Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Travel / Places to Visit => Topic started by: t00lie on January 05, 2009, 08:45:51 AM

Title: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on January 05, 2009, 08:45:51 AM
David Lyttle (aka Mountain Goat --Maggi please note....), and i have spent the last two days out and about up high.
Some nice plants and wildlife seen.
Only one pic for the time being--This fella ,(or gal), rested just long enough for a picture before hopping away.

Cheers dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on January 05, 2009, 09:26:22 AM
Rightio just a couple more.

Ranunculus pachyrrhizus showing the variation at differing periods of maturity.

Cheers dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 10:54:40 AM
Ooh! Not only Mr Buttercup will be pleased by these Ranunculus pix, Dave .....they're yummy.... great to see such detail.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 05, 2009, 10:59:03 AM
Pleased to see Dave has made it safely home - he probably got back before me.
For all his overseas fans here is a picture of the man above the Nevis valley on the southern end of the Hector Mountains.  Ian Y will be familiar with the spot as he was there last year. This year we had more clement weather and time to go exploring.

Next the view looking south down the Mataura Valley where the main highway from Lumsden to Queenstown goes.

Picture 3 is looking west to the Upper Mataura into the heart of the Eyre Mountains home of many famous plants.

Picture 4 is looking down into the Nevis Valley. Again Ian Y will be familiar with this particular valley having driven through it last year.

Picture 5 is a real violet Viola cunninghamii ( for Gerd)

Picture 6 is a Celmisia hybrid. The parents of this plant are Celmisia sessiliflora and Celmisia lyallii both of which were growing near by. We recorded 15 species of Celmisia at this locality;  C alpina, C. brevifolia, C. densiflora, C. gracilenta,  C. haastii, C. hectori,  C. laricifolia, C. lyallii, C. prorepens,  C. ramulosa, C. semicordata var stricta, C. sessiliflora,  C. verbascifolia,  C. viscosa, C. walkeri.  There may have been another two species present but we did not get a good look at them.

Picture 7 is Celmisia prorepens. This species and Celmisia densiflora are very similar and where the two occur together they hybridise giving a range of intermediate forms.. Celmisia densiflora has white tomentum on the undersurface of its leaves; Celmisia prorepens does not.

Picture 8 is Celmisia viscosa

Picture 9 is Aciphylla scott-thomsonii always a stunning plant with its architextural form and yellow infloresence.

Picture 10 is a unidentified species of Myosotis growing in a wind scoop. It is not Myosotis pulvinaris but may be Myosotis cheesemanii or something close to it.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 05, 2009, 11:04:20 AM
Ooh! they're yummy.... great to see such detail.

You mean the grasshoppers don't you Maggi, there is more sustenance in them than a buttercup!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 11:12:09 AM
It IS a nice bug, David, but protein isn't everything in a balanced diet, y'know!


Ian is coming over all nostalgic for his trips with you Guys! What great good fortune he had to be shown these places with you.... though the weather was rather dodgy when you all stayed the Nevis Hilton, I think !

Is the name Celmisia x linearis a valid one for that beautiful hybrid?  Suberb foliage plant, isn't it?
That whole area is some sort of daisy heaven, I reckon.


Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on January 05, 2009, 01:43:48 PM
Dave,
Thank you so much - at least the first pic (for me) of this rare violet in its natural
environment.  Does ist experience very low temps (with snow cover) in winter?
Is it growing in a wet or in a dry region?

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Senecio 2 on January 05, 2009, 08:31:23 PM
Celmisia x linearis is not just a foliage plant Maggie. This pic taken 5th November

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Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 09:03:33 PM
How lovely, Stuart..... I just meant that EVEN OUT of flower, it looked great... even better with those daisies, though!  8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on January 05, 2009, 09:48:55 PM
Great photos :)
That unidentified Myosotis looks quite intersting the flowers are very much like cheesmanii but the leaves look a bit different not so glaucous. cheesmanii always grows in the lee of big rocks in quite gravelly exposed soil. Where did this plant grow? It looks like there has a bit of vegetation surrounding it? I reckon if someone studied Myosotis in NZ carefully they could come up with lots of new species but all quite close to each other.

That's a great photo of C. linearis in cultivation. I don't think linearis is a proper name really but its quite useful.

Iv seen Viola cunninghamii at 2000m on the Remarkables Range so I expect it gets pretty cold I think it was in a snow bank though so probably gets protected from snow over the winter. Although of course frosts occur at any time at that height.

Our baby daughter Chihiro Aimee was born on the 27 December so the only mountains Iv been climbing recently have been a mountain of nappies. Looking forward to the seed season though.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on January 05, 2009, 10:02:18 PM
Congratulations Ross and to your lovely lady whose name - forgive me - I have forgotten. I guess this little one will grow up not only bilingual but with an overwhelming interest in all things alpine. Perhaps she could be encouraged to seek out Japanese hepaticas, irises, primulas, hostas for us, and Dicentra peregrina of course.

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on January 05, 2009, 10:14:45 PM
Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

Prefers moist soil and while it will be under snow in the wild it grows easily in the garden here with no winter protection.It grows so well that i have to make sure i make an effort at deadheading to reduce the number of seedlings appearing.
A small tufted plant that is said to have along flowering season although in my experience if it gets too dry ,this is not so.

Stuart
Nice to finally see a Celmisia  x linearis in flower.
I have been visiting the particular plant that David L posted for the past 4 years and never seen it in bloom.(I believe this one is a hybrid between C.sessiliflora and C. lyallii).

Maggi
Daisy heaven indeed.There are at least 4 different hybrids that i know of as well as an interesting large leafed/flower form of C.hectorii that we didn't sight as 'mountain goat' was keen to visit his beloved,(wink), wetland bogs on the other side of the ridge.

Hello Ross
my congratulations on the addition to the family.

Cheers dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 10:21:49 PM
I think, from various researches, that Celmisia x linearis is an accepted name.

Many congratulations to Ross and his lady wife on the arrival of the charmingly named Chihiro Aimee, which sounds so pretty and feminine, as I am sure the youngster will turn out to be.... even if she does whizz up mountains in a few years time !

T00lie, did you have a nice birthday?  Scottie and I raised a toast to you.... in tea and cake, of course! :-* :-*
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on January 05, 2009, 11:01:22 PM
Maggi/Scottie
Thanks for the toast.

As i was out in the field it was very low key---not even a piece of birthday cake.

If the weather is okay in the next day or so i plan to head up into Northern Fiordland botanizing again and as
there is a planned delayed celebration this Sunday ,now that a couple of the family have recovered from a continued bout of stomach upsets over the xmas/new year period, i'm looking forward to that.

Cheers dave.

 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 11:06:45 PM
Quote
a couple of the family have recovered from a continued bout of stomach upsets
glad to hear the bugs are over.... here in the UK it seemsto have been horrible coughs and flu-like bugs which were laying so many folks low. :P

Quote
there is a planned delayed celebration this Sunday

Excellent....... we'll raise another toast then! 8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 05, 2009, 11:08:17 PM
Go safe in those mountains, T00lie... remember, if you fall over now, without those purple long johns, no-one will be able to find you!  :o ::) :P
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on January 06, 2009, 12:30:56 AM
Ross & Dave,
Thank you both for your remarks (+pic) concerning Viola cunninghamii.
This species or Viola lyallii (don't remember exactly) survived a few years outside here (USDA zone 7 b) - but deadheading wasn't necessary  ;D

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 07, 2009, 10:53:03 AM
Congratulations Ross, on the arrival of your new daughter

The consensus of opinion is that the Myosotis is similar to M. cheesemanii but not conspecific with it. (That is my view and someone who is very familar with Myosotis cheesemanii).

 I will post a few more pictures. Most of these plants are snowbank plants that emerge and flower immediately after the snow covering them melts.

Picture 1 is Psychrophila obtusa formerly known as Caltha obtusa. It is a classic snow bank plant. The flowers are formed during the previous summer and open immediately after the snow covering the plant has melted.

Pictures 2 and 3 are Ranunculus pachyrrhizus. This plant is a Central Otago endemic and is more or less confined to schist mountains.

Picture 4 is Gaultheria nubicola. This tiny epacrid was flowering en masse growing in extensive patches.

Picture 5 is Gaultheria nubicola and Coprosma perpusilla. There is a little Kellaria that is about ot flower and a shoot of Anaphalioides bellidioides in the picture as well

Picture 6 is Coprosma perpusilla The fruits are formed during the previous season and ripen during the present season so flowers and ripe fruits may be present at the same time.

Pictures 7 and 8 are of Ourisia glandulosa. Another species of Ourisia, Ourisia caespitosa was also present but did not seem to be flowering paticularly well. I used flash when I took the picture to freeze the movement of the flowers in the wind as Ourisia flowers tend move with the slightest breeze so it is not an entirely satisfactory picture. The whites are a bit stark.

Pictures 9 and 10 are of a relatively rare plant Parahebe trifida. Dave looked at it and said Chionohebe densifolia which it resembles closely. The flowers are very similar in size and there is a hint of colour before the bud is completely open. However the leaves are toothed. Chionohebes and Parahebes have been confounding plant taxonomists for decades and the latest paper I have read places them both in Veronica. There is a Chionohebe densifolia variant  from the North Dunstan Range that has toothed leaves. I am now of the view that they all just grow on there own mountain and do their own thing and do not read the scientific literature.  The Parahebe trifida was flourishing in late snowbanks helped along by a liberal dosing of sheep manure. The sheep seem to camp on these sites during the summer.

I have a lot more pictures but probably do not have enough time to post them as I am off again next week.  There are some really neat plants from the Remarkables leg of the field trip but these will have to wait to later.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 07, 2009, 01:05:18 PM
Quote
I have a lot more pictures but probably do not have enough time to post them as I am off again next week.  There are some really neat plants from the Remarkables leg of the field trip but these will have to wait to later.

 No worries, David, we can wait!  :D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: maggiepie on January 07, 2009, 03:18:14 PM
The Gaultheria nubicola reminds me of the wild blueberry bushes around here.
The Ourisia glandulosa is beautiful.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: maggiepie on January 07, 2009, 03:20:40 PM
Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

What a lovely little viola.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on January 07, 2009, 04:52:53 PM
What an unusual white and large flowering kind of marsh marigold! According Wikipedia it is related to Caltha appendiculata and C. sagittata from South America.
Appendiculata is hardy here (USDA 7 b) but without showy flowers.

Did seed of Psychrophyla obtusa ever reach the Northern Hemisphere?

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 07, 2009, 05:44:57 PM
More wonderful photos, David.

I have been searching half the day to find a meaning or derivation for Psychrophila/ Psychrophyla.... was having no luck at all ... in the end I went with searching just for the prefix.... which found me this:
psy·chro·phil·ic
adj.
Thriving at relatively low temperatures. Used of certain bacteria.

