this year, in fact, better now than in the spring.

And thank you to the bees---look what magic they performed on this Gaillardia. I'll collect the seed, but I am sure when it is sown it will turn into something different again.

Adenophora taquetii.

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Heinie on August 11, 2008, 06:11:50 AM
Here are some of my South African species in flower at the moment

Cyrtanthus mackenii
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_2028.jpg)

(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_2027.jpg)

Cyrtanthus obrienii
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_2000.jpg)

Veltheimia bracteata Lemon Glow
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_1912.jpg)

Veltheimia bracteata Red
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_1914.jpg)

Veltheimia bracteata Pink
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_1913.jpg)

Lachenalia
(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_1894.jpg)

(http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o149/loevenstein/IMG_1682.jpg)

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 11, 2008, 06:23:08 AM
My favorite viola, the beautiful, large flowered, sun loving, V. pedata is back--blooming for the second time this year, in fact, better now than in the spring.

Kristl,
Magnificent! Much better than mines - only one flower now, not worth a photo.
What place in the garden did you select for this tricky species? Poor soil?
In a pocket between stones? Some shelter from rain?

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 06:49:00 AM
Heinie,

Great pics!!  I am currently awaiting the opening of my first yellow Veltheimia, this from seed sown a few years ago.  I also have "bicolor" and "mixed shades" seed coming along, the majority of which are in bud at the moment so I am hoping to see my first ever non-pink Velt!  Great to see yours to remind me of just what I have on the way. 8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Heinie on August 11, 2008, 07:22:52 AM
Tyerman,
I am very interested to see the "bicolor" because I have not seen one yet. Good luck and I am looking forward to your photos.

I hope my photos are sized correctly because I notice that a lot of the posted photos are down sized. I upload with Photobucket.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 09:18:47 AM
Heinie,

If you check at the bottom of each posting there is usually a signature (as you've set up in yours) which often contains people's actual names.  Mine is Paul! :D My ID is my last name.

Your pics are fine, but you don't need to use Photobucket.  If you check at the bottom of the reply, just below the box you type the message into, you'll see "Additional Options", which allows you to upload the pictures to the SRGC site itself.  That way there is never any problem with anyone having a server down on photobucket or wherever else you store them, and you don't need to have your own storage area for them.

As to the bicolour velt... I have seen pics where the flower is half yellow and half pink (i.e top half of each flower is one colour and the bottom half the other).  I too have never actually seen one of them, so I am awaiting finding out whether any of the seedlings show this or not.  I am just wanting something not the normal musky pink to be honest, i.e something different!!  ;D  Yes, I'll post pics in the Southern Hemisphere thread when they open.  It will still be a while yet as only a few of them are even showing any colour in the buds as yet, but I can still tell that it looks like all the yellow seedlings should BE yellow, at least they have none of the darker shading appearing on the stem and buds of the other pots of seedlings.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Slug Killer on August 11, 2008, 09:31:48 AM
Thanks for the info about putting pictures on. I've always used photobucket as I did not realise there was a direct method :P Will make it a lot quicker in future.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 09:43:28 AM
You can also upload more than one pic (up to 10) by clicking on 'More Attachments' to the right of the browse box, so it really does make it so simple and easy.  It's all been mentioned from time to time, but unless you happen to read the right topics and see the comments it isn't something you'd notice on your own... at least I certainly didn't when I started.  Didn't occur to me that the 'Additional Options' thing meant much at all.  ::)  Now, it is just so easy to post pics.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: arillady on August 11, 2008, 09:48:47 AM
I received seed of Cyrtanthus mackenii years ago from a friend and when they flowered there was a cream, an orange and lovely salmon pink. I gave someone bulbs of the pink and now I don't have it at all - I must have given all the pink away! I have the small clump in the garden and it flowers for ages - has been in flower for a couple of months now.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 09:56:50 AM
Pat,

You need to work out who you gave the bulbs to and see if you can get a bit of the pink back!  ;)  I've done the same thing in the past, but invariably when that happens you can't remember who it was who you gave them too.  ::)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Heinie on August 11, 2008, 11:24:12 AM
Paul,
Thank you for the info about your name but I noticed it after I posted.

Thanks also for the info on posting photos directly. I made use of the same method from some other Forums.

Pat,
Yes, the C mackenii seems to flower all year round here. I only have the red form of C mackenii but a few more species that may flower soon.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 11, 2008, 11:37:32 AM
Oh, my, I do like that purple/blue spotted Lachenalia.... I haven't seen that colour before.... how lovely..... Heinie, we are really going to enjoy seeing these plants of yours!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: ArneM on August 11, 2008, 12:58:12 PM
Maggi, I think you're right. Plants are the future. :D

Kristl, first thanks for your compliment. I don't have to hide my hobby but there's no one in my region at my age who is really interested in plants. They accept it but not more... Therefore it's quite complicated to find friends who want to go with me in a Botanic Garden if our class is spending a trip to London for example. Fortunately I found some.
I am very interested in plants that's right but I think they will be my hobby only as there are only a few well-paid jobs in that sector. So I prefer to study medicines to get a job in the stem cell or cancer research later. But it is still enough time to change my opinion...  ;D

Luit, I am not sure whether my Dicentra really is D. macrocapnos but both species exist. You're interested in many plants I am also interested in, so it has to be a good taste.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 11, 2008, 01:17:30 PM
Luit and Arne,

They are two distinct species, but I don't know how to tell them apart for sure.  In my garden, Dicentra macrocapnos shoots very early and flowers very late in comparison to Dicentra scandens in a friend's garden, but that could just be differences in our gardens.  Hers is much denser when in flower, but comparatively flowers for a shorter period, again I have no idea whether this is representative or just differences in our gardens?  Whichever name they are, they're lovely.  I grow my D. macrocapnos on an arch with Tropaeolum tricolor, as one grows and flowers in summer and the other in winter.  Works very nicely I think.  8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 11, 2008, 01:27:57 PM
My favorite viola, the beautiful, large flowered, sun loving, V. pedata is back--blooming for the second time this year, in fact, better now than in the spring.

