Scottish Rock Garden Club Forum

General Subjects => Wisley Alpine Log – Feedback Forum => Topic started by: admin on August 03, 2007, 12:37:52 PM

Title: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: admin on August 03, 2007, 12:37:52 PM
Please use this forum for feedback on the new Wisley Alpine Log. Create as many topics as you wish!  ;)

see also this: http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=677.0
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log
Post by: Maggi Young on August 03, 2007, 01:03:06 PM
Congratulations to Paul and his Wisley Colleagues for this exciting innovation.


I am intriqued by the charming Aptosimum sp. shown....I am unfamiliar with this plant and interested to read the comments about smoke-aided germination. This is a subject that has been raised on this Forum, so obviouslyof interest to us!
Here are two links to "smokey" subjects:

http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=335.0
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=227.0
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log
Post by: Maggi Young on August 03, 2007, 01:03:59 PM
It is terrific to see the ongoing work at Wisley.. plenty there to keep the Staff busy... but they are not all keeping so active.. here is a pic of Sunny, the smallest member of staff, and she's certainly asleep on the job!
[attachthumb=1]
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Carlo on August 03, 2007, 01:35:36 PM
Congratulations Paul and the rest of the Wisley crew! What great fun to have a window into the alpine world at the garden. It's wonderful to see your continuing work (hard to believe that it's already over two years since I visited). Thanks for keeping us "posted."

Carlo
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: ranunculus on August 03, 2007, 01:53:58 PM
A tremendous and highly encouraging addition to the sites of both the SRGC and the AGS.
Our heartfelt thanks to the instigators, the contributors and to Wisley itself for allowing us this insight into the workings of such a renowned and celebrated institution.

More time to be spent in front of the computer ------ ???
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 03, 2007, 02:16:29 PM
This is really a great addition to an already excellent site.

The gardens at Wisley have been one of our very favourite places to visit and we have travelled there many times and have always enjoyed the visits very much. The alpine house has, of course, been of special interest and always one of our spots to see. It will be great to watch the redevelopment here on the site and in real life when we can next get round to visit.

Many thanks for taking the time to write the blog. I have no doubt it will be followed with great interest by the members of this site.

Paddy

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Andrew on August 03, 2007, 04:46:31 PM
Please use this forum for feedback on the new Wisley Alpine Log. Create as many topics as you wish!  ;)

and remember to click notify on the board, if you want to know when new topics are added.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: ian mcenery on August 03, 2007, 05:43:38 PM
More please!!!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on August 05, 2007, 07:45:03 PM
Wow, I'm amazed at so many hits for the first day. And thanks to those of you who have already posted their appreciation of the log. Maggi, I'm afraid Sunny often sleeps on the job these days! She is getting quite old now - we think around 13 years - so we forgive her for her increasing siestas. Mind you, when she does move it can be dramatic - she doesn't seem to bother with small things like mice but goes for squirrels and even once a weasel brought in and proudly displayed to us. That's one tough pussy.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on August 05, 2007, 07:55:46 PM
Fair enough, Paul, if Sunny is a teenager she may be allowed the odd lie-in!

We are thrilled that the Wisley log is online and delighted with the response. It is rewarding for you, I'm sure, having put in the effort to get it started.... now comes the work to keep it going.... just like a garden, really!



All this excitment about new items reminds me that you may not have noticed Sandy Leven's  latest article... see it here: http://www.srgc.org.uk/feature/sandyjuly2007/content.html
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: admin on August 05, 2007, 08:16:17 PM
Well done to you Paul. The number of "hits"  is usually highest for the first few days of any new feature or update. I am certain it will be even more popular once more folk get to know about it.

Ian's bulb log is now famous amongst  "planty people" and has been a key feature in making this site as successful as it is. I have no doubt the Wisley Log will be just the same!

Web sites are fine – but it's not "bells and whistles"  that bring in the visitors – it's good, varied content.