Now then, if the prefix could find me that adjective, would you not have thought the wonders of the world wide web could have found  psychrophila for me?  >:(
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Diane Clement on January 07, 2009, 06:07:10 PM
I have been searching half the day to find a meaning or derivation for Psychrophila/ Psychrophyla.... was having no luck at all ... in the end I went with searching just for the prefix.... which found me this:
psy·chro·phil·ic    adj   Thriving at relatively low temperatures. Used of certain bacteria.
Now then, if the prefix could find me that adjective, would you not have thought the wonders of the world wide web could have found  psychrophila for me?  >:(   


Psychro (cold) phila (loving)
I just put psychrophilia   psychrophila into a search engine and found 41000 entries! - many are specific names of plants
Here's a couple of links for psychrophilic and psychrophile
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychrophilic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychrophilic)
http://myword.info/sendword.php?psychro_1-a (http://myword.info/sendword.php?psychro_1-a)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on January 07, 2009, 06:40:58 PM
David, super pictures of great plants.
For me is Coprosma perpusilla the absulute winner.
Aaah, having a creeping plant in the rockery with such berries.  8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on January 07, 2009, 06:48:06 PM
David,

Many thanks for a wonderful set of plants. Really enjoyed viewing them.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on January 07, 2009, 06:48:17 PM
Well, you see, that's the difference... I was searching for Psychrophila or  Psychrophyla, looking for the meaning for a botanical name.... it never occurred to me to search for psychrophilia....and now that I have, I tend to wish I hadn't! ::)

I hate being so cold I can't think straight!  ;D

Diane.... thanks for the pps message   :)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Diane Clement on January 07, 2009, 08:16:49 PM
it never occurred to me to search for psychrophilia....and now that I have, I tend to wish I hadn't! ::)

nor me, it was a typo  ::)  ::) I put in psychrophila   SORRY  I wish I hadn't either, this is getting too silly. 

I hate being so cold I can't think straight!  ;D 

I can't even type  straight

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on January 07, 2009, 08:34:58 PM
Well sorry, but I plan to stick with Caltha for now. Caltha obtusa has a delicious perfume as an added attraction.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 08, 2009, 10:50:11 AM
Hello everyone. Thank you all for your kind comments. I see that each one of you have their own favourite  plant from my last posting.

Gerd. I do not think the Psychrophila could be grown successfully at lower altitudes because of its specialised habitat (snowbanks) and requirement for winter chilling. It might be possible to grow it in Europe where it would get sufficient winter chilling for its proper development.

As several you have figured out Psychrophila  means "cold loving" a reference to the plant being confined to snowbanks This and other morphological features are the reason Psychrophila was separated from Caltha. There is a second species Psychrophila novae-zelandiae with yellow flowers but I have not seen it as the two species tend not to occur together.

One picture tonight the South Island edelweiss Leucogenes grandiceps. This plant strikes very easily from cuttings but I have never managed to get it to flower or to keep it for any length of time.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on January 08, 2009, 07:58:13 PM
Once again very nice pics David, Once again, wish I was in the hills  :(

Thanks Maggie for educating me on the meaning of Psychrophila (or psycho-feeler as I sometimes call it) Its possibly the most annoying name change ever Caltha was such a nice easy name and one even I could spell.

Gerd: seed does reach the Northern Hemisphere, when I get lucky every so often.
Also it does grow at lower altitudes, here is a photo taken today. It flowered for me this year as well but I didn't get a good photo of that. Its easy enough to grow if you prick the seedlings out early and keep the roots cool. I use a polystyrene trough to do this.
As I'm sure David could tell you, the plant formerly known as Caltha produces flower buds for the next season during the current growing season. So that if you were to dissect the plant in summer you would see next springs flower buds. As I only have 3 plants in cultivation I'm not going to do that! This means flowers can burst out of the melting snow as soon as possible. 



Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on January 08, 2009, 10:20:16 PM
David & Ross,
Thank you. It seems there is a glimmer of hope this extraordinary plant will be introduced to the NH  :D

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 09, 2009, 10:57:43 AM
Ross,
Good you were successful in growing and flowering Psychrophila - I dont think I would have much success out here.

This time have have some pictures of small things to post

Pictures 1 and 2 are cushions of Phyllachne colensoi. Despite it being a very common plant it is always impressive in flower.

Picture 3 is Abrotanella caespitosa. It is a tiny plant with incospicuous flowers. The plant in the foreground has one flower.

Picture 4 is Anisotome lanuginosa. It is growing in a cushion of Raoulia hectori so the grey woolly leaves are not obvious.

Picture 5 is a tiny Cardamine. I think it is Cardamine depressa but someone might know better. I grow plenty of Cardamines but not this one.

Picture 6 is a tiny Leptinella growing in a boggy turf. I am guessing that it is Leptinella pusilla. It has the most remarkable honey-scented flowers. Dave discovered this when He was photographing the plant with his nose down inches from it.

Picture 7 is Celmisia alpina. This species is very similar to Celmisia gracilenta but is smaller and confined to subalpine bogs.

Picture 8 is Raoulia grandiflora. Again it is a very common plant and has the largest flowers of all the Raoulias.

Picture 9 is  a flowering plant of Dracophyllum prostratum.  This species grows in subalpine bogs. It was growing in profusion at this locality.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on January 09, 2009, 06:30:59 PM
Dave and David,

thank you for introducing these alpine beauties from NZ.
I can't comment on specific issues - just study and learning ;) 8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 12, 2009, 10:54:03 AM
Just a few scenic pictures tonight - I am away to Nelson for 3 weeks leaving tomorrow morning. This is a new part of the country for me so I will be interested to see what I can find. It is a very diffferent topography from Otago with  mountains made out of limestone.

In the meantime back to the South Hector Mountains.

Picture 1 We walked along the ridge crest until we reached a point just above the two patches of snow on the left and headed back dropping down into a series of alpine bogs below the crags on the skyline.The snow melt flows down into this area giving rise to an extensive wetland with its own suite of plants. The plant in the foreground is Celmisia lyallii.

Picture 2  Dave negotiating the slopes below the schist crags.

Picture 3  Descending to bog and tarns Hector Mountains

Picture 4 At bog and tarns

Picture 5 more wetlands

Picture 6 Little stream surrounded by mosses

Picture 7 Closeup view of stream showing surrounding vegetation . The white flowers are Oxalis magellanica

Picture 8 Detail of vegetation, the red is an Epilobium

Picture 9 Colours and textures in the bog vegetation.

Picture Colony of Bulbinella angustifolia

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 12, 2009, 11:35:12 AM
Continuing from the previous posting

Picture 1 Bulbinella angustifolia

Picture 2 More bogs

Picture 3 Stream with Celmisia verbascifolia

Picture 4 Celmisia verbascifolia

Picture 5 Celmisia verbascifolia growing by little waterfall. This particular form was formerly known as Celmisia petiolata. It is characterised by the prominent purple midribs but is now considered to be a form of Celmisia verbascifolia.

Picture 6 shows the schist crags above the wetland: the streams are flowing down between the rock outcrops.

Picture 7 is another view of the bogs and schist outcrops.

Picture 8 is a pyramid of schist. The view is looking across the upper Nevis Valley to the Garvie Mountains beyond.

Picture 9 is Geum uniflorum. I was surprised to see it growing here. Generally it prefers the wetter mountains further west
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on January 12, 2009, 12:58:56 PM
More great shots David ! Love the Celmisia near the small waterfall  8)   Pure nature ! 
Looking at these shots I always wonder from behind which rock the hobbits will appear...  ;D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: maggiepie on January 12, 2009, 02:38:02 PM
Terrific pics David, I would kill for some of those rocks.
I love the little geum uniflorum.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 12, 2009, 06:05:17 PM
Hello Helen, Luc,

Pleased you liked the pictures; I hoped to show the habitats some of these plants grow in. Alpine bogs have their own characteristic flora.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ruweiss on January 12, 2009, 08:15:03 PM
David, thank you so much for these beautiful pictures. They bring back sweet memories from our trip to
NZ, the conference Alpines 96 and all the friendly and helpful people who made our stay so unforgetable.
The landscape and the flowers are so good against the winter blues! Please keep on the good work.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Senecio 2 on January 13, 2009, 06:58:40 PM
During a break in the scorching temperatures Canterbury has been subject to so far this year a small group of local SRGC members took the opportunity to visit Mt Hutt on Monday.  The first picture is the view looking down from the scree on the north side of the basin.

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On the rocks half-way up the scree were well established populations of Raoulia mammillaris.

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Just above the rocks were found the emerging stems of Haastia sinclairii, some already in flower.

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Also in this area were isolated specimens of Lobelia roughii, past flowering but their foliage is worth viewing.

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The rest of the scree was fairly barren apart from foliage of the odd Ranunculus haastii.

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and occasional Leptinella atrata.

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After making tracks down the scree to the area under the ski-tows this magnificent specimen of Ranunculus haastii in fruit was found.

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Further down in the area surrounding the stream draining the basin were, Celmisia sessiliflora,

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Aciphylla monroi,

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and an Ourisia sp.,

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There were also good flowering specimens of many alpines seen on the road up to the ski field, I’ll do these on another post.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on January 13, 2009, 07:56:03 PM
That fruiting Ranunculus haastii is TO DIE FOR!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Senecio 2 on January 13, 2009, 08:48:58 PM
Unfortunately Cliff we’ll probably get beaten to the seed, the area is just too accessible. Continuing with plants seen on Monday’s trip to Mt Hutt firstly some more from the stream area. More Leptinella atrata,
 
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another Aciphylla monroi,

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and another Leptinella sp.

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The next pictures are all of plants near the road leading up to the buildings associated with the tourist and skiing activities. Firstly a colourful Epilobium sp.,
 
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Colobanthus acicularis, an excellent and easy cushion plant in cultivation,

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Brachyglottis bellidioides

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Montia sp. (previously Neopaxia)

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I’ll finish with Leucogenes grandiceps

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These and many other specimens of Leucogenes grandiceps can be seen on the rock faces along the road. In some instances so close it is possible to lean out of the car and touch them.

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Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on January 15, 2009, 08:09:05 PM
Hi Senicio 2, Great photos from Mt. Hutt  :D
 I dont want to be annoying but here are some of my ideas on the names of some of your photos:

Aciphylla monroi= A montana
Leptinella sp.= L dendyi
Ourisia sp = O caespitosa I think

Did you see the Hasstia recurva Raoulia eximia or Ranunculus crithmifolius?
Mt hutt is a great place is a shame the ski field has bulldozed such large areas above the skifield buildings, those areas are now pretty sterile and plantless. The same kind of thing happens on the Remarkables ski field. Hares are pretty hard on Ranunculus seed as well.
 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 29, 2009, 10:00:50 AM
I am now back home after my trip to Nelson. This particular buttercup, Ranunculus insignis grows prolifically up there. I saw many plants that were new to me and and encountered a diverse range of vegetation and landscapes.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on January 29, 2009, 10:44:21 AM
Ranunculus insignis is one of the easiest to grow here in the U.K., David. It seems to survive our winters, but loses a number of it's leaves. Can't wait for the rest of your images.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 30, 2009, 11:33:35 AM
Hi Cliff,

I am pleased you can grow Ranunculus insignis - it seems a little less demanding than some of the others.
These are not exactly alpine images but I will post them on this thread anyway - you can at least see the mountains from this portion of the coast and the plants are interesting subjects in themselves. The first photos were taken on a walk round the Kaikoura Peninsula where you can take a track along the cliff tops and return via the beach. Tourists go to watch whales and swim with dolphins and that sort of thing. I dont have enough money to swim with dolphins or watch whales so a walk had to suffice for me.
The Kaikoura Penisula is made of limestone that has been subjected to a lot of tectonic activity as shown by the folded strata in Picture 2. The coastal formations in Pictures 3 and 4 are the consequence of wave erosion and tectonic uplift - the entire Peninsula has been rising.