Kristl,
Magnificent! Much better than mines - only one flower now, not worth a photo.
What place in the garden did you select for this tricky species? Poor soil?
In a pocket between stones? Some shelter from rain?


Yes, Gerd, I have seen it in the wild, so it's in poor soil and full sun...in fact, in very little soil at all...the largest patch is on top of one of the big pieces of limestone in my rock garden, where nothing else will grow (just a few cm of soil on the top of the rock.) The second little drift is wedged in a wide crevice.

The location is about 90cm? high and exposed-- no shelter from rain or anything else---and there is barely a day it has not rained since winter. Some of the foliage is looked very chlorotic right now (yellow), and it does have me worried, especially since they are blooming almost too well.

I only got one single seed pod this spring from many plants (and good bloom). Perhaps I will get more now...?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 11, 2008, 01:40:38 PM
Arthur your unknown Saxifraga (#10) is Saxifraga candelabra!

Hans

Thank you for the identification.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 11, 2008, 02:54:43 PM
Pictures taken yesterday morning.
The Echinacea was found two weeks ago in a garden center named as Echinacea Magnus :)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 11, 2008, 05:47:04 PM
Great plants, Bernard.....  and that Iris is the biggest I have seen! Extraordinary!  8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: derekb on August 11, 2008, 06:50:47 PM
Just one from me today,
Eucomis montana
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 11, 2008, 09:26:57 PM
Aren't Eucomis flowers lovely? I am sad to think of all those folks who never bend down to study their plants closely, or who cannot enjoy the wonderful digital photos that we can see here to appreciate the intricacy of the flowers.  :(
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 11, 2008, 09:48:33 PM
Quote
Yes, Gerd, I have seen it in the wild, so it's in poor soil and full sun...in fact, in very little soil at all...the largest patch is on top of one of the big pieces of limestone in my rock garden, where nothing else will grow (just a few cm of soil on the top of the rock.) The second little drift is wedged in a wide crevice.

The location is about 90cm? high and exposed-- no shelter from rain or anything else---and there is barely a day it has not rained since winter. Some of the foliage is looked very chlorotic right now (yellow), and it does have me worried, especially since they are blooming almost too well.

I only got one single seed pod this spring from many plants (and good bloom). Perhaps I will get more now...?

Thank you Kristl,
It seems I have to improve the drainage for better results. Are you sure that Viola pedata tolerates lime? Did it grow naturally in limestone areas?
It is stated often that it needs limefree soil and additional Fe fertilizer was recommended.

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 11, 2008, 09:56:45 PM
Maggi, this Iris has a 12 cm radius.
Two natives.

Aster umbellatus plant
 Aster umbellatus ombelle
 Spiraea latifolia macro
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 11, 2008, 10:21:15 PM
Interesting Spiraea latifolia, too..... and the Aster.... lots of good plants.... keep them coming, Bernard!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 12, 2008, 01:08:29 AM
 Are you sure that Viola pedata tolerates lime? Did it grow naturally in limestone areas?
It is stated often that it needs limefree soil and additional Fe fertilizer was recommended.

Gerd,
I believe a somewhat acid pH is preferred---but not necessary. It is fairly widespread--native to 33 of the states in the USA--and in some states it is present everywhere in the state----so cannot be too picky about it's soil PH.

I think the well-drained environment is more important than any other factor.

Where I saw it was in the eastern USA, on the dry banks along the roads, growing in gravel, which I would guess was limestone. Also, I know anything that is common on prairies (which this species is) would be more than tolerant of lime.

I planted it in the rock garden because I didn't have anywhere else suitable where it wouldn't get eaten up by the big guys. So, I did not even think about the soil PH when I planted the seedlings.

Gerd, take a look at the Viola pedata faces on this page, if you have not seen it before.

http://www.plantbuzz.com/RockGard/pedata/pedata_faces.htm


Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 12, 2008, 01:14:14 AM
OK, Maggi, others natives.
Pictures of sterile and fertile flower for Epilobidiun angustifolium.
Eriophotum is very good for dried flower. I actually have three dried stems 10 years old, and they look like the first day.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 12, 2008, 06:00:51 AM
.
Gerd, take a look at the Viola pedata faces on this page, if you have not seen it before.
[url]http://www.plantbuzz.com/RockGard/pedata/pedata_faces.htm[/url]


Very informative, thank you Kristl.