Thanks on behalf of the SRGC web team, please keep them coming!

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: ChrisB on August 06, 2007, 10:50:36 PM
Its nice to be able to 'share' Wisley, a place I have been able to go only a few times.  And I shall be trying one of those smoke thingies from Silverhills.  What a good idea.  Thanks Wisley for pointing this out.  Hope they work.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on August 15, 2007, 06:28:54 PM
A new log from Wisley on today... have you seen it yet? Really super pictures of the construction of the new alpine house... very swish building, indeed! One of those would look very smart here, and the Bulb Despot would like it, too. ::)  I think it was a great idea to have the new "top" built to fit the existing footprint.... although this may have cost more in terms of money and lead time, the speed of getting the new structure in place must make up for that. The colour is a good choice, I'm sure. I presume it ( the metal frame) is pretty much maintenance free ?

Bit disappointed to see the fancy mowing machine being used in the meadow.... all those workers and not a scythe in sight... shame on you...  ;)
Thanks, Paul and the Gang!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on August 15, 2007, 06:31:46 PM
Quote
The grass is raked into piles, loaded onto a trailer and taken out to the arboretum where it is spread as mulch around the trees

Forgive my ignorance, I have not been to Wisley.... I am assuming that the trees in the arboretum are planted in grass.... is this grass from the meadow then spread directly on to the grass of the arboretum, without composting ?
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 15, 2007, 11:23:14 PM
Paul,

Great to see such progress on the glasshouse, looks really great and I know the plants will look fabulous when you put them in.

Also good to see the team at Wisley engage in some hay saving but one question: why do English gardeners insist on using those short handled forks? Do you not have any with decent long handles?


Many thanks for the update.

Paddy
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Gene Mirro on August 18, 2007, 06:59:12 AM
What medium are they using to plunge the pots in?  It looks like sand/gravel.  Do they do anything special to keep the potted plants from rooting into the plunge mix?
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on August 19, 2007, 05:47:21 PM
Thanks for the comments & questions everyone, here are some quick answers: Yes Maggi, the Aluminium frame of the new house should be pretty much maintenance-free. Alitex did leave us a couple of tins of green touch-up paint in case of the inevitable occasional knock or scratch. This coming week the electricians will be sorting out the power supply and our on-site chap re-connecting the water supply. Once these are done we can at last get on to the exciting bit – moving in the plants and putting on a new display!

Gene, the plunge medium is washed sharp sand. As this house is just for display, plants are not in it long enough to root out into the plunge. However, when back behind the scenes in their growing houses most are also kept in plunges and here it can be a problem. We don’t have a real solution other than to lift pots occasionally and trim off protruding roots – most of them don’t seem to suffer from this indignity. The many benefits of plunging far outweigh this down side.

On to the meadow questions. Let people loose with scythes…? I have visions of multiple unattached feet…and worse still think of the paperwork to do a sensible risk assessment!! More seriously, moving the cut grass to the arboretum is done the same day, without composting. The trees are grown in grass but there is a 2 metre diameter circle around each tree where there is no grass (i.e. it is bare ground). This is because research has shown that trees, especially young ones, establish and grow better by not having grass or other competing plants around their bases. The grass is put onto these bare circles where it helps to keep the weeds down. We have considered other options; the best solution would probably be to get the hay baled and fed to horses in local stables. However the amount we produce is so small that this is uneconomical and we think the best compromise solution was to use it on site, which is also good environmentally as there is very little transport involved – less than a hay mile!