There is an enormous breeding colony of red-billed gulls on the beaches. This species is not endangered and the bird are unconcerned by numerous walkers going past.
Picture 5 is a juvenile bird and picture 6 is an adult bird.

The other common species of gull the black-backed gull also breeds there. Picture 7 is a juvenile black-backed gull.

There are numerous fur seals tucked away in crevices in the rocks. One Irish tourist almost stepped on one while we were there. Picture 8 is a fur seal having a nap. Most of them know well enough just to stay out of the path of people. One gentleman asked me where he could see the seals having already walked past a dozen or so.

Picture 9 is of Pachystegia insignis the Marlborough Rock Daisy found in the drier North Eastern part of the South island in abundance. It clings to bluffs growing out of rock crevices. Phormiun tenax also grows on these dry coastal cliffs despite it being happy to grow in swamps.

Picture 10 is of the sand convolvulus Calystegia soldanella which grows on the high tide mark.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on January 30, 2009, 07:04:45 PM
Delighted to view the photographs, David. Many thanks.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ruweiss on January 30, 2009, 07:55:21 PM
David, nature is so beautiful- thanks for taking us to this paradise.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: hadacekf on January 30, 2009, 08:25:54 PM
Wonderful photographs, David Thank you
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 31, 2009, 10:21:30 AM
Hi Paddy, Rudi, Franz,

I am pleased you enjoyed the photos here are some more to follow.

Picture 1 on is a view up the coast from the Kaikoura Peninsula.

We left the fleshpots of Kaikoura and headed up the coast to the little hamlet of Waipapa Bay where we pitched our tent for the night. The coastal strip is very narrow at this point. The campground is squeezed between the some bluffs and the main road. On the other side of the road is the railway and beyond that the ocean. During the night between the trains and semi-trailers passing we heard some scraping noises followed by muffled yelping. In the morning we were greeted by this sight so we rapidly packed up and headed up the road (without stopping for breakfast). The locals call it Kray Kong as it likes to climb over buildings and vehicles when it comes out of the water maurauding. There is rumoured to be an even larger one called "Tickles" about as well. They come out of the Kaikoura Canyon offshore. An American film crew on location in Kaikoura disappeared a couple of years ago but the authorities at the time kept it fairly quiet at the time possibly because it would frighten overseas tourists away. Whether the Americans found "Tickles" or meet with some other mishap is not known. It is sometimes difficult to establish the precise truth of events of this nature.

Back to the mountains - Picture 3 is Clematis afoliata showing it seed heads.

We  went up the Waima River to visit Sawcut Gorge. The entry to the reserve is through Blue Mountain Station. The lady who lives there has created a remarkable and quite beautiful garden on a very difficult site. The Waima River flows through some rugged limestone country. Picture 4 shows the first gorge of the Waima. Pictures 5- 8 are more views of the Gorge.

The route proceeds partly up through the river and in places there is a formed track on the bank through small patches of forest. There were several large totara trees (Podocarpus totara) in this particular patch (Picture 9) shown again in Picture 10
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on January 31, 2009, 11:39:02 AM
Just on past the trees the valley opens a little and Isolation Creek enters the Waima on the true right through a very narrow cleft through the limestone bluffs. This is Sawcut Gorge (Picture 1)

Picture 2 shows Isolation Creek issuing from the opening

Once through the entrance to Sawcut Gorge you can look back downstream (Picture 3) or upwards (Picture 4)

Isolation Creek continues flanked by limestone bluffs upstream before it eventually opens out (Picture 5). We did not continue much further past this point.

Various plants grow on the steep limestone walls. Wahlenbergia mathewsii is a local endemic confined to limestone. The was the first ime I had ever seen this plant and I Had no idea what it was until I found one that was flowering. ( Pictures 6 & 7)

Picture 8 is Blechnum novae-zelandiae growing out of the limestone. It sems to be growing in a very inhospitable environment for a fern but there must be enough water seeping through the limestone to sustain it.

Picture 9 is Pachystegia insignis which was growing in profusion on the bluffs.

Picture 10 is the broom Carmichaelia camichaeliae formerly known as Notospartium carmichaeliae. ( This is my best guess for this species as I did not see it flowering). Apparently it was a poor flowering year this year for all the brooms.

There was also a Celmisia growing there that I think was Celmisia monroi. It looks like a smaller version of Celmisia semicordata. Ranunculus insignis was also present

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 03, 2009, 10:04:53 AM
This posting is from Mt Arthur, Nelson where a short walk through forest from the road end takes you to treeline and the alpine zone. A feature of the forest here is Dracophyllum traversii. These trees are growing on a ridge crest on thin fairly poor soil in forest dominated by mountain beech (Nothofagus solandri var cliffortioides). New Zealand has many species of Dracophyllum;mosr are shrubs but a few including this species are small trees. The genus was formerly placed in the family Epacridaceae but has now been subsumed into Ericaceae. There is a closely related species Dracophyllum elegantissimum that grows in similar situations.

Pictures 1-5 are Dracophyllum traversii

Picture 6 shows details of the foliage and inflorescence which is terminal in this species.

Picture 7 is a forest species of Myosotis, Myosotis forsterii.

Picture 8 is Celmisia dallii which is confined to North West Nelson

Picture 9 is Celmisia travesii which is characterised by the brown tomentum seen here on the margins of the leaves. It has a discontinuous distribution being found in Fiordland in the south-west of the South island and in Nelson which is in the north west. There is a view that the species originally evolved in one locality and the present discontinuous distribution is the result of movement of the alpine fault. The geological record clearly shows that North -West Nelson was once contiguous with Fiordland. However I am not convinced that this is the explanation for the for the present distribution of this species.

Picture 10 shows Celmisia traversii and Ranunculus insignis growing on the side of a limestone sinkhole.

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 03, 2009, 01:20:47 PM
Interesting and beautiful pictures again David.
Looking at those Dracophyllum traversii where some are looking really old,
raises the question about them how many years they may be?
And is the climate where they grow less cold then in other places on South Island?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 04, 2009, 10:14:01 AM
Hi Luit,

I do not think the Dracophyllum trees are very old. There appears to be a complete range of sizes from small seedlings to the large trees I photographed. They seem to be replacing themselves so I think there must be a steady turnover. My guess is that the larger specimens would be 50 - 100 years old.

It is warmer in the northern part of the South Island than in the southern part. The net effect is to depress the tree line in the south so at the tree line the climate would be comparable in the north and the south. What I am trying to say is that you would find comparable conditions in the north and the south but in the south they would occur at a lower elevation. In the south the largest Dracophyllum is Dracophyllum fiordense. It usually has a single trunk crowned with a tuft of leaves and look a bit like a small Cordyline.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 04, 2009, 09:34:56 PM
David, thank you for this information. You're living in such an interesting country.
Would love to see that all myself, but alas rather far away  :( :(   :'(
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 06, 2009, 09:53:41 AM
Luit,

I am still seeing plants that are new to me. I find the New Zealand flora completely fascinating and even though I have more opportunity to see it than most I never fail to be surprised when I am out in the field. This next posting contains several plants that I have not been able to identify to species level.

Picture 1 is Celmisia spectabilis which is a common plant from Canterbury north.

Picture 2 is Celmisia sessiliflora a common but very attractive cushion species.

Picture 3 is a Celmisia I have not been able to positively identify - It could be Celmisia allanii, Celmisia dicolor or Celmisia incana. It forms large patches and is common on Mt Arthur. It is  a spectacular sight in flower.

Picture 4 and 5 are of a Euphrasia that I can not identify to species level. I thik they are the same species.

Picture 6 is another Euphrasia that I think is a different species. At the time I was photographing them I thought there was only one species butlooking at the photo I think they are different.

Picture 7 is Hebe macrantha

Picture 8 is Hebe coarctata a whipcord species found in the north -west part of the South Island.

Picture 9 and 10 are again two species of Hebe I have not been able to identify. I took a small library of reference books on my travel but not the one on Hebes.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on February 11, 2009, 08:05:38 AM
Nice pics David

I was away up north in *Canterbury (Craigieburn Forest Park), last weekend with members of the NZAGS and saw numerous large patches of Celmisia discolor with some variation in the leaf colouring ,from grey to greyish green so i cannot id your pic 3 either.

* Saw some fabulous plants ---particularly this wonderful specialized scree plant in flower --Lignocarpa carnosula --it's congested leaves remind me somewhat of deers antlers .


Cheers Dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 11, 2009, 08:17:23 AM
Oh Dave ... magnificent!  I have germinated this lovely little thing three times now, but lost the tiny seedlings almost immediately.  I am certain that it is growable, but certainly not easy.
Many thanks for posting and kind regards.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 11, 2009, 11:30:51 AM
Hi Dave,

I wondered when you would be posting again: you have been a bit quiet lately. When I was up on Mt Arthur I was thinking that you would have been pretty excited to see all the alpines up there - all totally unlike what you and I are used to seeing down here. However it started to rain and Belinda was shepherding me off the mountain so I did not get to spent as much time there as I would have liked. An excuse to go back sometime. I saw the Lignocarpa on Island Pass on the way home. Our Canterbury friends had already been there as there were bootmarks all over the scree with little stone cairns marking the most photogenic plants.

Cliff,

These screes have a very mobile upper layer over a fine silty layer which can be quite moist at times. This under-layer was very hard and unyielding on the Island Pass scree when I visited it - a bit like concrete. However this information is unlikely to assist anyone in their attempts to grow these plants and probably just increases the frustration levels af would be growers. The whole plant drys and breaks off acting as a tumble weed to disperse the seeds. I suspect in general these plants are not particularly long-lived.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 11, 2009, 11:57:38 AM
Many thanks David,
I suspected as much about the silty layer, but always supposed that this would be reasonably fluid and sand-like in its consistency - without the addition of the 'cement' (quote - 'a bit like concrete') in fact?
An excess of moisture would therefore probably run off the scree (through the rocky exterior) rather than be absorbed by that immediate area?
The plants have obviously adapted to the possibility of decapitation by rolling detritus - very short life expectation and plenty of seeds - I am still encouraged to keep trying ... I love a challenge.
Many thanks.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 11, 2009, 08:32:33 PM
Super plants and pics. I love the Lignocarpa especially since it's no longer caller Stellaria :D or "chickweed."

Some seeds arrived in yesterday's post Dave, for us to share. I'll send off half today. Many thanks Diane.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on February 12, 2009, 08:37:05 AM
Thanks Lesley(and Diane).

Lesley i didn't realize that the Lignocarpa had once been called Stellaria.

I went looking at my reference books and the only name change i can find is in Philipson and Hearns 1962 book of 'Rock Garden Plants Of The Southern Alps' where the plant was previously known as Anisotome carnosula.

All good fun these name changes,(not!!).

Cliff thank you for your kind words --i also think it is growable --i just have to find someone who has had success --smile.

Cheers dave. 

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 12, 2009, 08:48:27 AM
Lesley,

Lignocarpa was never called Stelleria.  It was formerly known as Anisotome carnulosa and belongs to the family Apiaceae (Carrot family). Stelleria roughii the plant you are confusing it with is still Stellaria roughii and is a member of the family Caryophyllaceae and is still a chickweed.

For the record the name was changed in 1967!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 12, 2009, 08:57:53 AM
Stellaria roughii is, in itself, a little charmer and presents yet another challenge to keep in cultivation.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 12, 2009, 09:50:32 AM
I have a few more pictures from Mt Arthur to post.