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: annew on August 12, 2008, 10:55:21 AM
Is the Spiraea herbaceous or shrubby, Bernard?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 12, 2008, 11:12:39 AM
Anne, this Spiraea is shrubby and comes in different colors, from white to pink.
Now, a beautyfull annual weed.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 12, 2008, 11:14:21 AM
Bernard,

Beautiful impatiens, and I too love that Spiraea.  Looks like the flowers on the latter are quite large?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 12, 2008, 12:26:28 PM
Paul, the max. flower length is 2,5 cm.
Now, a native shrub. Flowers should be very little, I did not saw anyone.
Nemopanthus mucronatus
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Tony Willis on August 12, 2008, 02:11:14 PM
this is Pelargonium endlicherianum from seed collected on Ala Dag in Turkey (not by me I have not seen it in the wild)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: derekb on August 12, 2008, 06:46:53 PM
Aren't Eucomis flowers lovely? I am sad to think of all those folks who never bend down to study their plants closely, or who cannot enjoy the wonderful digital photos that we can see here to appreciate the intricacy of the flowers.  :(
           Maggi, When you get to my age it is easy getting down to flowers but its a B------ getting up
Derek
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 12, 2008, 07:09:17 PM
I know, Derek... all the more reason for building as many raised beds as possible when one is young enough to manage that ! Either that or keep a huge dog who will stand quietly by as you haul yourself to you feet while holding on to him....that can work quite well. Pity about our Lily dog being so small......she just comes up and nibbles your nose as you struggle! :-[
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 13, 2008, 12:37:21 PM
Thladiantha dubia "eva".
In a neglected corner. On the other side of the trellis, a compost pile.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 13, 2008, 01:31:41 PM
Bernard, are you not afraid that the Thladiantha will take over all of Québec ?
With such a plant I would be worried for the future of "le Québec libre"  !! ;)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Blue-bellied Frog on August 13, 2008, 02:29:52 PM
Maggi, I'm not effraid to be enslaved by flowers. It is already done :)
My new slogan is "Vive le Québec libre, excepté pour les fleurs."
Now Anemone tomentosa "Robustissima" in an other neglected corner.
Plus 2 Hemerocallis.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Katherine J on August 13, 2008, 03:57:51 PM
These "neglected corners" are really good! ;D Beautiful Anemone.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 14, 2008, 12:43:11 PM
I am pleased to find that at long last - about four years I think since I bought the bulb, Eucomis Schiffii has flowered.  The flower head is not as big as many others, but the flowers resemble E.bicolour, as you can see there is attractive spotting on the underside of the leaves, the topknot has an attractive picotee edge and the stem is very dark. 8)

NB Although sold as such this is not E.Schijffii, apologies for any confusion.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 14, 2008, 01:03:34 PM
Oh, yes, Brian, that WAS worth waiting for!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 14, 2008, 01:29:06 PM
 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 14, 2008, 01:31:54 PM
Brian,

Really beautiful pics.  Can almost reach out and touch the plant.  Great stuff!!  8)

So what actually IS the difference between it and E. bicolor?  I have the tiniest little bulb of schiffii I bought many years ago that just refuses to grow for me.  It puts up a tiny leaf every year, never getting more than an inch long.  Obviously it needs something specific that I don't know about.  I didn't realise it was so close to bicolor though, and bicolor grows just fine for me here. ???
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 14, 2008, 02:14:17 PM
Paul, we had a bulb of Eucomis bicolor that barely persisted in the garden for over ten years.... finally, one year it took a  growth spurt and flowered.... now it flowers each year and even has now, umpteen years later again, got a baby bulb !   Patience, lad, patience!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 14, 2008, 02:58:18 PM
Paul the differences seem subtle ;)
The stem of E.bicolour is heavily speckled rather than virtually deep purple.  The flower head on E.bicolour is much deeper and fulsome, the topknot seems to hang down over the top of the flowers in E.Schiffii whereas it seems much more perched on top in E.bicolour.  Also, having rushed outside instead of enjoying my cup of tea ;D you can see that E.bicolour is somewhat earlier...as far as I can tell, haven't looked it up yet.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 14, 2008, 03:03:53 PM
Paul don't give up on the E.schiffii (not that I thought that you would), in the earlier years I just got a small rosette of weak looking leaves, last year they were a little stronger looking, and this year quite broad as they grew.  I imagine it's just a case of the bulb getting up to flowering size.  I let them die down in the Autumn and then stick them in an unheated greenhouse over the winter (anywhere would do I am sure).  Started off again in March time when I repot them and grow on outside watering quite well.  Obviously there is a subtle difference in the yearly temperature between East Anglia UK and Australia :o
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: David Nicholson on August 14, 2008, 08:39:54 PM
Nice Brian, I shall have to give them a try.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 14, 2008, 10:01:13 PM
They should grow well for you David, and are a lot hardier than most people think.  The bicolours seed themselves round the garden - with a bit of help from the birds no doubt ;)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 15, 2008, 11:09:21 AM
Brian,

I wasn't going to give up on it.... it is just that my plant that I have now had for maybe 4 or 5 years doesn't have a rosette.... it has one, count it, ONE leaf each year of about an inch long.  That's it, never bigger.  I'm going to repot it soon if I think of it when I'm repotting, and put it into a sandier mix with some extra food and see what it does.  It'll either make it or kill it I think, but at the rate it is going now I'll be dead before it does anything, and I'm only 39.  :o
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 15, 2008, 11:29:44 AM
Brian,