Paddy as for long-handled forks, I’m tempted to say that it is not the size of your tool but what you do with it….but seriously it is odd that the short versions are almost universal here. We do have some long ones for anyone who prefers to use one, but few do. Personally I do find the long handles ones very awkward to use. Maybe it’s a question of what you are used to.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paddy Tobin on August 20, 2007, 03:58:33 PM
Paul,

Re forks/tools, as we would say here regarding footballers: 'a good big one is always better than a good small one'

Paddy
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: gote on August 20, 2007, 06:08:49 PM
I doubt that a scyte is much more dangerous than the tool in use but:
A: Not all can use them (The difficult part is to keep them sharp) and it is much more work.
B: The decision to make is: Do I do this because I need excercise or because I want the grass cut?
We do the same thing but we usually cart the grass away to our neighbour's cattle.
Since we want as much seed as possible and our seasons are later we do it around September 1st just in time before the Crocuses.
It works well. We get a little more wildflowers in the meadow every year.
Göte

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Gene Mirro on August 21, 2007, 05:39:07 AM
Paul, what do you consider to be the benefits of plunging pots?  I believe a moderation of soil temperature swings would be one.  What else?  And thanks for sharing your expertise on this forum. 
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 25, 2007, 03:18:03 PM
Gene,
Just a comment from a Wisley outsider who has been using plunge beds for almost two decades in a very tough gardening climate (-45C winters, mid-winter thaws, lack of snow cover).

Firstly I would say that my (coarse sand) plunge bed is without question THE most important and valuable thing I ever constructed for my business. At the end of the season, everything I can manage to fit in, goes in and is overwintered here. Seedlings that are too tiny to overwinter, trees, shrubs, bulbous material. Plants in pots, in flats, whatever. They are plunged to their rims in logical "depth of container" rows (for practial reasons). The bed is left totally exposed to the elements. I would say that no matter what kind of winter I have, the overwintering rate is very high (over 80%).

Very large, deep pots (when the plunge bed is full) get the same treatment, but are put in "graves" in the now-empty vegetable garden. Tight up against each other, backfilled with whatever soil is there. Overwintering here is also very high.

From my experience, I am not convinced that the sand plunge bed necessarily does a better job of overwintering just because the pots are in sand (except in a winter where there is a flooding problem in the area, and then the faster drainage obviously helps). However, the ease of doing the actual plunging makes the sand a better choice. It's a rather pleasant job in the late fall, working in the sand bed. Sand obviously has to be moist to do the work of digging well---so if there has been no rain, I will have to wet it down with the sprinklers before I start.

The picture I have posted is just a small section of the plunge---I am guessing it is about a 50 by 25' area.

Kristl
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Carlo on August 25, 2007, 03:44:32 PM
Looks fantastic Kristl...is that a stone walkway down the middle? How deep is the bed?
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Carlo on August 25, 2007, 03:45:25 PM
Oh, and are you plunging clay and plastic pots?

Obviously Wisley's bed (being raised) is a different beast altogether...
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 25, 2007, 04:24:59 PM
Hi Carlo,
Nice to find so many old friends on this forum....

The sand plunge is at ground level, yes, and is entirely sand. It's only my German/Slovakian obsession with logic and efficiency that compels me to line things up so that they appear to be other than what they are  :) So, no stone or other "hard" walkway, just a good, straight line in the sand every so many feet for easy access to the pots in the spring (when mostly everything is pulled out).

I don't pot in clay generally so no, there are no clay pots plunged, even on an experimental basis.

The bed is not very deep---as the initial intention when it was built almost 20 years ago was to plunge alpines in small pots. It's approximately 12-18" deep. Framed with railway posts.

When the sand level goes down (as it inevitable does every few years (sand ends up in the top of the pots, and I continually "steal" from it during the summer for potting, etc), the tri-axle load truck can back right up to the area and dump another load straight in. I then (feeling very Japanese-German-Slovakian), spend time raking it smooth and level to ready it for the next round of plunging.

Kristl
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Kristl Walek on August 25, 2007, 04:34:52 PM
a P.S....

For gardeners in a cold climate, the plunge offers, I think, the best alternative to overwintering both established plants and young seedlings too small to safely overwinter any other way. In my experience, cold frames cannot even come close to what is possible in a plunge bed.