While we are on the subject of chickweeds here is another one, Colobanthus masonae ( ID keyed from photo so I hope it is correct). It is growing in a natural crevice garden.

Picture 2 is an Epilobium growing on a limestone outcrop. I am not prepared to give it a species name.

Picture 3 is a general view of the vegetation showing the snow tussocks with various herbaceous plants (Celmisias and Aciphyllas) growing on the limestone outcrops.

Picture 4 is a view across to the Mt Arthur Tableland.

At this stage the mist and rain were stating to blow over. The summit of the mountain is obscured by the mist but you can see the glacier carved topography. The rock is predominantly limestone/marble. All the drainage goes down into sinkholes. There is an extensive cave system underneath the mountain. (Picture 5).

Picture 6 is a second view of the mountain.  If you look carefully you can see a party descending from the summit on the left.

Picture 7 shows a plant of Raoulia rubra. The plants were all growing on a rock outcrop that was not limestone.

Picture 8 shows a colony of Raoulia rubra.

Picture 9 shows the detail of the Raoulia cushion There are a few red flowers on the top left of the picture. The red flowers give this species its name.

Picture 10 is Ourisia lactea ( I am presuming it is this species: the references I am using are not completely current).
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 12, 2009, 09:56:41 AM
Superb stuff, David ... lovely celmisias and aciphyllas in the third image ... awaiting more with relish please.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 12, 2009, 10:01:43 AM
David ... from this great distance I would instantly have labelled the epilobium as E. glabellum ... what makes you doubt it please?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 12, 2009, 10:04:24 AM
Spot the difference, Pictures of Lignocarpa and Stellaria taken on the same scree at the same time.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on February 12, 2009, 10:09:25 AM
Great stuff once again David !  :o

Cool plants from a cool part of the world  8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 12, 2009, 10:13:18 AM
Cliff,

I am happy to accept Epilobium glabellum now you have pointed it out to me. Epilobium is a genus I find confusing as there are rather a lot of them.

Thanks Luc - it got a bit cool that afternoon on the mountain.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 12, 2009, 03:50:51 PM
Cliff,

I am happy to accept Epilobium glabellum now you have pointed it out to me. Epilobium is a genus I find confusing as there are rather a lot of them.
Beautiful pictures again David.
We used to grow a plant Epilobium glabellum with white flowers and I never saw any seeds,
(that's what I remember but might be wrong)
I have since never seen that plant again. It reached about 20 cm and the flowers where standing upright
like your pink one.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on February 12, 2009, 04:59:43 PM
David,

Magnificent countryside and fabulous flowers. Many thanks.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 12, 2009, 08:37:34 PM
Thanks gents. As soon as I turned off the computer and started to do dishes, I had doubts. Another (serious) senior moment. You are right of course and I am wrong. My apologies.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 12, 2009, 10:09:35 PM
Hi Paddy, Luit,

I am pleased you enjoyed the pictures from Mt Arthur. Epilobiums tend to produce a lot of seed and become weeds in rock gardens so despite their attractiveness I avoid growing them.

The next set of picture are of the Thousand Acre Plateau between the Matiri Valley and the Mokihinui Valley. The Matiri River is a tributary of the Buller River which flows into the sea  at Westport on the West Coast. The Mokihinui river reaches the sea north of Westport. The Thousand Acre Plateau is a bit like Conan Doyle's lost world but without the exotic menagerie and consequently the entertainment. So, sorry no Pterodactyls. This trip was a family affair with my wife Belinda and brother Ian.

We walked up the valley to Lake Matiri where we stayed at the the lake Matiri hut.

Picture 1 is a view of Lake Matiri looking down the valley.

Picture 2 is a view up the valley

Picture 3 is the last flat land we saw until we reached the plateau. The route to the plateau goes up a steep spur on the right of the photo.

Pictures 4 and 5 are views down the Matiri Valley from  the halfway point to the plateau.

Picture 6 is a view across the valley. The tree in the foreground with red flowers is the Southern rata (meterosideros umbellata)

Picture 7 is a view of the plateau rim. The route goes up through the tongue of forest on the right of the  limestone bluffs on the far left end.

Picture 8 is a view of the back down the track towards a large rata tree.

Picture 9 is a view of the forest on the upper part of the track. The terrain is somewhat chaotic at this point with large boulders that have fallen off the bluffs above with fallen trees etc. The track was a bit on the steep side as well.

Picture 10 is a view of the interior of the beech forest.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on February 12, 2009, 10:25:04 PM
My word, another magical place! 8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 13, 2009, 10:30:11 AM
Hi Maggi,

There is more to come; you have not seen the best yet

Picture 1 is the first view of the plateau as we reached the top and emerged from the forest.

Picture 2 and 3 were taken about half way across the plateau. The two prominent peaks in the second picture are the Needle on the left and the Haystack on the right.
Picture 3 shows a second smaller higher plateau to the left of the Needle named the Hundred Acres Plateau.

Picture 4 was taken a lot later in the day as we were approaching the Larrikin Creek which is situated at the northern end of the plateau. The hut is in the basin on the edge of the far clearing on the centre left. The landscape is formed by massive faulting and slumping with huge blocks of land being displaced.

Picture 5 shows the far side of Larrikin Creek showing the huge bluffs dropping down into the bed of the creek. it is a long way down.

It was with some relief we arrived at the hut as the crossing had be arduous and hot. Picture 6 shows the view from the door of the hut. The little clearing is covered with Hebe topiaria which was in flower.

Picture 7 shows the sunset looking back across the plateau to the south-west.

Picture 8 shows a clump of Dracophyllum traversii.

Picture 9 shows a flowering bush of Hebe topiaria with Celmisia semicordata in the foreground.

Picture 10 is Oreostylidium subulatum. Oreostylidium is related to Phyllachne. It si not a particularly good picture but I took it in a hurry on the march. The plant has multiple rossettes and grows in small patches.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 13, 2009, 11:48:17 AM
Fascinating sights - unbelievable for Central Europeans! Where are the houses,
streets or at least some grazing cattle?

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 14, 2009, 10:51:12 AM
Hi Gerd,

The nearest town is Murchison: Lake Matiri hut is about a three hour walk from the road end (or one and a half hours from the end of a 4WD farm track). Access to the plateau which is about 1000 metres involves a 700 metre climb from the valley floor from Lake Matiri. The climb is very steep as the route picks its way up through the bluffs beneath the plateau. The soils on the plateau are boggy and very infertile so they are not suitable for grazing livestock. It would be very difficult to move stock up there and even more difficult getting them off again. The area is part of Kahurangi National Park and has no buildings on it apart from a few huts.

Four more photos;

Larrikin Creek Hut
Approaching The Needle from the shelf beneath it
Summit of The Needle(1453 metres)
Looking back to Larrikin Creek Hut from the summit of the Needle. The hut is beneath the X.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on February 14, 2009, 05:02:49 PM
David,
you live in a fascinating country. :o

Should I win in a lottery I would make a world tour and make a stop to visit NZ  ;) ;D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 14, 2009, 06:04:18 PM
David,
you live in a fascinating country. :o
Should I win in a lottery I would make a world tour and make a stop to visit NZ  ;) ;D

David, fantastic views. Thank you!

Armin, if you need a porter I would like to offer my company!

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on February 14, 2009, 07:14:51 PM
Jean, the Wyllie wifie, is VERY fond of New Zealand and visits whenever she can.... the other day she got her updated New Zealand Alpine Garden Society badge...... here it is ......

[attach=1]

very nice , too
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 14, 2009, 08:38:04 PM
Mmmm, suppose I'd better order one.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on February 14, 2009, 09:02:46 PM
David,

This is a place to dream of visiting. Wonderful scenery and fabulous and exotic(for us) plants.

Many thanks for continuing this great thread; really enjoying it. As I've said before it is wonderful to be able to enjoy the N.Z. experience from the comfort of my armchair in the northern hemisphere.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on February 15, 2009, 07:52:47 AM
David

Looks like you had a nice spell of weather while over in the West Coast.
 
Interesting pics and descriptions --especially the comment on the steepness of the track -as a companion of yours on a few trips now ,for you to make that statement it must have been 'damn' steep.


I managed to get out yesterday onto a new area of the Hector Mtns.
The first pic is of what greeted me at the northern part of the Range-- as a result seed collecting was a bit hit and miss and the conditions made for very tricky conditions when descending later in the day.

A number of plants were flowering especially the Gentians.

Cheers Dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 15, 2009, 08:34:50 AM
Would that be Gentiana corymbifera, Dave?  Looks beautiful in it's natural habitat.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 15, 2009, 09:42:57 AM
Hi Paddy, Gerd, Armin,

Pleased you enjoyed the pictures; hope you all get to see the plants in their natural habitat some day.

Maggi,

It is a very nice badge, it almost makes me want to join the NZAGS to get one!

Dave,

Good to see you posting again you should not be grovelling round in the snow at this time of the year but as they say  "Snow happens". The route was a little steep - Belinda made a few comments on the way up but none on the way down. The only one I can post is " For the love of Pete".

Cliff,

My guess is that Dave's plant is Gentiana bellidifolia. G. corymbifira is a larger plant with more flowers hence the specific epithet corymibifera. It is monocarpic as well.

I have spent the day helping with a botanical survey of a little patch of bush on the Peninsula. It is full of Urtica ferox so I got a few touches and am still feeling it.
For this evenings posting here are a few more scenic shots from the summit of The Needle.

The Haystack and the Matiri Range with the Thousand Acres Plateau beyond
The Haystack showing the geological strata
Peaks of the Matiri Range
The Hundred Acres Plateau. This view shows the entire plateau.
Looking down across the Hundred Acres plateau to the Thousand Acres Plateau.
The canyon of Larrikin Creek cut down through the limestone strata.
Western rim of the Hundred Acres Plateau.
Looking west into the North Branch of the Mokihinui River. The sea is out beyond the last ridge on the horizon.
Looking north into the upper part of the Mokihinui River cachment.
My brother Ian siiting on top of The Needle texting - it was the only place on the entire plateau that he could find cell phone coverage

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 15, 2009, 09:46:36 AM
Cliff,

Gentiana corymbifera from Mt Hutt
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 15, 2009, 10:12:59 AM
Many thanks, David ... for the truly stunning pictures (oranges, ochres and greens that characterise these unique landscapes) and for the lovely image of G. corymbifera ... another gem that needs to be attempted over here.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on February 15, 2009, 08:26:18 PM
David,
you live in a fascinating country. :o
Should I win in a lottery I would make a world tour and make a stop to visit NZ  ;) ;D

David, fantastic views. Thank you!

Armin, if you need a porter I would like to offer my company!

Gerd

Gerd,
I would invite you to join! You are welcome any time ;) ;D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 15, 2009, 08:39:54 PM
Dave (Toole), there was some sort of seminar or something for rural fire fighters in the south at the weekend. It was featured on the box in last night's news. I could have sworn one of the participants was you, but I suppose not, if you were in the Hectors. I see "they" are talking about naming individual peaks in the Hectors with totally un-necessary names. Why don't they leave them alone? "The Hectors" is quite enough for those who know them.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 16, 2009, 04:06:15 AM
Hi everyone, some more shots from the NZAGS weekend. Take note of the Leptinella Dave, 50+ flower heads!
Great weekend, although it ended with an Aciphylla scott-thomsonii attack on the way down from foggy peak!