I've been trying to satisfy a hunch by checking the internet, but the results have been inconclusive.  My recollection of what E. schjiffii (I originally received it under this name, with the j in it) was supposed to look like was pinky flowers and darker foliage.  I was very surprised to see your plant looking so much like bicolor.  Unfortunately on google I can find pics that look similar to yours and some that show the pink flowers and purplish leaves, so I am no closer to working out what schiffii (also on google both spellings appeared, i.e schiffii and shjiffii) is actually supposed to look like.  I have had it in mind for years as having dark leaves (while googling I found a discussion I took part in back in 2001, which was sort of amusing and a little creepy... seeing a discussion from 7 years ago), and definitely having pink flowers.... one of the pics I found matched that while others look more like yours.  Is there any Eucomis expert out there who can confirm whether schiffii/schjiffii is that variable?  That's pretty widely differing, so I am wondering whether some are going around out there under incorrect names?  I got my little bulb years ago as something unusual, and the person I got it from I would doubt would have told me that if it looked that close to bicolor, so I am more than a little confused?  Can anyone clarify what it should definitely look like and how it is correctly spelled?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 15, 2008, 11:50:01 AM
Paul, I too had thought it would have darker leaves.  I think it's a bit like snowdrops etc (had to get that one in for Maggi ;D ) in that they really probably need to be vegatively propagated.  There are, as you say, some much nicer ones around and some disappointing ones too.  I was expecting the scape to be much shorter, but we have had heavy rain recently which may account for it's elongation.  I will look for seeds and start some more off, watch this space in another 7 years!
Just found this Eucomis schijffii from
B and T World Seeds' reference number: 432808
USDA average, annual, minimum temperature Zone:10
Type of plant - Perennial
Flower: dark dull RED or PURPLE
Foliage: 3-4 prostrate lvs,PURPLISH under
Height, in meters: 0.1 X

Not available at the moment but much more like your thoughts.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 16, 2008, 10:29:56 PM
Paul, I've just been told that there is only one person in England growing the true Schijffii and that is Cecilia Coller.  Apparently she only gets about three seeds a year and there is a waiting list for them.  The one I had been sold is not the real thing :'(
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 17, 2008, 12:06:21 AM
Brian,

Sorry to have been the one to start you finding out it wasn't correctly named.  I do apologise.  :'(

Did you get a proper description of the species?  So that we know what the actual true species is supposed to look like?  Maybe I can take the description out to my tiny plant and tell it to get it's act together.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 17, 2008, 08:31:05 AM
No need for apologies Paul, I am pleased to have found out, I think it will have to be a Eucomis not schijffii!  And now the search starts for the real thing.  I have put it on the wants list at B & T World seeds, and will try writing to Cecilia, unless I see her at the Bulb Sale.  This was the nearest I could find

http://www.aluka.org/action/showCompilationPage?doi=10.5555/AL.AP.COMPILATION.PLANT-NAME-SPECIES.EUCOMIS.SCHIJFFII&tab=species.info

Unfortunately cannot get full access to the site :-\
Richard did say last evening that it was only 10cms high so a 'dear little thing'.  I suspect you may well have the real thing...can I ask where your source was?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 17, 2008, 08:45:04 AM
Look what I found Paul :o

http://www.srgc.org.uk/discus/messages/283/41752.html
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 17, 2008, 04:09:43 PM
Oh, yes, there is often a clue, eh? Some very useful stuff on the archived forum, isn't there?

Might be a good idea for newcomers to bookmark this link for future use....... ::)

http://www.srgc.org.uk/cgi-bin/discus/discus.cgi
Following the first link you give, Brian, I see that the type specimen cited there was collected by Burtt and Hilliard, of Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, so presumably the herbarium there has material/details, also?


Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 17, 2008, 04:25:33 PM
There is indeed Maggi, I am kicking myself for not having tapped this knowledgebase before.

Still I am happy with my dark stemmed E.bicolour x ? but I would have been will be happier with E.Schijffi (when I find it) :-\
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 17, 2008, 04:33:08 PM
I agree, Brian, your plant is very nice.... it would just be even nicer to lay hands on the real thing, which indeed is  a real little cutie.... wouldn't you know those guys in Gothenberg would be growing it?? What an amazing place that is! one day I WILL visit!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 17, 2008, 04:49:30 PM
I started this thread with pictures of my Hibiscus.  The following are the same plants one week on - too busy to post earlier.  Subsequent rain has meant that the display is now nearly over.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 17, 2008, 05:00:38 PM
[attach=1]
Ooh, Arthur, what a show they are...... such a shame about the rain....in a really good year for the hibiscus, how long would you expect the display to last?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 17, 2008, 05:13:51 PM

Ooh, Arthur, what a show they are...... such a shame about the rain....in a really good year for the hibiscus, how long would you expect the display to last?

Difficult to remember, but I believe they have generally opened more slowly and the whole display has lasted weeks.

I will probably remove approx 40% of structure next Spring and then be amazed to see them recover to this size again.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 17, 2008, 05:38:29 PM
I thought that might be the case, Arthur.... the family Malvaceae are quite obliging in that habit aren't they....also in their capacity to be cut well back and regrow ...very handy.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 17, 2008, 11:23:07 PM
Some colour from the garden today:

Codonopsis lanceolata competing with Aristolochia clematitis.

Astilbe chinensis pumila is very common, but a good doer.

The biennial Corydalis ochotensis raddeana may be too weedy for small gardens, but I love it romping around here in the late season with it's pretty salmony flowers for almost 6 weeks.

Saxifraga manschuriensis is lovely in moist shade.

This is a Vernonia from the Ozarks (V. baldwinii) blooming significantly earlier than many of the others in the genus, and not quite as tall.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 18, 2008, 01:31:02 AM
Kristl,

That Codonopsis looks fascinating.