Kristl

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: ChrisB on August 25, 2007, 09:28:37 PM
I have just filled half of my (Alitex) cold frame with sand to create a plunge bed.  It has a brick base.  Don't know why I've never thought of doing this before.  Have taken one of the covers off and left one on, so I can have the best of both worlds - my floury auriculas can leaf successfully without losing their ?what is that stuff called? and I can control the amount of water I give to my bulbs whilst in the other side I can over winter more rain tolerant plants and seeds I shall sow this autumn.  Already there is not enough room!  I use the other side for very large pots that need winter protection, but I am now tempted to get another dumpy bag of sand and put it in there too.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on August 25, 2007, 09:33:55 PM
"Floury stuff" equals "farina... Ive said it before and I'll say it again... there's often a clue! ;D
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on August 27, 2007, 12:05:47 PM
Thanks everyone for the discussion on plunges. I think plunges are really useful and so I intend to make the next Wisley Log all about them - so Gene I'll answer your question there this coming week.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on September 19, 2007, 12:47:43 AM
A great new log edition. How wonderful to have a whole, brand new house to plant! The planting and the plants are superb. And the pictures too are amazing, a great thrill, like our own person show bench. Thanks so very much, everyone involved. I'm especially pleased to see the Empodium as I was given a potful of semi dormant bulbs recently. Something super to look forward to.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: alanelliott on October 02, 2007, 05:10:37 PM
More of Gemma please now she's started so the rest of us students at RBGE can keep and eye on her!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: tonyg on October 12, 2007, 05:27:57 PM
What a fantastic display of Crocus nudiflorus - has anyone seen it in the wild?  I imagine that is as good a display as the wild plants make .... now I just need to find a bigger garden and ...  :) 
The nototriche is verty crocus-like as you say.  How does it rate in terms of difficulty of cultivation?  Do you get seed from your plants? ;)
Thanks for sharing the news and views from Wisley with us Paul.  Even some of us southerners rarely get there so it is much appreciated.
Title: Re: Nototriche macleanii
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on October 13, 2007, 01:04:04 PM
Thanks to everyone for the supportive and appreciative comments, I'm glad you are enjoying the log. Tony asked about cultivation for the Nototriche. As yet I have little experience as we have only had these plants less than a year. We got seed which we sowed as soon as it arrived in April. It germinated readily and has produced flowers in its first year, about 6 months from sowing. I potted half the plants in our standard alpine mix and half in pure Seramis to see what worked best. Both have grown equally well, though the ones in Seramis have been the first to flower. I have watered them "normally" i.e. like any average alpine and had them under glass with full light. The ones in Seramis were fed at every watering with a low nitrogen, high potash feed.

No seed yet but this is due to the fading flowers being removed - not what I had asked for! But these plants are out in the public dispaly house where fading flowers are removed regularly to keep plants looking good and its obvious my instructions not to remove these particular ones didn't filter down to everyone. These things unfortunately happen sometimes in a busy department! We also have Nototriche compacta and this has readily set seed, so I'm hopeful that N. macleanii will too.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: mark smyth on October 13, 2007, 01:25:16 PM
all the Wisley logs have been great. Makes me want to visit even more now. I was at Wisley once for the Geranium trials but it left no time for anything else
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Casalima on October 13, 2007, 03:05:54 PM
all the Wisley logs have been great. Makes me want to visit even more now. I was at Wisley once for the Geranium trials but it left no time for anything else

What Mark said!!

And my plans are to go there next Friday! I am very much looking forward to it!

Chloë
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: gote on October 15, 2007, 08:59:08 PM
Yes I have seen C nudiflorus in the wild. On horse pastures in the Pyrenees on the south side On the road that goes from Vic north to the mountains and then to Andorra. They were lighter in colour and definitely not so thick.

Did I say something on blanket weed? (in an earlier Wisley log someone was fishing) Lymnea stagnalis a fresh water snail will keep it down.