1. Leptinella atrata
2. Notothlaspi rosulatum
3. Gentiana corymbifera
4. Dolichoglottis scorzoneroides
5. Haastia recurva
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 16, 2009, 06:20:49 AM
A notothlaspi to DIE FOR! 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on February 16, 2009, 07:42:27 AM
You and the Aciphyllas don't seem to get along Doug !.

The Leptinella is a beauty ----Mmm !! ... i didn't see that particular one during the weekend.

Quote --- "Dave (Toole), there was some sort of seminar or something for rural fire fighters in the south at the weekend. It was featured on the box in last night's news. I could have sworn one of the participants was you, but I suppose not, if you were in the Hectors."

Lesley
Nope it wasn't me --could it have been my double i wonder ?. --Alan Newton of Pontepool .Wink.

Cliff
Sorry i should have put a label on my pic.

I know the plant as a variant of G bellidifolia --Unfortunately snow covered most of the basal foliage.
I don't think Gentian corymbifera grows that far south and as David has mentioned that is a far more substantial plant.

Cheers dave.   
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 16, 2009, 11:02:04 AM
David,
you live in a fascinating country. :o
Should I win in a lottery I would make a world tour and make a stop to visit NZ  ;) ;D

David, fantastic views. Thank you!

Armin, if you need a porter I would like to offer my company!

Gerd

Gerd,
I would invite you to join! You are welcome any time ;) ;D

Armin,
Before heading for the wide world I would recommend we'll visit Oirlich at the end of the month! Seems to be more realizable at the moment! ;D

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on February 16, 2009, 12:37:44 PM
Quote
Nope it wasn't me --could it have been my double i wonder ?. --Alan Newton of Pontepool .Wink.
It wasn't Alan Newton of PONTELAND, either.... he was down at Caerleon!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on February 16, 2009, 06:24:37 PM
David,
you live in a fascinating country. :o
Should I win in a lottery I would make a world tour and make a stop to visit NZ  ;) ;D

David, fantastic views. Thank you!

Armin, if you need a porter I would like to offer my company!

Gerd

Gerd,
I would invite you to join! You are welcome any time ;) ;D

Armin,
Before heading for the wide world I would recommend we'll visit Oirlich at the end of the month! Seems to be more realizable at the moment! ;D

Gerd

Gerd, o.k. I agree ;D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 16, 2009, 07:21:23 PM
A notothlaspi to DIE FOR! 

And all that seed!!! :D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 17, 2009, 07:18:07 AM
A few more shots to encouarge future tourists!
1. Leucogenes grandiceps
2. Celmisia viscosa
3. Hebe tetrasticha
4. Pratia macrodon
5. Craspedia species
6. Stellaria roughii
7. and 8. Notothlaspi rosulatum
9. Alpine garden inspiration
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 17, 2009, 07:22:23 AM
Terrific images, Doug ... many thanks for posting.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 17, 2009, 08:01:05 AM
No worries, wish I had some Ranunculus shots for you!
A couple more shots,
1. The only penwiper left in flower, the hares must have got to it earlier in the season.
2. Celmisia spectabilis, lyallii and hybrids.
3. Raoulia and hybrid x leucogenes grandiceps.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 17, 2009, 08:58:13 AM
I did not look here for a week or so and see there.
Again so many fascinating pictures.
Thank you all for showing.
Doug, the Pratia macrodon seems one to be a really compact plant, or is
this just because growing in high places??
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 17, 2009, 09:58:51 AM
Doug,

Can you supply more information about the Raoulia and Leucogenes hybrid. What species is the Raoulia?

Celmisia lyallii frequently hybridises with Celmisia sessiliflora. It is interesting see the  hybrid with spectabilis (illustrated so well)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on February 17, 2009, 08:01:58 PM
Wow nice pics!
The Raoulia would be mammillaris I guess.
That hybrid is really cool  8)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 17, 2009, 08:49:10 PM
Yes I believe it was Raoulia mammillaris, thank you, I wasn't 100% sure.

As for the Pratia macrodon, it does grow in dense mats up there. The lower basins were covered and the scent was divine. You could smell them from the car park!

The next best aroma was from the Notothlaspi rosulatum which smelt of sweet honey dew.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on February 17, 2009, 09:01:39 PM
Doug,

A great set of photographs, brilliant flowers. Many thanks, really enjoyed viewing them.

"Penwiper", that's a very odd name. How did it come to be so named?

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 17, 2009, 09:05:01 PM
As for the Pratia macrodon, it does grow in dense mats up there. The lower basins were covered and the scent was divine. You could smell them from the car park!
Doug, a plant with so many advantages should be taken in culture!
I only know Pratia angulata, but don't if it has any scent. Never tried.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 18, 2009, 04:50:45 AM
Hi Paddy - Quoted from Lawrie Metcalf's book, Alpine plants of New Zealand.
"The penwiper was named as it resembles an old fashioned, victorian cloth pen-wiper, formerly used to wipe ink from the nib pens used in those days."
There you go!

Hi Lvandelft, I will ask around to see anyone has had luck with Pratia macrodon in the garden, I would love to give it a shot, I'll have to see how it goes from seed.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on February 18, 2009, 05:06:19 AM
Why we're on the hybrids, heres one of my favourates.
Raoulia loganii (Leucogenes leontopodium x Raoulia rubra)
Seems to be doing great in my garden, though it needs rain protection through the winter.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 18, 2009, 08:17:58 AM
Hi Doug,

Pratia macrodon is now Lobelia macrodon. A second species Lobelia glaberrima that is very similar has been described.  They differ in details of the flower that of Lobelia macrodon being larger and more showy. Lobelia glaberrima has a more southern distribution than Lobelia macrodon so you are unlikely to see it in Canterbury.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on February 18, 2009, 08:56:10 AM
Stunning Raoulia loganii Doug !  :o
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 18, 2009, 09:32:35 AM
Here is my posting for tonight some alpines from the Thousand Acres Plateau.

Pimelea gnidia flowers
Pimelea gnidia Shrub in full flower
Helichrysum intermedium (white flowered form) This species is extremely variable with some forms having yellow flowers.
Helichrysum intermedium flowers.
Myosotis species (possibly a local endemic)
Craspedia lanata
Celmisia lateralis
Dolichoglottis lyallii
Hebe epacridea
An Epilobium species. This particular species has the largest flowers of any Epilobium I have ever seen. It is a stunning plant but I do not know its name.
The Epilobium is Epilobium vernicosum. It is allied to Epilobium glabellum but is found on base-rich rock.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 18, 2009, 10:18:30 AM
An Epilobium species. This particular species has the largest flowers of any Epilobium I have ever seen. It is a stunning plant but I do not know its name.

Absolutely beautiful, David ... could almost be Dryas octopetala blooms ...
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 18, 2009, 01:02:57 PM
Indeed, fantastic! Flowers as big as our native weedy Epilobium angustifolium!
Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 18, 2009, 07:02:38 PM
Pratia (Lobelia) macrodon does indeed make a very good cultivated plant, in garden or pot. It is so tight-growing and hugs the ground as closely as a skin. Someone needs to collect seed for the AGS and SRGC seed lists.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 18, 2009, 08:24:26 PM
Pratia (Lobelia) macrodon does indeed make a very good cultivated plant, in garden or pot. It is so tight-growing and hugs the ground as closely as a skin. Someone needs to collect seed for the AGS and SRGC seed lists.
So I spotted a good garden plant Lesley.
Be glad I am not there in the mountains. ;D ;D
I am sure I would have problems resisting taking a cutting or two.
I believe the same with the Epilobium sp. That is a real beauty.
Here in Holland many NZ plants are difficult to keep, but these would have a chance.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on February 23, 2009, 04:24:57 AM
Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

What a lovely little viola.

i agree--interestingly enough, we have one here that is very similar looking!
i presume it to be V renifolia, but not certain--here is a shot from last may, this is a tiny thing, no more than a couple of inches high..
cohan
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on February 23, 2009, 05:20:56 AM
* Saw some fabulous plants ---particularly this wonderful specialized scree plant in flower --Lignocarpa carnosula --it's congested leaves remind me somewhat of deers antlers .
Cheers Dave.

wow wow! seriously cool!
cohan
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on February 23, 2009, 05:42:31 AM
Spot the difference, Pictures of Lignocarpa and Stellaria taken on the same scree at the same time.

another wow! much nicer than the average chickweed around here, even though we do have some pretty flowers and cute fuzzy leaves...lol
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 23, 2009, 07:58:07 AM






Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

What a lovely little viola.

i agree--interestingly enough, we have one here that is very similar looking!
i presume it to be V renifolia, but not certain--here is a shot from last may, this is a tiny thing, no more than a couple of inches high..
cohan

Thank you Cohan!
Pretty little thing - I guess renifolia is right.

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on February 23, 2009, 06:40:59 PM
thanks, gerd--
i will soon start some threads with my local flowers--the locals, are of course, not alpines, but i get the feeling some folks here will still like them; then a couple of short field trips to nearby mountains and southern drylands..
unfortunately, our local flora does not have the exoticism nor tremendous endemism of some of these other great spots! most of our flowers occur over vast areas--that happens when you are in the middle of a wide open continent...lol..still some charmers, though
cohan
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on February 23, 2009, 07:39:06 PM
i will soon start some threads with my local flowers--the locals, are of course, not alpines, but i get the feeling some folks here will still like them; then a couple of short field trips to nearby mountains and southern drylands..

Please, these kind of contributions make this Forum so lively!

unfortunately, our local flora does not have the exoticism nor tremendous endemism of some of these other great spots! most of our flowers occur over vast areas--that happens when you are in the middle of a wide open continent...lol..still some charmers, though

Please consider that exoticism is a term which depends on the place where you live - for instance your native flora might be very exotic for gardeners from the other side of the pond.
I am sure we'll appreciate your following threads!

Gerd
 

 

 


Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on February 24, 2009, 06:35:11 PM
Please consider that exoticism is a term which depends on the place where you live - for instance your native flora might be very exotic for gardeners from the other side of the pond.
I am sure we'll appreciate your following threads!
Gerd
 

hopefully there will be some things 'exotic' to some readers, but many of my locals are the 'circumboreal' types, that will be quite familiar to northern europeans--maybe old favourites though :)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 25, 2009, 08:44:40 AM
Hi everyone,

I found out the name of the Epilobium - it is Epilobium vernicosum and is relatively rare. There is always the chance if it was brought into cultivation it would not become a weed like most Epilobiums do.