Brian,

The source is no longer in business unfortunately.  I would trust his stuff, but I wish I could do this Eucomis justice.  It is still a bulb about 1cm thick, just like it has been the last couple of years.  ::)  I'm going to put it into a sandier mix this season and see if the extra drainage might help it establish better roots or something.  Trying to work out whether I should shift it into less sun, in case that has been the problem.  Never had to think about that with Eucomis before as they seem to love full sun.  I'm going to put it into a shadehouse for the time being to give it a bit of extra warmth and perhaps start it growing a little earlier.  Maybe a bit of coddling will help it along this year.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johnw on August 18, 2008, 02:40:29 AM
We've had the first full day of sun in a month and it's feeling very summery here - +21c at 10:30pm. Here's a bizarre one in bloom today and looking quite good despite the wetness.  It's Stephania cepharantha  - a big caudex that remains dormant until July and then sends up rampant vines with lovely leaves. I had never noticed the flowers before, there's just something about green flowers.

johnw
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: annew on August 18, 2008, 08:11:05 AM
That is a stunning Codonopsis - is it a climber or free-standing?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 18, 2008, 09:03:17 AM
Quote
The source is no longer in business unfortunately.
  :'( :'(

Quote
I'm going to put it into a shadehouse for the time being to give it a bit of extra warmth and perhaps start it growing a little earlier.  Maybe a bit of coddling will help it along this year.

I hope you are successful Paul.  I find their foliage to be more rigid in semi-shade, so it may be happier ... and I am sure it is a lot sunnier with you!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 18, 2008, 09:04:24 AM
Kristl, The Codonopsis is lovely, does it have good markings in the bell?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 18, 2008, 02:09:39 PM
That is a stunning Codonopsis - is it a climber or free-standing?

It's a very delicate climber, too well-behaved for my taste (considering some of the other members of its family) and utterly elegant. I love the totally non-descript exterior, with that strong hint at the margins of what is inside. This is an out-of-focus picture of the interior: I'll try to get a better one today.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 18, 2008, 03:07:19 PM
What a super Codonopsis, the interior is not bad either, such a shame some of these flowers have to be lifted up to appreciate their full beauty.  I can't pass C.clematidea without lifting them up :)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 18, 2008, 04:06:40 PM
Codonopsis are great for peeking in, I agree!  They are one of the best flowers for having all that detail coyly hidden away......only drawback to them is the "foxy" smell .....such a let down on such dainty plants.  We always know when a codonopsis has seeded somewhere new... it only takes the merest bruise as you pass to release the telltale pong!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johanneshoeller on August 18, 2008, 06:20:34 PM
Gentiana szechenyi and georgii alba
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: David Nicholson on August 18, 2008, 06:54:54 PM
Hans, two little beauties.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Anthony Darby on August 18, 2008, 10:43:19 PM
Some colour from the garden today:

Codonopsis lanceolata competing with Aristolochia clematitis.

Astilbe chinensis pumila is very common, but a good doer.

The biennial Corydalis ochotensis raddeana may be too weedy for small gardens, but I love it romping around here in the late season with it's pretty salmony flowers for almost 6 weeks.

Saxifraga manschuriensis is lovely in moist shade.

This is a Vernonia from the Ozarks (V. baldwinii) blooming significantly earlier than many of the others in the genus, and not quite as tall.

Not seen Aristolochia clematitis flowers like those Kristl. Mine are clear yellow with no fancy twisty thing, as were the ones that grew as weeds in the olive groves and vineyards of Croatia.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 19, 2008, 01:40:19 AM
Dave,

And a very nice unknown Bletilla too!!  :D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kenneth K on August 19, 2008, 12:04:58 PM
Autumn is slowly arriving in the garden. Some pictures from the last week.
1. Gladiolus flanagannii
2. Aconitum arcuatum
3. Astilbe simplicifolia
4. Astilbe 'Sprite'
5. Colchicum neapolitanum
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Katherine J on August 19, 2008, 01:56:20 PM
Very nice Astilbes Kenneth!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on August 19, 2008, 02:22:36 PM
Very nice Kenneth !!  8)

How tall is the Gladiolus ??  Do you grow it outside ??
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 19, 2008, 06:24:35 PM
Autumn comes nearer - some pics from today

1. Sternbergia sicula, a selection called 'Dodona Gold'
2. Colchicum from Morocco (longifolium?) - not sure about the determination
3. Cyclamen colchicum
4. Salvia uliginosa - nice flowers but height 1.80 m !

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Hans A. on August 19, 2008, 10:03:10 PM
Gerd, :o I cannot believe Sternbergias started to flower -  isn't it still summer ::) - here everything is dry and I hope not to see any Sternbergia earlier than end of september...
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 19, 2008, 10:47:08 PM
Kenneth,

The gladiolus (have loved this plants for years) and the aconitum are both beautiful plants. Great posting.

Gerd,

That salvia is a dote.

Hans,

You describe your conditions as 'dry', something which amazes me as we are literally under water here. I had the impression that there was not a dry spot left on the surface of the world.

Paddy

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 20, 2008, 12:01:50 AM
Paddy,

That is a WAY wrong impression.  Northern Hemisphere you might stretch it to, but not the World.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 20, 2008, 08:35:21 AM
Hans,
In fact a few days later than in 2007 (it was 11.08.07). It seems the developement of flowers of some Sternbergia species are not affected by wetter conditions.

Paul,
Thank you!