Göte
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Casalima on October 19, 2007, 08:19:08 PM
I'm happy to say that the new Alpine House in Wisley was looking quite wonderful today. The Cyclamen in particular were perfectly splendid, but I also enjoyed the Polyxena and the Petrocosmea.

Chloë
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on October 19, 2007, 08:29:47 PM
Glad to hear you are having a good rootle around, Chloë.... Wisley and Kew, eh? Enjoy your trip.. we'll enjoy learning where you've been!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Darren on January 14, 2008, 01:09:17 PM
Paul,
         I'm really enjoying the log. Great to see the Massonia and Daubenya. Time these, and polyxena, got some more publicity. Some years ago you kindly advised me on cleaning up my Pleione collection from a suspected Brevipalpus infestation and I'm delighted to report that your advice was spot on!

Darren.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 02, 2008, 07:09:03 PM
Another great Log from Paul online now. http://www.srgc.org.uk/wisley/2008/020208/log.html
 Wonderful Iris... and Hepatica nobilis var. japonica - yellow flowered form--- oh, covet, covet!!
And, last but not least, many congratulations to Lucie on her award.  8) ;D
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: mark smyth on February 02, 2008, 07:14:26 PM
Two things I want - the yellow Hepatica and the Ranunculus ficaria
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: mark smyth on February 02, 2008, 07:25:39 PM
I believe Galanthus 'Kite' is wrong. 'Kite' is an elwesii that should have twin flowers
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: David Nicholson on February 03, 2008, 12:26:31 PM
Just caught up with the last two Wisley Logs both of the usual high standard. Sincere thanks to Paul for taking the time and the trouble to prepare them in what must be a very busy schedule for him. It's an absolute joy for me to see good plants, well grown in first class facilities. Makes my amateur ramblings and shamblings look what they very much are.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Paul Cumbleton on February 03, 2008, 10:05:28 PM
Hi Mark,
Thanks for the comment on G. 'Kite'. I am no Snowdrop expert and I just took the name on the label. Unfortunately in a public garden labels have a habit of being moved by the visitors and put back in the wrong place and I guess that is what hapeened here.

The Ranunculus should be available from some nurseries as Trevor supllied it for propagation and introduction to a few of them. As for the yellow Hepatica...a trip to Japan would be necessary!
Paul
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 03, 2008, 10:30:07 PM
Quote
As for the yellow Hepatica...a trip to Japan would be necessary
It would be worth it, though... think of all the other plants we could get there...... OOOHH!!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Diane Clement on February 03, 2008, 10:34:22 PM
As for the yellow Hepatica...a trip to Japan would be necessary!

And a very large purse containing many many yen ...
;D  ;D
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 03, 2008, 10:36:50 PM
But, Diane, what's a yen when you have a yen? 
Can't take it with you, may as well take it to Japan....everyone I know who has been there says how great a time they had.............. says the woman who doesn't get out much :-[
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 13, 2009, 09:47:25 PM
Wisley Log No. 4 of 2009 is online..... see the snow was pretty bad down there...... :P  .....but very pretty!!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: gote on February 14, 2009, 09:52:33 AM
Japan is the nicest place to visit.
It is very clean, very safe. If you drop your wallet on the street it will either be in the hotel before you when you arrive or in the nearest police station WITH ALL MONEY INTACT ;D ;D.
The trains go VERY frequently and on the second. If you buy a voucher BEFORE YOU LEAVE EUROPE you can travel as much as you please.
It is very beautiful in places (Countryside, Temples, Shrines) and very ugly in some (Industrial areas, half modern cities)
If you use the hotels foreigners are directed to, they are very expensive (fitting your status as honoured guest)
If you stay where the Japanese stay, the prices are as in Europe.
Japanese food can be extremely pricey or fairly cheap. In my taste usually excellent.
Language is a problem in some situations, adresses is a problem in some situations. There are tricks of the trade to get around this.
The big hurdle is that Ryan Air does not fly to Osaka. :(
The picture which is a bad scan is from an inner court in the temple dedicated to Hideyoshi in the Higashiyama area of Kyoto.
Göte
PS
The slightest provokation will make me flood the forum with japanese pictures not dedicated to alpines ;)