Here are some more pictures from the Matiri Range

!,2,3 Celmisia bellidiodes. This species usually grows by streams but here it is growing in crevices in the rock.
4,5  Parahebe linifolia  Again it is growing in rock crevices
6, 7 Gentiana sp This small gentian was growing everywhere but none were actually flowering. Eventually I found one that was flowering.
8  A rare cress Cheesemania latisiliqua now Pachycladon latisiliqua.
9  Schizeilema haastii var cyanopetalum
10 Myosotis sp A small Myosotis that is possibly a local endemic Unfortunately it is not in flowering.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on February 25, 2009, 09:54:23 AM
Some more plants

1 Celmisia monroi This species is very similar to Celmisia semicordata and more or less replaces this species in Nelson and Marlbourough
2 Celmisia petriei It grows in Nelson a well as the southern part of the South Island
3 Celmisia armstrongii This is the same species as Johan posted. It is recognizable by the orange midrib and stiff relative narrow leaves
4 A Celmisia flower. I think it was from Celmisia petriei but they are very similar to those of Celmisia armstrongii
5 Aciphylla colensoi This species has a conspicuous orange midrib. The Celmisia is Celmisia petriei.
6 Ranunculus insignis growing at the entrance of a cave. The cave went down a long way
7 Oxalis magellanica. The leaves of the Oxalis may be seen on the bottom right. There is an Acaena a little Galium and a Celmisia in the picture.
8 Myosotis macrantha The shadow is from a large plastic bag I was using as a diffuser.
9 Wahlenbergia sp  This possibly Wahlenbergia albomarginata.
10 Pratia angulata This a very common widespread plant and grows very well in a garden. It is easier to grow than Pratia (Lobelia ) macrodon which is solely an alpine species.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on February 25, 2009, 10:18:04 AM
Many thanks yet again, David.
Did that little Schizeilema haastii var cyanopetalum used to be called something else ... it looks very familiar?
Super images as usual.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on February 25, 2009, 02:10:11 PM
I was enjoying David's latest pictures very much....until I came to Oxalis magellanica...... I'm faint with horror..... we spend too many hours here trying to eradicate that ghastly weed for me to be able to look at a photo of that, even growing happily in the wild, without a shudder  :'(  That oxalis is one little plant with a HUGE capacity to be a ruddy pest.   I suspect it might even survive, with the cockroaches, Armageddon   :o
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on February 25, 2009, 03:38:17 PM
You never stop to surprise me David!
This time, seeing Pratia angulata growing like this, I would never take it in culture.
I mean comparing to Doug's P. macrodon last week.
Thanks for showing.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on February 25, 2009, 07:29:54 PM
A note for Dave T and David L - there are some Forumists interested in seed of Pentachondra pumila (see that thread). I haven't been to the hills this summer at all but if either of you could collect some fruits I would be happy to clean them and send them along, if you didn't want to bother. It would be a small repayment for the great seed generosity shown to me.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Cephalotus on February 28, 2009, 11:29:49 PM
That was really a terrific trip to NZ, the one I cannot afford to make real for today. My blood pleasure increased wile watching all those magnificent plants and places. I only can wish, that one day I will be allowed to see a bit of that heaven in reality. Thanks for sharing the photos.

Best wishes,
Krzysztof Ciesielski
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 05, 2009, 09:11:29 AM
Hi everyone,

Time I finished this posting - I spent last weekend out in the field with trips to the Garvies and Mt Bee in Northern Southland.

Maggi, I am sorry I caused you pain by showing the picture of Oxalis magellanica. IT does not seem to be a great problem here as there is a double variety that is available from time to time but like many other Southern Hemisphere plants it must thrive in Aberdeen.

Cliff, Schizeilema haastii var cyanopetalum has not had a recent name change. It is a bit like a Hydrocotyle and may remind you of that.

First pictures (1-5) are general shots taken from the head of Larrrikin Creek. The scenery is rather spectacular with the creek dropping away into a canyon flanked by huge limestone bluffs.

Picture 6 is looking down on the Larrikin creek hut through an opening in the forest. There is a large clump of Dracophyllum traversii in the foreground. The smaller shrub in front of this is another Dracophyllum, Dracophyllum longifolium.

Picture 7 shows the flowers of Phormium cookianum.

Picture 8 shows a damsel fly entrapped by Drosera arcturi.

Picture 9 shows a large dragon fly. These insects were plentiful but were not easy to photograph.

Picture 10 shows a small copper butterfly of the genus Lycaena. There are several undescribed specie of these butterflies so I would not presume to identify to to species level.
The host plant for these butterflies is Muehlenbeckia; In this instance it would be the little creeping species Muehlenbeckia axillaris. The adult is feeding on the flowers of Hebe topiaria.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on March 05, 2009, 12:15:37 PM
A breathtaking finish - really enjoyed all your Field trips!

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 07, 2009, 10:49:17 AM
Hi Gerd,

Pleased you enjoyed the postings; I had a rather busy summer. I still have not posted the trip I did with Dave Toole to the Remarkables in early January nor the trip across the Heaphy Track in North -west Nelson later in the month.

Last weekend I went to Northern Southland to the Garvie Mountains and to Mt Bee. While I was in the Garvies Dave was on Mt Bee so I missed him by a day. I bought myself a new carbon fibre tripod so I took it for a walk. Whether the results justify carrying the thing around I will leave for other forumists to judge.

1 We camped at 1500 metres beside this little tarn.
2 Camp on Mt Tennyson - there is a 4WD track to the top
3 The Hector Range is separated from the Garvie Mountains by the Nevis Valley.
4 This view is looking approx north east down the Nevis valley towards the Remarkables which are in the cloud.
5 View across the head of the Dome Burn into the heart of the Garvie Mountains.
6, 7, 8 Views of the extensive wetlands at the head of the Dome Burn.
9 Rock bluffs below the summit of Mt Tennyson.
10 A view looking back to Mt Tennyson from a ridge on the other side of the Dome Burn. Mt Tennyson is the ridge on the right of the picture with the long flat summit. The hill on the left is East Dome. The extensive wetlands can be seen on the shelf above the creek.

I will post some plant pictures next time. There were some spectacular Celmisias growing here
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Gerdk on March 07, 2009, 06:48:55 PM
David,
What a landscape! Thanks a lot for this wonderful encore!

Gerd
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on March 07, 2009, 07:06:35 PM
David,

Simply brilliant. Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on March 07, 2009, 09:54:23 PM
David,
just felt 10.000 years back seeing your pictures from the wild.
And saw in my power of imagination a troup of mammoths meekly grazing... ::) :D
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 08, 2009, 12:54:08 AM
I don't think we ever had mammoths Armin and would a mammoth be meek anyway? :)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 08, 2009, 08:26:12 AM
Thanks everyone for the kind comments.

Armin,
Here is a story for you that may make up for the absence of mammoths. Once the Nevis River flowed south into the Nokomai ( which in turn flows into the Mataura). It now flows north into the Kawarau ( which flows into the Clutha). The little galaxid fish that live in the Nevis River today are more closely related to the ones in the Nokomai and are not related to the ones that live in the nearby creeks flowing into the Kawarau River. These mountains have been rising due to tectonic uplift causing the rivers to change direction and cut new gorges.

Although it is late in the season there are still a lot of plants in flower especially on the higher south -facing sites. The gentians wre in full flower but they are the last alpines to flower anyway.

1 Aciphylla hectori
2 Celmisia semicordata ssp aurigans showing the golden tomentum that is characteristic of this form.
3. Gentiana bellidifolia - this plant has pale stems
4. Gentiana bellidifolia - this plant has dark stems
5, 6  Gnaphalium mackayi
7.  A little Myosotis. Every mountain in this part of the world seems to have its own undescribed species of Myosotis.
8. Neopaxia australasica
9  Raoulia subulata This is an alpine species found in snowbanks.
10 Scleranthus uniflorus with a small plant of Leptinella pectinata  growing in the cushion.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 08, 2009, 09:15:13 AM
Here are some daisies

1 Brachyglottis revolutus
2. Celmisia semicordata ssp aurigans en masse.
3. Late flowering plant of Celmisia semicordata
4. Foliage variants of Celmisia semicordata.  On the left is a grey-geen form, centre and right is typical ssp aurigans. There are three plants with silvery foliage on the right at the rear of the clump. The small plants in the foreground are Celmisia densiflora.
5. Celmisia verbascifolia. This form has a purple midrib and was formerly known as Celmisia petiolata. This is perhaps the eastern most part of its range.
6. Celmisia verbascifolia and a mystery Celmisa. If this is not Celmisia verbascifolia then what is it?
7. The fabulous woolly mystery Celmisia close up.
8. Celmisia haastii a late snowbank species.
9. Celmisa glandulosa  A small species usually found in bogs. I have tried to grow this one but without success,
10. Celmisia alpina  Perhaps the smallest species ; confined to bogs
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on March 08, 2009, 10:30:21 AM
Gee Mr Lyttle You do get about . ::).

Wonderful Daisy pics.

Particularly the 2nd shot of Celmisia semicordata ssp aurigans enmass.The absence of most of the larger type tussock grasses show the plants off very well.

Celmisia grandulosa has clumped up well for me in a trough where it receives about 2 hours of sun mid summer---Unfortunately i don't find the foliage all that attractive and it doesn't flower consistently from one year to another.

Might have to cross the valley when i'm next up that way in a couple of weeks and have a stroll around Mt Tennyson. Looks a very interesting area David.

Cheers Dave
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on March 08, 2009, 03:22:26 PM
Oh, David, I'm enjoying those Celmisia pix! That  mystery furry number is very smart .
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on March 08, 2009, 07:01:04 PM
Couldn't disagree on the celmesias, Maggi, and that mystery plant is outstanding; however, it is the aciphyllas which I most admire and desire. Perhaps, they reflect my personality best.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 08, 2009, 07:27:09 PM
Is the furry one a hybrid David? It is VERY handsome. The "en masse" group with landscape background is a very special picture.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on March 08, 2009, 08:22:20 PM
Hi David,
wow you do get about!
I have seen that mystery Celmisia plant in many places and I thought about its identity for a long time. My conclusion is that maybe its a hybrid or a random "freak" that comes out every so often. I figured this out from seed I have sown and also seed I sold to Lester Davey from Matai Nurseries. We both sow large amounts of seed of Celmisia semicordata and we both noticed that a small percentage of the large species (such as semicordata) come out all furry. They are superb plants. I havent figured out yet what happens to the next generation of seed weather its viable or breeds true. I dont really know what causes the furryness but its not a new species.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on March 08, 2009, 08:28:44 PM
I don't think we ever had mammoths Armin and would a mammoth be meek anyway? :)

Hi Lesley,
I don't know at all if there were meek mammoths  :-\
But please allow me to keep my fantasy ;D :-*
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on March 08, 2009, 08:38:00 PM
Thanks everyone for the kind comments.

Armin,
Here is a story for you that may make up for the absence of mammoths. Once the Nevis River flowed south into the Nokomai ( which in turn flows into the Mataura). It now flows north into the Kawarau ( which flows into the Clutha). The little galaxid fish that live in the Nevis River today are more closely related to the ones in the Nokomai and are not related to the ones that live in the nearby creeks flowing into the Kawarau River. These mountains have been rising due to tectonic uplift causing the rivers to change direction and cut new gorges.


David,
very interesting story. Thanks.
I also would like to come to NZ for trout fly-fishing in one of the phantastic wild rivers and lakes. ;)
Your pictures are excellent.
 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on March 08, 2009, 08:40:22 PM
David,
very interesting story. Thanks.
I also would like to come to NZ for trout fly-fishing in one of the phantastic wild rivers and lakes. ;)
Your pictures are excellent.
 


Armin, our WebMaster Fred Admin is expected back in Scotland soon after his trip to New Zealand to go fishing...... I hope he will be telling us how he enjoyed himself... ::)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on March 08, 2009, 09:04:11 PM
Just To show that you dont need to be called David to enjoy the mountains of NZ here are some selected highlights of my trip last week.

I visited some low hills near Mossburn where Celmisia spedenii grows on ultramafic soils amounst manuka scrub. the first photo shows spedenii growing normally out in the open The secound photo shows it growing under shade by manuka its looks much more attractive like this almost like a hawaian silversword. There is also variation in colour from dark grey almost black leaves to very silver coloured leaves.
The 3rd photo is of a nice chocalate coloued myosotis not sure if it has a name but hokonui alpines sold it incorectaly named chessmanii for years.

