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1
Grow From Seed / Re: Grow from seed!
« Last post by David Nicholson on Today at 09:22:29 AM »
Well done Maggi.
2
Pleione and Orchidaceae / Re: Scented Pleione
« Last post by vigor on Today at 05:47:35 AM »
In my experience, Pleione maculata has the most obvious fragrance, which is kind of sweet smell. So do its offspring with the scented P. paecox, P.  lagenaria and P.  Confirmaton
3
Ian,

These are great questions. You can see from the following that I am working on answering these questions and others. Give me some time to go over my data (this is a work in progress) and looking into other published material.

I was also giving thought to your other posting regarding the commodification of Nature (Reserves need to pay their way). Needless to say, this approach is too often a disaster for nature. This can be demonstrated to be true, however the ones setting these policies are not interested in data or facts. In addition, Nature is often altered beyond restoration to it's original condition before misguided policies can be stopped. The current state of the planet is a testament to this.

19 January 2019
0000 UTC

I just got back from the western slope of the Sierra Nevada in Eldorado National Forest. There is good news. The precipitation total, to date 18 January, on Peavine Ridge is now at 20.01 inches, 508.25 mm. This is an increase of 4.78 inches, 121.41 mm since the evening of 14 January. Unfortunately, the majority of the precipitation fell as rain. There was only 3.5 cm of snow on the ground with a liquid equivalent 0.36 inches, 9.14 mm.

Snow cover duration, is an important variable in forest vegetation type. Studies in the central Alps have demonstrated the relationship between hydric continentality [ratio of altitude (m) to annual precipitation (mm); the index can be expressed as tan-1 (Z/P)], snow cover duration, and annual temperature range to forest vegetation type. I enjoy using simple modeling to express the climatic and vegetation changes taking place in El Dorado County and Eldordo National Forest.
4
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: January 2019 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 10:45:30 PM »
back to celmisia ....   C. thomsonii is  known for the pink colouring to its petals

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Celmisia thomsonii

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 C. thomsonii - Hamish reports that he saw lots of this - but it was very hard to get a good photo of it as it only grows on overhanging, permanently wet cliffs.


 and to finish -  Celmisi lyallii
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5
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: January 2019 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 10:39:26 PM »
some more from Hamish....

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Another great Celmisia

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Celmisia hectori

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Celmisia sp.

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Kelleria childii

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Parahebe linifolia
6
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: January 2019 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 10:38:44 PM »
Hamish - next few ....
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Aciphylla pinnatifida

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Aciphylla spedenii

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Hebe sp.

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Myosotis glabra

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Myosotis macrantha
7
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: January 2019 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 10:36:02 PM »
next from Hamish - a selection of Celmisia philocrmena.....

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C. philocremna and Raoulia buchananii fighting it out





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8
Flowers and Foliage Now / Re: January 2019 in the Southern Hemisphere
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 10:33:50 PM »
Hamish Brown has just spent three days in the Eyre Mountains - with his camera!  And he has kindly agreed that I may share them here.  Thanks, Hamish!
While photographing many of these plants is extremely difficult - they grow in some  very "unhandy" places to capture their full grandeur -  Hamish has got some real beautires here - he suggested to me that " It is hard to do these celmisas justice in a photo because so much of there character is in the feel of the foliage and because they grow in difficult places. Next time I think I will take a tripod and tele lenses to try for better photos."

Can you imagine how much harder carrying such gear into the mountains would be?  :o

 Hamish reported that he saw a rock wren and some  chamois in the mountains - but no Keas!
also .... " Three days in the awesome Eyre Mountains on a Celmisia bender. Good times, didn't get the truck stuck going up the valley, no rain, no people, found the Celmisias I went to see (philocremna and thomsonii) looking amazing, and many other interesting plants. Lots of walking and climbing but well worth it I hope you will agree."


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View frm the first night's campsite

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Looking to the head of the  Matara River, early on Day 2

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Everything is flowering well in the monutains this year   ( this seems a bit of an understatement!)

 
Thelymitra cyanea

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Brachyglottis revoluta
 
9
Galanthus / Re: Galanthus in January 2019
« Last post by ielaba2011 on January 18, 2019, 10:26:56 PM »
beautiful pictures, Anne...such a delight just to go through those albums!

Back to my modest G. elwesii: the petals are becoming more pointy, it's a sign the flower is almost over, It happened last year with G. nivalis too.
10
Grow From Seed / Re: Grow from seed!
« Last post by Maggi Young on January 18, 2019, 09:52:38 PM »
there is no end to you talents :)
Aha! You thought I was just a pretty face, eh?!!!
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