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 20, 2008, 09:35:01 AM
So, Paul,

a swap of weather might benefit us both.

Paddy
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 20, 2008, 11:32:12 AM
Paddy,

If could swap a week or two of our sun for a week or two of your rain I would jump at the chance!!!!!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 20, 2008, 12:52:41 PM
And so would we, Paul.

We have had an absolutely dreadful run of miserable weather here, particularly so since last weekend; garden flooded, dykes broken and washed away and I can't even get in to repair them because of the amount of water running. No grass cutting though as the ground is too soft for machinery. The only place getting my attention is the veg patch where I have good footpaths of gravel and so it is possible to work on a dry surface.

It is really dreary here and I would love some sun.

Paddy
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Anthony Darby on August 20, 2008, 11:23:41 PM
Whilst I was away my mum took pics of my Gladiolus flanagannii. This is its third season and I always miss it,no matter how late we set off on holiday!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on August 21, 2008, 09:19:03 AM
Whilst I was away my mum took pics of my Gladiolus flanagannii. This is its third season and I always miss it,no matter how late we set off on holiday!

Is this as short as it looks Anthony ??  20 cm or so ???
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Anthony Darby on August 21, 2008, 10:14:14 AM
Yes. Isn't this normal?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 21, 2008, 10:59:07 AM
Anthony mine was overwintered in a cool glasshouse and the stem length was roughly 30cm, but I should imagine starting it off in the glasshouse would make that difference?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: shelagh on August 21, 2008, 02:42:26 PM
Just a couple of plants that are struggling to look good in this dreadful weather.  Adiantum hispidulum with its beautiful new pink foliage,  Eucryphia ? we bought this from Ness Botanic some years ago and it had no label it's more of a bush than a tree.  An Anchusa given us by Johnnie D recently and finally Scilla numidica. When I googled this this morning I found one of my own entries on the forum asking a question about it.  Anyway it has finally flowered. Stands about 6 inches tall, flower 1/2 to 3/4 inch, lovely red foliage when it first comes through.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Diane Clement on August 21, 2008, 02:51:52 PM

Scilla numidica. When I googled this this morning I found one of my own entries on the forum asking a question about it.  Anyway it has finally flowered. Stands about 6 inches tall, flower 1/2 to 3/4 inch, lovely red foliage when it first comes through.


Nice plants, Shelagh. 
Try looking here first for Scilla numidica
http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/namedetail.do?accepted_id=300284&repSynonym_id=-9998&name_id=288823&status=false
and you will find that its name was changed to Barnardia numidica and a reference on the PBS
http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/Barnardia

Diane
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 21, 2008, 08:10:55 PM
Paul, you may be interested in the reply I have just had from the National Collection Holder of Eucomis (why I didn't think of contacting him to start with I don't know).


The two species grow side by side on the Drakensberg Mountains so it's not unusual for dormant bulbs to be collected from the wrong species (it has happened to me also). I find seed of E.schijffii, as well as being scarce, very difficult to germinate and grow on. Leaf cuttings can be a more reliable source.

This explains where the mix-up occured. ::) There is an article in this months (September!) RHS The Garden magazine by Alan Street on Eucomis.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 21, 2008, 08:16:55 PM
Here are

1. Impatiens arguta - a perennial and hardy species - recently introduced from China
    and for comparison
2. Impatiens namcharbawensis - much more blue but unfortunately an annual
3. Fruits of Rubus nepalensis - a surprise for me because I found them the first time

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Staale on August 21, 2008, 08:22:14 PM
Kenneth;
That was a really nice Aconitum. I have never seen Aconitum arcuatum. Is it a twining species?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 21, 2008, 08:24:19 PM
Gerd, I had no idea you were such an "impatient" fellow  ;) :D ;) Do you grow many of these lovley plants?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 21, 2008, 10:00:47 PM
Gerd, I had no idea you were such an "impatient" fellow  ;) :D ;) Do you grow many of these lovley plants?

Yes, Maggi - unfortunately I am very impatient (in the sense of 'ungeduldig') and I tried hard to change myself (with limited success)  ;D ;D ;D.

But seriously, I grow only the two species of Impatiens I showed but love them very much.
Recently Impatiens tinctoria was mentioned in the Forum of the pbs. I added this species to my want list!

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 21, 2008, 10:57:48 PM
They are interesting plants, Gerd, and not ones I have seen being grown.... can you tell me how tall they grow, please?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paul T on August 21, 2008, 11:54:38 PM
Brian,

I contacted Cameron McMaster regarding the Eucomis Shijffii and he has confirmed it is the dark type, not looking like bicolor.  There is also what looks like an paler form without any of the purple in teh flowers or the leaves, but it is looking like being given its own species name.  So at least we know now what it would be looking like if we DO get it.  :D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: fermi de Sousa on August 22, 2008, 12:45:38 AM
Nice plants, Shelagh. 
Try looking here first for Scilla numidica
[url]http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/namedetail.do?accepted_id=300284&repSynonym_id=-9998&name_id=288823&status=false[/url]
and you will find that its name was changed to Barnardia numidica and a reference on the PBS
[url]http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/Barnardia[/url]

Diane

Another case of our government bureaucracy being behind the times! Scilla numidica is on ICON (the list of seed allowed to be imported into Australia) but Barnardia isn't! If someone were to send Barnardia numidica seed to us it would be confiscated and it would require the sender to verify the name as being a synonym of the "allowed" Scilla numidica! Just my sending them a reference to the fact wouldn't be enough! At least that's what happened this year with regard to some seed sent from Overseas! it would be great to be part of the EU! (except for the weather).
And Shelagh, it's a little stunner that scilla barnardia of yours!
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 22, 2008, 06:55:32 AM
They are interesting plants, Gerd, and not ones I have seen being grown.... can you tell me how tall they grow, please?