I also visited Leaning Rock on the Dunsten Range it was a fun trip as Steve N came with me (he may not want his name popping up in google searches)
 This area is private land so you need to ask the landowner.
The 4 th photo shows Myosotis albosericea an extremly local species with yellow flowers.
The 5th photo shows Celmisia sessilflora which was still flowering in the shade of leaning rock
The 6th photo shows Steves car for scale against Leaning rock
The 7th photo shows the landscape on the otherside of leaning rock Im sure heards of Moa (if not mammoths) marched across these areas.
The last photo shows the landscape on the river side of leaning rock looking towards Clyde damn in the distance.




Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on March 08, 2009, 09:41:52 PM
Here are some more photos of last weeks trip to the hills
sorry for the lack of pretty flowers but it is late in the season and Im mainly interested in foliage any ways.

I also visited the area next to the DoC reserve on the Pisa Range. Again you need permission to cross farmers land.
The first photo is of Raoulia species L This has a name these days but I havent got around to finding out what it is yet. Its quite a nice thing looking like a missing link between mat forming Raoulia and the vegetable sheep. It grows on the Remarkables too in very short vegetation of cushion and fell field type places.
2nd photo : Raoulia youngii growing in late snow banks, some plants were still flowering, as Feb. was not very summery this year. In Queenstown they had 5 days of no sunshine hours at all.
Myosotis cheesmanii grows around rocks.  2 metres away from the rock this plant was growing  there were no cheesmanii what so ever. Mysotis pulvinaris grows in the hummocks near by and also in late snow banks, photo number 4 shows a hybrid between the two.
Photo 5 shows a nice mosaic of Kellaria croizatii Abrotenella inconspicua and Phyllachne colensoii. Photo 6 is a different view of the same sought of thing.
Photo 7 is of Raoulia apicenigra and Raoulia subsericea
Photo 8 is just a landscape shot showing where you have to walk to see the cool plants.
Photo 9 is just a shot of why Im always glad to get back from the mountains recently.





Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 08, 2009, 10:12:47 PM
I still have the little brown Myosotis with cheesemannii, on the label so I'd like to know what it really is. A lovely shot of your littler lady Ross. 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on March 09, 2009, 01:26:07 AM
Quote----'"I dont really know what causes the furryness but its not a new species. "
 

Not yet Ross but give it a while and i'm sure some 'splitter' will come along and give it a name..... ;)

The following is a close up shot i took of a plant last month showing just how dense the tomentum can be and since there is a world wide movement against the use of animal fur for womens --(... and okay mens), clothing i foresee requests coming from far a field ,(excuse the pun), to collect this fitting,(excuse 2nd pun), alternative  ::) .

Cheers dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 09, 2009, 09:57:49 AM
Gee Mr Lyttle You do get about .

Dave,

You dont do too badly yourself ! As an aside the Maori used Celmisia fur to make little baskets so you would be in real trouble if you started distributing such a culturally important item.

Maggi,
I suspect the furry Celmisia is a hybrid between Celmisia semicordata and Celmisia verbascifolia as I have only observed it be where these two species are found together. As you can see from my photos Celmisia verbascifolia does not have any tomentum on the upper surface of its leaves and Celmisia semicordata has only a thin pellicle. Where the furry tomentum comes from is a mystery. The plant has a soft floppy leaf like Celmisia verbascifolia ;the leaf of Celmisia semicordata is relatively stiff.  Ross' s comments support this view of its origin.

Lesley,
The little Myosotis sold by Hokonui is not formally named. If you would like to describe and formally name it heres your chance. In the meantime I am going to use the tag name Myosotis ' Mt Hamilton ' as that was where the Hokonui plants originated.

Ross,
I am interested in your two species of Raoulia. I do not think I have seen Raoulia species L. I have seen a very small unamed species of Raoulia from the Pisa Range.
I think what you are calling Raoulia apicenigra is not that but another widespread species found in North Otago. I have seen it on the Dunstan Range and the Ohau Range.
The taxonomy of Raoulia is not up to date.

Paddy,
I have some more pictures of Aciphylla to come including the absolutely stunning Aciphylla aff horrida ' Lomondi '

Here is tonights posting

1 Aciphylla pinnatifida male
2,3 Aciphylla pinnatifida female. The Garvies are at the eastern limit of this species range.
4 staying with the Apiaceae Anisotome lanuginosa
5 and 6 The so called Gentiana amabilis; This is considered to be a dwarf form of Gentiana bellidifolia adapted to bogs. It has very dark foliage.
7 Chionohebe densifolia  A rather robust compact form of this variable species.
8 The little fern Blechnum penna marina filling up a crevice in a rock. This species extends from sea level to the alpine zone.
9. The orchid  Prasophyllum colensoi This is another very common widespread species,
10 Leucogenes grandiceps This plant is very photogenic and I cannot resist taking more pictures whenever I find a nice specimen


Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 09, 2009, 08:20:43 PM
Another wonderful collection David. The second pic of Gent. amabilis should keep the northerners as happy as some of their crocus fields. ;D No doubt there will be a good native offering on the local seedlist this year? :)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on March 09, 2009, 09:01:15 PM
Nice Photos David.
Im basing the name apicenigra on the black petals of the florets. The photo of Raoulia L is a very small plant and its what Steve Newall calls Raoulia species L Iv seen it on the Remarkables too they look the same on both mountains, so dont try giving them two different names! I think Dr Lyttle you are one the splitters. Iv seen apicenigra throughout the South island and Id have to say its pretty uniform.
The unnammed Myostis you showed a couple of pages back looks to me like M pygmea.
 I read recently that leucogenies grandiceps could be split into 2 or 3 different species based on genetic analysis but whats the point? Its better to realise that some locations have nice forms that are compact almost cushion like and some are more straggly and less attractive in cultivation. Discussions like this are why I go to the mountains by myself. The mountains to me are serene almost sacred places where academic one-upman ship has no place.

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 10, 2009, 09:54:54 AM
Ross,

I am very reluctant to give any number of Raoulias names as there appears to be a proliferation of tag named species up to L and perhaps beyond that. There have been a number of  publications on what is termed the Raoulia alliance but the core genus has not yet been revised so there is nothing to hang a name on. At present there are four species of Leucogenes recognised, L . grandiceps , L. leontopodium L. negelecta and L.tarahaoa, Genetic analysis shows the genus is not monophyletic and is considerably more complex than the accepted species designations would indicate. Current taxonomy is just a reflection of our understanding of the relationships amongst groups of plants. Genetic analysis reveals that these relationships are often more complicated than relationships based on morphological characters alone. So trying to understand these relationships does not necessarily make me a splitter. My own view is that a good species is something one can recognise in the field by a set of distinctive morphlogical and ecological characteristics.

Some more photos for tonight

1 A little tarn in the peat with ferns growing on the bank.
2 A natural rock garden.
3 Mats of Celmisia hectori growing over rocks by a small creek.
4. Acaena saccaticupula
5 A small Aciphylla.
6 Leptinella goyenii
7 Leptinella squalida. This species has a strong honey scent. Dave Toole made this observation when he had his nose down centimetres away from the plant taking pictures.
8 Raoulia hectori This is the most common cushion field species.
9. A cushion of Scleranthus uniflorus.
10 Close up of the foliage and fruit of Scleranthus uniflorus
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on March 10, 2009, 10:37:33 AM
David,

A great set of photographs and I look forward to the aciphyllas.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on March 10, 2009, 11:45:42 AM
David, you haven't struck me as a splitter, for sure  :)

That pic of Acaena saccaticupula is great! What an extraordinary colour! Quite tall stems too...... such an education to see these plants.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Brian Ellis on March 10, 2009, 01:30:19 PM
Some wonderful pictures David, thank you so much for posting them, I am one of those that will never get to see these things in the wild, I wish I had taken advantage when I could.

I agree with Maggi, the Acaena saccaticupula is superb, I could give that house room!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lvandelft on March 10, 2009, 04:31:34 PM
Thank you for these super pictures David.
I remember you showed Acaena saccaticupula last year in a pot in your garden
without flowers... nothing special at first look, but now in flower....extraordinary!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 10, 2009, 07:23:34 PM

That pic of Acaena saccaticupula is great! What an extraordinary colour! Quite tall stems too...... such an education to see these plants.

It sure is a stunner but try saying that name 3 times, fast, when your mouth is full of cornflakes! ;D



Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Ross Graham on March 10, 2009, 08:20:11 PM
David,
Quote
My own view is that a good species is something one can recognise in the field by a set of distinctive morphlogical and ecological characteristics.

I agree with that and that is how I hang names on anything I also think that all we can do is name things on the current understanding of which plant is which in any given genus and my current understanding is that R apicenigra has black petals (hence nigra) and that it has a certain apparence in general and grows in a certain environment.
Also I tend to name things by what other people have said they are called such as Steve Newall. He has talked to the experts who have studied the Genus and he has collected seed and specimans for them. I also tend to think you need a good reason to contradict someone.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on March 10, 2009, 08:21:52 PM

That pic of Acaena saccaticupula is great! What an extraordinary colour! Quite tall stems too...... such an education to see these plants.

It sure is a stunner but try saying that name 3 times, fast, when your mouth is full of cornflakes! ;D

I'd call it "Sufferin' Soccatash" ...... after Tom in Tom and Jerry cartoon.... was it Tom who said that...... no, it was Sylvester from Sylvester and Tweety Pie!  ;D ;)

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 13, 2009, 10:16:02 AM
Hi everyone,

I am pleased you all liked the Acaena; it is not an easy plant to photograph. I chose a plant that had a well defined edge growing partially out over the stone used, a low angle for the shot with the greatest depth of field my lens would give me.

It is quite a spectacular plant with the red seed head and coloured foliage but like all Acaenas with spines on the seeds not particularly garden friendly. I have an Acaena novae-zelandiae growing up over a netting fence - the seed heads are spectacular as the mature and colour but when they ripen they fragment and stick to your clothing. Acaena inermis ( the one without spines) is a much more tractable species for the garden.

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on March 13, 2009, 10:58:34 AM
Another set of wonderful pix David.
As everybody else I'm mesmerized by the Acaena !  What an extraordinary plant !  :o
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 14, 2009, 09:08:09 AM
Here are the last pictures from the Garvie Mountains.

We headed down into the Dome Burn and up a big hill. On the other side of this ridge was. The main ridge another wetland complex this time draining into Roaring Lion Creek which flows north in to the Nevis River. The skyline ridge is the main and highest part of the Garvie Mountains. The headwaters of Roaring Lion Creek probably also flowed south at one stage but now flow north.

Picture 1 is the headwaters of Roaring Lion Creek; the drainage is to the left of the photo.

Picture 2 is a similar view with Celmisia semicordata var aurigans in the foreground.

Picture 3 is looking down the Dome Burn, Th Dome Burn drops steeply into a fairly impressive gorge.

Picture 4 is the little turf-like Astelia , Astelia linearis. It forms huge patches in these bogs.

Picture 5 is Euphrasia dyeri. A proportion of the plants have mauve flowers.

Picture 6 is Gentiana amabilis or bellidifolia if you wish.

Picture 7 is Abrotanella inconspicua. I decided it was this species and not Abrotanella caespitosa because the inflorescence is not scapose. ( if anyone wishes to dispute this).