 
 
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 14, 2009, 11:15:22 AM
Göte, since the Japanese make so many beautiful flower hybrids, like the Hepaticas, let alone the natural native plant life,  and since you believe it is such a good place to visit, and, it seems, can give helpful hints to make a visit easier for Europeans, then I do think that we MUST hope to  provoke you sufficiently for you to make a new thread in the Travel/places to visit area about Japan. 8)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: gote on February 14, 2009, 12:48:10 PM
OK I will see what I can do.
In the meantime, anybody having Google Earth (which is free) can find the position of the photograper in
35° 00' 02.41" N;  135° 46' 52.72" E.
It is amazing is it not?
Göte
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on March 11, 2009, 03:48:15 PM
Hello, Folks,  new Wisley Log is now online, No. 6 of 2009 .
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: David Nicholson on March 11, 2009, 07:43:37 PM
..... and some cracking Hepatica pics on it.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on December 11, 2009, 01:51:06 PM
Paul cumbleton has been off work, suffering with a bad back but he's back on his feet at work and his latest log is just loaded online.... see it here:

http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2009Dec111260539350Log_25_of_2009.pdf 
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on December 12, 2009, 08:30:47 PM
As always, a loverly Log. I particularly like the little form of Narc. bulbocodium. So many are partially obscured by their luxurient foliage but this one's bends over nicely to display the flowers well.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: angie on December 12, 2009, 10:49:54 PM
Glad to hear that Paul's back is better, enjoyed the log as always.
Angie :)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on January 07, 2010, 01:01:05 PM
The first Wisley Log of 2010 is online:
 http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Jan071262869051Log_1_of_2010.pdf

Paul is stuck at home because of the snow, and Wisley is closed to the public..... "elf 'an' safety!"

So see the log and be treated to some great plants in Pauls' own collection.... and be jealous, as I was, of the range of lovely bird protraits he's made in his garden.... 8)

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on January 07, 2010, 08:29:19 PM
The diversion to birdlife was very pleasing and welcome. It's lovely for me who, of those illustrated, has only the goldfinch and the greenfinch, in her garden..

Gorgeous Massonias too.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: angie on January 07, 2010, 09:07:52 PM
Wow birds are beautiful but as for those Massonias what a amazing collection, cant get over the size of Massonia depressa and your Massonia pustlulata is out of this world, thanks for the close up pictures, they are just stunning. If I had plants like those I would be moving my sofa into my greenhouse, what more could you ask for Paul. Thanks for showing them to us
Angie :)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: fleurbleue on January 15, 2010, 05:27:50 PM
Amazing Parakeets in your garden  :o Thanks for all these poor birds  ;)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: mark smyth on January 15, 2010, 06:34:54 PM
No young ring-necks at this time of year but adults will be in the mood for laying now. The bird at the feeder could be male or female because young males take 2-3 years to get the ring. The best pet I ever had was a silly tame hand reared male
Title: Wisley Log http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Apr011270112980Log_7
Post by: Stone Rider on April 03, 2010, 08:21:01 PM
No young ring-necks at this time of year but adults will be in the mood for laying now. The bird at the feeder could be male or female because young males take 2-3 years to get the ring. The best pet I ever had was a silly tame hand reared male
 

 Wisley Log http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Apr011270112980Log_7_of_2010.pdf
 Primula allionii males and females are perfectly presented in the fresh April log. Congratulation to England for the elegance and top quality pictures.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on April 03, 2010, 11:24:07 PM
A very nice illustrated lesson in the cultivation of one group of popular plants. I wish we had the opportunity here in the far south, to put it into practice. :'(
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on June 25, 2010, 11:58:27 AM
Super new Wisley Log just loaded to the website, Folks:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Jun251277462979Log_12_of_2010.pdf
thanks, Paul!
  8)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on June 25, 2010, 01:22:25 PM
In case you have not noticed the new notice on this section of the forum, may I draw your attention to http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5672.0