Impatiens arguta + I. namcharbawensis = about 60 cm
Impatiens tinctoria =  up to 2,2 m  and scented!

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kenneth K on August 22, 2008, 09:29:46 AM
My G flanagannii is about 3 dm and it is overwintering in a welldrained bulb bed. I believe it can grow a little higher. In Gothenburg botanic garden they have an old plant which is at least 4 dm high.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on August 22, 2008, 09:34:11 AM
Thanks Kenneth, it looks very nice - It is now going on my wants list !  ;)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kenneth K on August 22, 2008, 09:42:37 AM
Aconitum arcuatum is a species from South Korea. It was collected in the 80s by personnel from Gothenburg botanical garden. It is not actually twining. The stems are not so strong and are growing in bows. In swedish it is called "Bågstormhatt" = "Bow aconitum". It needs some support and I should call it "half twining"
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Kenneth K on August 22, 2008, 09:51:31 AM
A little more about G flanagannii. It is from South Africa. I have read that it goes by the name of suicide gladiolus because it grows in crevices in vertical basalt cliffs. To get to it you are risking your life! Fortunately it grows quite well in the garden.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Anthony Darby on August 22, 2008, 11:13:58 AM
A little more about G flanagannii. It is from South Africa. I have read that it goes by the name of suicide gladiolus because it grows in crevices in vertical basalt cliffs. To get to it you are risking your life! Fortunately it grows quite well in the garden.

Mine is in a small trough, as you can see, and stays out all year. I notice it has well developed seed pods and there are some small offsets so I may try some in the alpine house?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: shelagh on August 22, 2008, 02:48:00 PM
A Barnardia is it!  Diane's links tell me it is primitve, a bulb geophyte and a member of Asparagaceae.  All I really need to know is does it still come under bulb classes in the SRGC and AGS?  I think I shall probably only need another 10 years before I can get a full 3 inch pot ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Diane Clement on August 22, 2008, 05:57:30 PM
All I really need to know is does it still come under bulb classes in the SRGC and AGS? 

Yep, but are you volunteering to run a show in August?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 22, 2008, 10:44:09 PM
Came back from holiday to find these in bloom
Codonopsis grey wilsonii Himal Snow
Codonopsis lanceolata (and inside)
Merendera montana
Carlina acaulis
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on August 22, 2008, 11:00:49 PM
and some more
Astilbe japonic
Galtonia regalis (right) & candicans
Galtonia viridiflora
Aconitum coufertiflorum
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 22, 2008, 11:17:06 PM
Oleg,

That was a nice welcome home for you, excellent plants and photographs.

Your seasons and flowering times amaze me. Codonopsis and carlina are in flower here but galtonia flowered months ago. I would never see them all in flower at the same time.

Paddy
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 23, 2008, 08:33:07 AM
Great pictures Oleg, I love those Codonopsis.

Paddy my Galtonia is just floweringtoo, you must have an Irish variety!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: derekb on August 23, 2008, 05:53:56 PM
In the 25 years that I have had this Lapageria this is the first time it has ever flowered in August.

Derek.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Brian Ellis on August 23, 2008, 06:06:00 PM
Yes Derek, my younger plant is flowering too.  Global warming!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 24, 2008, 11:41:18 AM
Here are some of the plants that are flowering in my garden now:

1) Allium senescens ssp. montanum
2) Amaryllis belladonna
3) Colchicum autumnale (just showing itself)
4) Collomia debilis var. larsenii
5) Cyclamen ??
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Slug Killer on August 24, 2008, 04:12:47 PM
Lilium fargesii in flower now, eight flowers in total.

(http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk81/SlugKiller/liliumfargesii2800.jpg)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: David Nicholson on August 24, 2008, 07:45:49 PM
Cracking picture Dave, can't understand why you need a new lens! ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Slug Killer on August 24, 2008, 08:12:57 PM
Cheers ;D ;D ;D

Not sharp enough is the simple answer and I can't get the smaller flowers full frame as I can't get close enough with the current lens.

Dave
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Thomas Huber on August 25, 2008, 07:16:48 AM
Here are some of the plants that are flowering in my garden now:
5) Cyclamen ??

Wim, your unknown Cyclamen looks very much like C. hederifolium!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 25, 2008, 07:23:20 AM
Hello Thomas,

it certainly could be. I'm no expert in Cyclamens... I probably bought it when it was in flower and I just liked it  ;)

Thanks for the determination

Wim
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johnw on August 25, 2008, 04:14:46 PM
Oleg - Are the Galtonias growing outdoors and overwintering there?

johnw
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Slug Killer on August 25, 2008, 07:11:50 PM
Well I now have another Autumn flowering Pleione opening today! Pleione saxicola

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 26, 2008, 10:50:01 AM
A little more about G flanagannii. It is from South Africa. I have read that it goes by the name of suicide gladiolus because it grows in crevices in vertical basalt cliffs. To get to it you are risking your life! Fortunately it grows quite well in the garden.

