Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Flowers and Foliage Now => Topic started by: johnw on December 05, 2010, 04:29:29 PM

Title: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: johnw on December 05, 2010, 04:29:29 PM
A few shots from today as I thought forumist might like to see something other than white:

A bit of autumn colour on azalea 'Scotian Breeze', Shortia uniflora in sun, S. uniflora in shade and Diapensia lapponica.

johnw
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: fleurbleue on December 05, 2010, 04:39:46 PM
Amazing foliages John  ::)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: WimB on December 05, 2010, 05:08:06 PM
Beautiful red coloured leaves, John.

Do you grow your Shortia's in pure peat or in a leafy soil?
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: angie on December 05, 2010, 05:34:38 PM
I had never seen Shortia's before until I went to Maureen Wilson garden, Maureen had some beauties you  would have thought someone had polished the leaves they were so glossy. Maureen kindly gave me some so I shall look for a nice place to plant in the spring.

Angie :)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: johnw on December 05, 2010, 07:03:06 PM
Beautiful red coloured leaves, John.

Do you grow your Shortia's in pure peat or in a leafy soil?

Wim - The soil is heavily laced with peat and well-rotted bark, in other words it is very loose.  I mulch with ground oak leaves and pine bark mulch as well.  In the spring I top dress with some well-rotted cow manure.  They seem to grow most happily at the edge of a peat wall into which I bet they send their roots.

johnw
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: WimB on December 05, 2010, 08:16:35 PM
Beautiful red coloured leaves, John.

Do you grow your Shortia's in pure peat or in a leafy soil?

Wim - The soil is heavily laced with peat and well-rotted bark, in other words it is very loose.  I mulch with ground oak leaves and pine bark mulch as well.  In the spring I top dress with some well-rotted cow manure.  They seem to grow most happily at the edge of a peat wall into which I bet they send their roots.

johnw

Thanks John,

I have quite some seedlings I have to plant outside next year and I was wondering if I should try to grow them in something else than pure peat.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: johnw on December 05, 2010, 08:50:15 PM
Beautiful red coloured leaves, John.

Do you grow your Shortia's in pure peat or in a leafy soil?

Wim - The soil is heavily laced with peat and well-rotted bark, in other words it is very loose.  I mulch with ground oak leaves and pine bark mulch as well.  In the spring I top dress with some well-rotted cow manure.  They seem to grow most happily at the edge of a peat wall into which I bet they send their roots.

johnw

Thanks John,

I have quite some seedlings I have to plant outside next year and I was wondering if I should try to grow them in something else than pure peat.

I should have mentioned that I also used rotten wood from a pine tree in the soil. They love it.  If you can find an old fallen pine in the woods that is disintegrating you'll be in luck.

johnw
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: johnw on December 06, 2010, 01:32:38 AM
One last autumn shot of Helleborus argutifolius which is always showy in winter when not buried in snow.  The centre compact one has been there for 25 years which seems awfully aged for this species (??); H. foetidus sticks around for a fifth that at best.  I wonder if anyone has lifted and divided these two species?

+8c at 21:40 AST and the weatherman has decided it's time for us to have a good storm. So we will have not 30mm of rain, but closer to 75-80mm (this after 30mm yesterday) and 100km/hr winds. We actually saw the sun for a few hours today.  Vinca minor in flower at a friend's this afternoon!

johnw  
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Natalia on December 10, 2010, 05:15:06 PM
Forest near my garden. Yaroslavl region.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Paddy Tobin on December 10, 2010, 06:12:42 PM
A lovely scene, Natalia.

Paddy
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: cohan on December 10, 2010, 06:53:36 PM
Forest near my garden. Yaroslavl region.


very nice--looks quite familiar :)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hans A. on December 12, 2010, 11:16:07 PM
Beautyful picture, Natalia!

About 15║C, some plants are flowering: Galanthus elwesii, Iris palaestina, Crocus laevigatus, Narcissus papyraceus and Oxalis lobata -hope last one will have a better behaviour than some of its relatives.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: fermi de Sousa on December 12, 2010, 11:42:00 PM
..... and Oxalis lobata -hope last one will have a better behaviour than some of its relatives.
Hans,
this Oxalis is very well behaved in our garden and has to be divided to get it to spread! If it gets a cold enough winter it will die down and then start to flower again in spring!
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Natalia on December 13, 2010, 04:39:29 PM
Thank you!
cohan, сovered with snow Alberts ate are very similar to our fur-trees :)

Hans A. - Enthusiastically admired your plants!

At us-10S and snow. The first flowers will seem only in March.
 And can and later.... :(

 

 
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on December 13, 2010, 10:37:30 PM
About 15║C, some plants are flowering: Galanthus elwesii, Iris palaestina, Crocus laevigatus, Narcissus papyraceus and Oxalis lobata -hope last one will have a better behaviour than some of its relatives.

I am jealous, Hans, you can enjoy flowering plants and I have to live through the coldest autumn in 100 years! November was 5oC colder than normal. Usually some shrubs and Hellebores are flowering at this time of the year here at the west coast of Norway.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hans A. on December 20, 2010, 03:48:38 PM
Thanks Fermi, Natalia and Trond!
If O. lobata behaves well I will keep it in the garden. ;)
Here two Rosmarinus officinalis - first one the cultivar 'Majorcan Pink' and an own findling grown from a cutting.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on December 20, 2010, 04:29:26 PM
Hans, I grow Rosmarinus as a herb in pots and do not dare to plant them out. But when I look at your pictures they have very cute flowers remarkably like some orchids!
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: pehe on December 21, 2010, 06:15:19 AM
A few flowers from my green house. There is not many flowers now, so I take what I can get!