Notice from Paul Cumbleton about a very special opportunity:

"Each year at Wisley we offer a funded 1 year study course for a student wishing to specialise in Alpines. For the course starting this September we still have a vacancy and need to find someone as soon as possible. It's a great opportunity for someone - if you think you may be interested full details can be found at:

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Courses/Horticultural-training/Courses-at-RHS-Garden-Wisley/Specialist-Option-Certificate-in-Rock-and-Alpine-G

You will need certain previous qualifications and experience, but this and all other details can be found at the link above. The given closing date for entries of Jan 31st this year can be ignored, but we do need applications urgently now. If you think you know anyone who may be interested but who does not read this forum, please do let them know of this opportunity.

Thanks very much for your time in reading this."

Paul Cumbleton
Team Leader
Alpine Department
RHS Wisley

 This position now filled; Paul say he is "pleased to report that we have found a suitable candidate who has accepted the place. This means the opportunity is now closed. But this opportunity is repeated every year, so if anyone isinterested in the position for 2011 to 2012, commencing September 2011, do contact us."
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Gail on June 25, 2010, 01:28:01 PM
What a wonderful opportunity!  I wonder if I could abandon my family for a year???
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on June 25, 2010, 05:50:56 PM
Dunno, Gail..... how big a freezer have you got ?..... it would mean a lot of pre-cooking......... ::)

It is a wonderful chance to be able to apply for this placement...... I do urge anyone who knows someone who might be interested to spread the word of this opportunity.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on June 27, 2010, 06:49:04 AM
An excellent solution to solve the Sunny problem. ;D Aciphyllas could be employed too, but the cacti look wonderful. 8) And oh those gorgeous Calochortus!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on September 02, 2010, 08:48:39 AM
2nd September 2010 - Wisley Log 16 of 2010

An artistic slant to the latest Wisley Log, as the Surrey Sculpture Society are again exhibiting some of their creations around the garden and Paul shares his favourites with us  8)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on September 16, 2010, 11:02:04 AM
A new Wisley log is online today, with photos of the area where the new crevice  garden is planned. Plus some bright South African Bulbs to cheer our  day :
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Sep161284630599Log_17_of_2010.pdf
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: angie on September 16, 2010, 05:36:48 PM
Love that Brunsvigia bosmaniae if I had that flowering in my greenhouse I would have to move in myself.
I wonder how long the flower would last.
Really nice log again thanks for sharing these lovely plants with us.

Angie :) 
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Bob Resch on September 17, 2010, 02:31:44 AM

This process apparently is known and used in South Africa and used to treat Leucospermums (pincushions), Leucadendrons, Ericas, Strelitzias, Helichrysums (everlastings), restios (Cape grasses), Lobelias, grasses, sedges, mesembs (vygies), Geleznowia, Hibbertia, Stirlingia, Verticordia, Actinostrobus, Pimelea, Lechenaultia Anigozanthus and many other species. (this information extracted from website)
It looks like a small industry has been started supplying materials for the process.

Information sources below:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/949419/ A forum popular in the States

http://finebushpeople.co.za/smoke_primer.html "Smoke Primer in Protea Seed Germination
How Smoke Primer disks increase fynbos and protea seed germination rates."
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Lesley Cox on September 26, 2010, 10:13:29 PM
Lucky Sunny to have such and elegant and interesting boudoir. ;D
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: gote on November 06, 2010, 07:19:20 AM
A note on log 15 re cleaning of ponds
Blanket weed can be kept down by introducing the snail Lymnaea stagnalis If they get in early enough, there will be zero blanket weed - at least in my ponds.
Göte
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on November 10, 2010, 06:26:35 PM
A new Wisley log is online, with photos of the area where the new crevice  garden is planned.
[url]http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2010Sep161284630599Log_17_of_2010.pdf[/url]