Mine is in a small trough, as you can see, and stays out all year. I notice it has well developed seed pods and there are some small offsets so I may try some in the alpine house?
Anthony
Having acquired a large pot of this Gladiolus at the Mid-Anglia Bulb Sale, I am wondering when is the best time to repot/split up the congested growth.  Can you point me in the right direction, as there are a lot of people who are waiting for some corms.
Thanks
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Anthony Darby on August 26, 2008, 11:16:31 AM
Arthur, I usually wait until the leaves have completely died down. If they are still green the corms will be still growing. I am not touching mine until the seed pods have ripened and split. I'm sure there are more knowledgeable people out there who could help?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 26, 2008, 11:57:39 AM
Anthony

Thanks - that is what I thought, but always best to ask.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Miriam on August 29, 2008, 10:27:10 PM
Hi,

Here are some pictures from my garden.
Enjoy!

Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Tony Willis on August 29, 2008, 11:31:15 PM
That aristolochia is just great.I have only seen them in tropical houses and I think they are fascinating. i grow a couple of hardy ones
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 30, 2008, 09:36:32 AM
Not sure where I should post this, but as it was found amongst my pentstemons, thought I would post it here and ask for identification.

Largest caterpillar I have ever seen - approx 6cm long by 1.5cm wide
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 30, 2008, 10:18:37 AM
Art,

your caterpillar is a "Deilephila elpenor" or "Elephant Hawk-moth".
Normally it lives on Epilobium or Galium.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Tony Willis on August 30, 2008, 11:10:03 AM
Arthur

I would love to see either the caterpillar or the moth in my garden.What a lovely thing
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Michael J Campbell on August 30, 2008, 07:34:02 PM
Petrocosmea begonifolia
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: art600 on August 30, 2008, 10:35:00 PM
Thanks Wim for the identification.  I do have some Epilobium in the 'wild' part of the garden, along with nettles.  I can now tell friends that my weeds attracted something special.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Gerdk on August 31, 2008, 01:44:53 PM
Here are a few pics made in the garden today

1. Streptocarpus rexii - the original (of course potgrown)
2. Oxalis purpurea Ken Aslet
3. Oxalis squamata and Leucojum roseum
4. Anthemis nobilis Pleniflora
5. - 7. Viola arborescens  - which flowers again in autumn regularly

Gerd
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 31, 2008, 03:58:08 PM
Two plants that are flowering in my garden now:

1) Fuchsia arborescens
2) Sedum telephium

Wim
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: johanneshoeller on August 31, 2008, 07:21:12 PM
Petrocosmea spec.?
and a South African plant. Does anybody know the name?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 31, 2008, 07:44:27 PM
Hans, I think this may be a fine dark flowered form of Petrocosmea minor . :-\
The other is a plant which I still think of as a Lapeirousia, but I think it is more properly known now as Anomatheca laxa... :-[.....these names will confuse me forever!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Michael J Campbell on August 31, 2008, 07:48:24 PM
Anomatheca  laxa
Synonym:Freesia laxa
Synonym:Lapeirousia cruenta
Synonym:Lapeirousia laxa


Take your pick
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on August 31, 2008, 08:07:29 PM
Wim, do you grow Fuchsia arborescens outside all year or do you have it in a container to bring inside for winter?
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: WimB on August 31, 2008, 09:18:07 PM
Maggi,

I grow it in a container and bring it inside for winter. I don't think it can stand even a bit of frost.
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Thomas Huber on September 01, 2008, 01:10:20 PM
The last August photos:
Idea by Daddy, made by Chris and Celine: Sempervivum pots  :o
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Maggi Young on September 01, 2008, 01:14:05 PM
These are a charming idea Thomas.. I love the way that sempevivum are so pleased to grow in all sorts of places... it seems that Chris and Celine are enjoying this too 8)
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on September 01, 2008, 01:16:39 PM
Two wonderful pots Thomas !!  Please congratulate the young Hubi's !  ;)
You've got your succession ensured !  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Thomas Huber on September 01, 2008, 01:24:20 PM
Will give the compliments to the young Hubi's, thanks!  8)
By the way, the pots were from my grandma, placed in my
basement for the last 15 years!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Katherine J on September 02, 2008, 07:34:30 AM
Very nice!
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Cris on September 02, 2008, 09:48:59 AM
Hi,

What a beautiful photo of Anomatheca/Freesia laxa, :) I miss mine, now in dormancy.

Thomas, congratulations for those pots, they are great. And the last one, near the colchicums(?), it's very nice. I wish to can have my garden to make places like these.

A days ago someone trough away a pot with Sempervivum and Echeveria. I picked them with me, I could let them there, don't you agree?
The first one are still blooming (beautiful rose flowers). All are a little dry, and these weekend I want to repott them.  And with your pots so well done, I've already an idea for these Sempervivum.  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Thomas Huber on September 02, 2008, 10:09:09 AM
Cris, thanks for saving those beauties from the rubbish!!
Good luck with'em - if you need help I could send my Chris to Portugal  ;D
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: olegKon on September 03, 2008, 05:51:28 AM
Oleg - Are the Galtonias growing outdoors and overwintering there?

johnw
They are growing outdoors but I have to dig them up after the first frost in autumn and overwinter them in dry sand in the fridge or cellar to plant them in the garden at the beginning of May
Title: Re: Flowers and Foliage August 2008
Post by: Cris on September 03, 2008, 01:40:21 PM
Thanks Thomas :)
Are your little child that make these pots? Congratulations to them ;)