Narcissus cantabricus foliosus
Narcissus serotinus
Nerine filamentosa
Colchicum cupanii
And some winter flowers

Poul
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Bev Olson on December 21, 2010, 06:45:28 AM
i like this.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on December 21, 2010, 07:55:09 AM
Hello Poul!
Nice plants! Do you use much artificial light in your greenhouse? How do you feed the last two? ;)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maren on December 21, 2010, 10:52:50 AM
Nice piccis, Poul. :)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Natalia on December 21, 2010, 03:58:36 PM
Poul, thanks for the beauty of flowers!  And live and ice! :)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: pehe on December 22, 2010, 06:03:35 AM
Hello Poul!
Nice plants! Do you use much artificial light in your greenhouse? How do you feed the last two? ;)

Hello
Trond,

Until now I had not used any artificial light, but sometimes I use sodium high pressure lamps. As an experiment I have just bought two LED lamps with red and blue light, which should be the best light colours for plants. The last two flowers are almost like weeds, they come by them selves and don't need any fertilizers. They can be tricky, I have never flowered them in the summer ;D

Poul
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: pehe on December 22, 2010, 06:07:41 AM
Thank you Bev, Trond, Maren and Natalia! I wish you and the rest of the forum a Merry  Christmas!

Poul
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Juan Fornes on December 22, 2010, 08:12:54 AM
 -  Lovely Shortias, Johnw!

 - Hans: great pics! My Iris palaestina are now begining to spread their leaves (I have just got them) so it┤s a pleasure to see yours flowering! Wish mine will flower next year too! Your Rosmarinus looks great. Have you tried to eat just the flower? Pick up one, take out the sepals and try it: much softer (mild? excuse my english...) than the leaves. Delicious...

- Pehe: nice pics! Such a late Narcissus serotinus, isn┤t it? Here in the wild is is rarely seen later than October! Lucky you to enjoy it in these cold days, when any colour is so welcome!

Some leaves from my pots:
 A) Cassia nemophila (=Senna artemisoides var. filifolia) in its first flowering season (Planted from seed last year)
 B) Scilla obtusifolia
 C) Lupinus pilosus sprouting
 D) Urginea undulata subsp. caeculi
 
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Juan Fornes on December 22, 2010, 08:28:46 AM
And these are:
a) Lapiedra martinezii just repotted
b) Iris lutescens
c) Green beans of Acokanthera oblongifolia, the Bushman┤s Poisson arrow plant, having flowered this year fro the first time after having being sown from seed about 8 years ago.
d) Acokanthera oblongifolia (this pic was taken in May. Just to show the flower)
e) Urginea maritima and a few Pancratium maritimum
and
f) A curiosity from the wild: viola arborescens, a winter flowering viola
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Paddy Tobin on December 22, 2010, 09:00:42 AM
A wonderful selection of plants, Juan.

Paddy
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Maggi Young on December 22, 2010, 11:11:12 AM
I'm interested to see the flowers of the Acokanthera oblongifolia.... are they sweetly scented? 
Easy to see why some  (now dead) people have mistaken the fruits for olives, isn't it.  :-X :'(
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Juan Fornes on December 22, 2010, 11:22:10 AM
Thank you Paddy!

Yes, Maggy: they are very sweetly scented. The resemblance to olive fruits gets even greater when they ripe, as both get a final purple-black colour. I collected the seeds from a garden in Canary Islands and fortunately I┤ve been rewarded this year....
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Hoy on December 22, 2010, 07:30:13 PM
You have a lot of special and interesting plants, Juan! The Viola arborescens, is it really a shrub?
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Juan Fornes on December 22, 2010, 09:12:54 PM
Yes Hoy, it is really a shrub. Though often it is a very small one, it can reach up to 2m. if it grows as a creeping plant.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Tony Willis on December 23, 2010, 11:15:16 AM
Lilium 'Orange Marmalade' in flower now with a snowy back drop..

I bought it as a refrigerated bulb at the RHS show at Tatton in June for October flowering. The cold has slowed it down
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: ThomasB on December 29, 2010, 04:41:17 PM
Neither a flower nor foliage but the frozen rose hips tell it's definitely december in the northern hemisphere.  :)
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Roma on December 29, 2010, 07:16:04 PM
Temperatures down to -7 at least twice in the greenhouse in the last month but Ipheion 'Alberto Castillo' is looking well and even producing flower buds.
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: cohan on December 29, 2010, 11:09:18 PM
Neither a flower nor foliage but the frozen rose hips tell it's definitely december in the northern hemisphere.  :)
yikes--lots of ice!
rose hips are the only fruit that reliably persists over winter here!
Title: Re: December 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere
Post by: Martin Baxendale on December 29, 2010, 11:18:24 PM
Lilium 'Orange Marmalade' in flower now with a snowy back drop..

I bought it as a refrigerated bulb at the RHS show at Tatton in June for October flowering. The cold has slowed it down

Very pretty.