Picture 8 is Craspedia lanata. The different species of Craspedia differ in the amount of tomentum on their leaves going from Craspedia uniflora which has virtually no hairs. Craspedia lanata is somewhat hairy and Craspedia incana is quite woolly. Of course all species occupy a continuum from no hairs to very hairy.

Picture 9 is a little pool flanked by Aciphylla pinnatifida.

Picture 10 is a tarn one amongst many

Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on March 14, 2009, 09:20:01 AM
Ah David --the difference a week makes --i ventured up to Mt Tennyson this morning to be greeted by heavy snow drifts on the track which meant i had to park my bike and leg it the last 150 metres to the crest of the ridge where even deeper snow lay.So very little botanising --i'll have to rely on your postings.

Cheers dave. 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 14, 2009, 09:38:41 AM
Continuing,

Aoraria senex female; This moth has a winged male that can fly very well. The female which you can see here emerges, mates and crawls along the ground laying eggs as this one was doing when I found her.

The world renowned (in Aberdeen) Nevis Hilton. The stove has been removed (which saves the bunks being broken up and burnt and also decreases the likelihood of the place being burnt down).

Dave,

You seem to attract the snow!  You would have got a nice view into the heart of the Garvies. Spent today botanising on the cliffs at Cape Saunders on the Peninsula. The day here was overcast but calm which is a change from the weather we have been having for the past week (the same that delivered the snow you encountered).
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Lesley Cox on March 14, 2009, 09:43:20 PM
Aoraria senex female; This moth has a winged male that can fly very well. The female which you can see here emerges, mates and crawls along the ground laying eggs as this one was doing when I found her.

What a life, for another poor, b....dy woman! some confined to the kitchen, others to bedroom and maternity ward, :'( while HE goes gallivanting. >:(
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Cephalotus on March 22, 2009, 11:34:14 PM
David, that Gentiana amabilis is outstanding! Something incredible. What I have to do to get some seeds of that one? It really should be cultivated in Europe. It looks amazing!

Kind regards,
Chris
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on March 23, 2009, 09:08:32 AM
This weekend I ventured up too Avalanche Peak in the Arthur's Pass. Unfortunately I was with two multi sport mountain runners who seemed to skip the near vertical climb and today I am in agony. Managed to snap off a few photos though, need help with some of the identities.
1. First of many beautiful waterfalls.
2. Dracophyllum traversii.
3. and 4. Haastia recurva ?
5. Mt Rolleston and the Crow glacier.
6. Hebe sp.
7. Faces covered in Ranunculus lyallii.
8. Dracophyllum traversii.
9. The Punch Bowl.
10. Celmisia semicordata ?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: cohan on March 23, 2009, 05:37:51 PM
I was with two multi sport mountain runners 

wow! sounds very intense!
glad you survived to send the photos! ;)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 24, 2009, 08:00:42 AM
Hi Doug,

Some nice plants there- I have climbed Mt Avalanche only in winter so all I have seen above treeline there is snow.

The Haastia is Haastia sinclairii.

The Hebe is most likely Hebe lycopodioides. The stems should be distinctly square in cross section. The scale leaves have a projecting pointed tip.

the Celmisia is Celmisia semicordata.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on March 24, 2009, 08:28:41 AM
No pool at the Nevis Hilton then?  ;D   Presumably they do room service?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on March 24, 2009, 08:37:21 AM
Thank you very much David for the corrections, I still haven't managed to get a copy of NZ Alpine plants (Mark and Adams If any one out there has a 1980s copy for sale?)
To get up there in winter must have been a feat, I will be revisiting next summer for the flowering of the Ranunculus lyallii, it must be an incredible sight with the whole herbfield covered in it.
Haastia sinclairii, what a stunning plant, has anyone had luck with it in cultivation?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 24, 2009, 10:14:47 AM
No pool at the Nevis Hilton then?  ;D   Presumably they do room service?


The roof keeps out the rain. What more do you want? :)

Tonights posting is from Mt Bee. Mt Bee is on the other side of the valley. The accomodation there can be described as resort standard - One hut with log burner and sink, two bunkrooms, a woodshed and a detached moulded fibreglass facility.

This is the most accessible site to see Celmisia philocremna. It grows on several rock outcrops at the end of a 4WD road that is now in fairly poor state of repair so much so that I was not prepared to drive it. For Dave Toole and his motorbike this is not a problem but then if you walk you see more plants.

1 A rock outcrop with Celmisia philocremna and Raoulia buchananii growing on it.
2 View across valley from Celmisia philocremna site.
3 Celmisia philocremna
4 Celmisia philocremna flowers; the main flowering was past and this was the best picture I was able to get.
5 Celmisia philocremna plant on rock crag ( the specific epithet philocremna = crag-loving)
6 More Celmisia philocremna plants growing happily on a vertical rock face. The site was very cold and windy on the day. The plant apparently like a vigorous air ciculation around it.
7 Raoulia buchananii growing on rock
8 A rather nice Leucogenes grandiceps
9 Leucogenes grandiceps flowers. I take too many picture of this plant but I keep finding specimens that all look stunning.
10 Celmisia semicordata var stricta. The predominant form here is grey/white unlike var aurigans which predominats on the Garvie Mountains across the valley to the east
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: ranunculus on March 24, 2009, 10:32:08 AM
Superb C. semicordata, David - and how wonderful to see such a rarity as C. philocremna in the wild.  I can't imagine what contortions you had to go through to get image number five - were you roped on?  Magnificent post, many thanks!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Luc Gilgemyn on March 24, 2009, 01:21:40 PM
Awesome Dave !!!!  :o :o
Thanks a million for sharing !
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: hadacekf on March 24, 2009, 05:27:38 PM
Magnificent mountains and fabulous flowers. Many thanks!
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Armin on March 24, 2009, 08:55:59 PM
David,
I'm enjoying everything. Fascinating. 8)
Thank you.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Paddy Tobin on March 24, 2009, 09:53:50 PM
Dave, as ever, fabulous reports and photographs. Enjoying them greatly.

Paddy
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 25, 2009, 10:50:23 AM
Hi everyone,

Thank you all for your kind comments. Dave Toole initially showed me the location of Celmisia philocremna plants. The Eyre Mountains are home to a number of other endemic species including Ranunculus scrithalis, Ranunculus piliferus, Celmisia thomsonii and Aciphylla spedenii that I have yet to see. Finding them would involve some fairly hard travelling so next year perhaps. Weather is also a factor.

Cliff,

I was not roped on for the Celmisia philocremna picture to which you allude. The actual plant is visible in the first picture of the series and can be approached up the steep grassy slope on the right. I have re-posted the picture and marked the approximate camera position with an X. I used a tripod and everything including myself was fairly precariously balanced above the drop. The picture of Pascale eating her lunch and looking out over the valley was taken up in the little saddle above the crag; there a second
crag that rises steeply above the saddle with more plants growing on it. I crossed through the saddle and traversed round the bottom of the lower outcrop photographing plants as I went. The country is quite steep not easy to move round in. To reach the site we traversed across some fairly rough screes. There were some interesting plants growing on them but these southern screes do not have as many specialised plants as are found on the Canterbury screes further north. The local vegetable sheep is Raoulia buchananii which is confined to the southern part of the SoUth Island. Like most vegetable sheep it prefers to be anchored on rock outcrops rather than growing in a mobile scree.

2 Raoulia buchananii cushion
3 Raoulia buchananii with flowers, The flowers are red.
4 Colony of Raoulia buchananii
5 Hybrid between Raoulia buchananii and Leucogenes grandiceps growing in Raoulia cushion. (or that is what I think it is - it is a bigeneric hybrid) Such hybrids have been recorded between Leucogenes and  number of Raoulia species.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on March 30, 2009, 11:30:44 AM
Some more pictures from Mt Bee

1 A little plant of Helichrysum filicaule growing in a crevice in a rock. This species is inconspicuous at the best of times and usually grows amongst grass so is not particularly photogenic.
2. Stellaria roughii. It does not seem to form the rounded clumps here as it does in Canterbury. There are a few stems here and there in the scree but I found nothing bigger than this plant.
3. Hebe propinqua  If growing under favourable conditions unchecked it form a nice rounded shrub as do many other Hebes
4. Hebe propinqua flowering branches.
5, 6 Gentiana montana ( that is what I have called it) It may be Gentiana bellidifolia but it looks a bit different from the forms of this species that I am familiar with.
7 A purple foliaged form of the above
8 Aciphylla aff horrida 'lomondi'  This species has not been formally named and is a most stunning architectural plant.The key says that Aciphylla horrida has stipules. Following a rather dangerous maneuver I managed to extract a leaf from one plant and found it did not have stipules. Later I found a plant with leaves that had stipules. Aciphyllas do not appear to have read the Flora of NewZealand. Only a few plants of this species flowered this year.
9 The same species with an inflorescence.
10 Aciphylla glaucescens. This species has finely-divided glaucous-blue foliage. In contrast to the previous species nearly all of the plants of  Aciphylla glaucescens had flowered.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Eric Locke on April 03, 2009, 11:05:38 PM

Looking forward to my visit soon   :)
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: Maggi Young on April 04, 2009, 11:38:16 PM

Looking forward to my visit soon   :)
"Soon", Eric? You're not off down there for their winter ,are you?  :P
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on April 18, 2009, 10:54:36 AM
Quote

"Dave,
We happen to know what you are doing with chains and padlocks in the wild, but newcomers to the forum MIGHT be slightly suspicious (especially when you mention that your solo trips are beginning to worry your lovely wife ...  )?    Shocked Shocked Shocked Grin"
« Last Edit: April 17, 2009, 10:06:53 PM by ranunculus »

End of quote.

Not to worry Cliff--i was unable to locate the said items while up country today so it looks like a new set of security gear for the bike.

As expected there was very little still flowering and anything in seed ,(other than the Gentians), was badly infested with insects.

A couple of interesting finds however ,living in amongst the tussock vegetation....

The shell of a giant NZ snail--Powelliphanta spedenii ssp spedenii---a nocturnal carnivore.

2nd pic is of a beetle that had a wonderful colouring to it's body---green on black.It looked to have a good set of pincers .......


Cheers Dave.



 
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on April 24, 2009, 08:09:43 AM
After reading David's post on Sawcut gorge some while back, I went in this weekend to explore this incredible limestone creation. Not a lot flowering now but I could not believe the number of Pachystegia insignis plants in one area, must be incredible in the summer.
From here we went over to lake Brunner, here's a few local scenery shots.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: t00lie on April 24, 2009, 09:34:53 AM
Nice shots Doug especially the Kea .

I see it's been caught at some stage and been banded.

Cheers dave.
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on April 24, 2009, 10:18:39 AM
Hi Doug,

Quite a little tour you have taken us on. I am not quite sure how you got from the Waima Valley to Lake Brunner and then Castle Hill Basin. Sawcut Gorge is really impressive; it is difficult to do justice to the area with only photographs.

Did you see the Wahlenbergia mathewsii in the Gorge?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: kiwi on April 24, 2009, 10:48:41 AM
Yes it was a bit of a zig zag journey, through the Lewis and back through the Arthurs pass.
I did get this photo of what I think is Wahlenbergia, but it was high up the bank and my zoom has not done it justice. Is this W. mathewsii?
Title: Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
Post by: David Lyttle on April 24, 2009, 11:43:01 AM
Yes- that is Wahlenbergia mathewsii. The distribution is from the Waima to the Clarence Valley on limestone.