 Well, just as we were counting down the days to Paul updating us with his next Wisley Log to tell us how the Crevice Garden project is getting along, the Forum has a sneak-peak at it!! Giles has been to Wisley and shows a great photo of how far along the work is .... ZZ  has obviously been working at full tilt  with the Wisley Workers and just  look at how much is done already.......
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=6223.new#new

We could see from Paul's photos in the Log of the preprared area that this was going to be a pretty impressive crevice garden.... and the huge bags of stone were substantial..... but to see this much progress in around a week.... it's tremendous! This will surely be of huge interest to visitors. 
I must admit (I'll say this quietly!!) that not all crevice gardens are completely to my taste..... but this one looks to be a cracker!
 Fantastic work by ZZ and the Wisley Workers  and thanks to Giles for bringing us the photo!

Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on December 21, 2010, 12:25:08 PM
New Wisley Log from Paul is now online..... some sumptuous colours to cheer those of us struggling with winter weather!  8) 8)
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on February 12, 2011, 08:11:54 PM
That excellent photographer, Jon Evans, has been at Wisley and has posted a series of delightful photos from the Alpine House, new crevice gardens and also more exotic species in this topic in the AGS website..... I commend it to you....
http://www.alpinegardensociety.net/discussion/inthegarden//RHS+Wisley+in+February+/480/?page=1
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Tim Ingram on August 12, 2011, 06:40:35 PM
I really like the 'tower' of sempervivums! The plants look so strong - mine in the garden seem to grow at a snails pace. Presumably feeding is the answer. It is also exciting to see the Castilleja; I must refer back to the article in 'The Plantsman'. The only other plant growing outside that I've seen was in David and Stella Rankin's garden in Edinburgh. I think they have had some success with Pedicularis too (?) - it would be amazing to see these in gardens!!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on August 12, 2011, 09:23:47 PM
I think you are correct about the Rankins and the Pedicularis, Tim.
I believe they have had some success with several species, though I cannot say which, or if they are still growing them. I was very envious when I heard because I am very fond of pedicularis; I find them wonderful plants, especially some of the more showy Chinese and Himalayan types.

I covet Castellejas, too!
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Tim Ingram on September 28, 2011, 08:55:24 AM
Paul - thank you so much for your latest log. There are so many plants there that I don't know or haven't seen before, and the alpine house is extremely exciting. The Sphaeralcea on the sand bed is a definite must - but I shall have to extend my bed significantly after recent purchases! (And after listening to Peter Korn's lecture at Lamberton). An interesting P.S.; we have just had a talk from Marina Christopher on good plants for encouraging insects into the garden. She gardens on quite heavy wet soil and does well with many late perennials, but like most gardeners also wants to grow species less suited to her conditions. As a result she has had 60 tons (!) of chalk dumped in the garden. It will be really interesting to see how plants establish on this. Like sand gardening it shows how the boundaries of gardening can be pushed if your primary interest is widening the range of plants growable in the garden. (Of course she is also a very fine nurserywoman which gives even more incentive to grow good plants to propagate and collect seed from).
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on September 28, 2011, 10:25:13 AM
Some details.....that might be useful after Tim's last post...
 Marina Christopher, Paice Lane, Medstead, GU34 5PR    : Phoenix Perennial Plants

http://www.franceslincoln.com/en/Contributor/449/Marina_Christopher.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/design/plant_recipes/wildlife_index.shtml



Plant Finder gives a web address but the link doesn't work.
Title: Re: Wisley Alpine Log Feedback
Post by: Maggi Young on January 08, 2012, 01:31:15 PM
For an exciting visit to Wisley to cheer you in early January, see this thread:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8326.0
     8) 8)