We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Massonia pustulata  (Read 9591 times)

Hans J

  • Gardener and Gourmet
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3929
  • Country: de
Massonia pustulata
« on: November 27, 2007, 12:26:37 PM »
Hi all  8)

Here some pics from today :

Massonia pustulata

This plants are sown by me 1998 .....
I hope they will find some other nice relatives soon ;)
“Summer is the time when it’s too hot to do the job that it was too cold to do last winter” Mark Twain

David Shaw

  • SRGC Publications Manager
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1231
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2007, 01:00:38 PM »
Curious wee plant, Hans. I assume that it is the leaves that give it such an unfortunate name.
David Shaw, Forres, Moray, Scotland

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 40415
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2007, 01:13:31 PM »
Got it in one, David......... there's often a clue.....er, I may have said THAT before!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Peter Korn, Sweden

  • Superman
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
  • Country: 00
  • the earth moves for him
    • Peter Korns Trädgård
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2007, 07:53:26 PM »
Massonia echinata is hardy but very slow. After 6 year my bulb decided to split into two but then it didn´t flower this year. I have it in sand on a hot raised bed with Cacti.

Gerdk

  • grower of sweet violets
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2007, 06:39:55 AM »
Massonia echinata is hardy but very slow. After 6 year my bulb decided to split into two but then it didn´t flower this year. I have it in sand on a hot raised bed with Cacti.

Peter,
Would you please explain your hot raised bed (outside, any cover)?
Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Peter Korn, Sweden

  • Superman
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
  • Country: 00
  • the earth moves for him
    • Peter Korns Trädgård
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2007, 03:54:18 PM »
It´s a raised bed sloping to south. 40 cm well drained sand (0-8mm) covered with stones and grit. I don´t cover anything in the winter and I never water anything in the garden so in the summer it can get realy dry. Perfect for cacti and bulbs.

Peter Korn, Sweden

  • Superman
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
  • Country: 00
  • the earth moves for him
    • Peter Korns Trädgård
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2007, 04:03:58 PM »
Pictures from today. A normal november day. -6 last night and then it started to rain this morning.

heinz tessner

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
    • Massonia, Erdorchideen, Hepatica & Co.
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2007, 05:01:28 PM »
Peter,

fantastic pictures! How deep is the deppest temperature you have wintertimes? How many days in a row?

Heinz

Peter Korn, Sweden

  • Superman
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
  • Country: 00
  • the earth moves for him
    • Peter Korns Trädgård
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2007, 05:42:42 PM »
A normal winter it goes down to -25C but the record the last 5 years is -32C. The snowcover last for a few weeks and then it rains for a few days and then snow again...... But the winter to 2006 we had snow from november to april. I prefer bare ground, it´s much easier to digg when there is not to much snow.

Paul Cumbleton

  • Pleione Wizard
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 530
  • Country: gb
    • The Pleione Website
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2007, 10:12:23 PM »
Hi Peter
The plant you show as Massonia echinata looks very much to me more like the summer-flowering form of Massonia jasminiflora. When does this one normally grow and flower for you?
Paul Cumbleton, Somerton, Somerset, U.K. Zone 8b (U.S. system plant hardiness zone)

I occasionally sell spare plants on ebay -
see http://ebay.eu/1n3uCgm

http://www.pleione.info/

Peter Korn, Sweden

  • Superman
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
  • Country: 00
  • the earth moves for him
    • Peter Korns Trädgård
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2007, 07:43:32 AM »
It flowers in June and stays green all summer.
Another very nice hardy bulb from South Africa is Moraea modesta. I grow it in the same conditions as the Massonia.

Paul T

  • Our man in Canberra
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8440
  • Country: au
  • Paul T.
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2007, 08:03:22 AM »
Paul,

I grow Massonia jasminiflora (well as far as I know it is correctly named) but mine has none of the leaf markings at all.  A favourite of mine as it flowers well but is nice and petite!!

Peter,

That Moraea is VERY nice.  Interesting colours to it, and definitely a species I haven't come across before.  Thanks for the pic.
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

WimB

  • always digs deeper...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2620
  • Country: be
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2007, 09:17:38 AM »
Peter,

very nice pictures and a good idea.
Which other species (cacti/bulbs) have you planted in that raised bed?

Wim
Wim Boens - Secretary VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Flemish Rock Garden society (VRV): http://www.vrvforum.be/
Facebook page VRV: http://www.facebook.com/pages/VRV-Vlaamse-Rotsplanten-Vereniging/351755598192270

Paul Cumbleton

  • Pleione Wizard
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 530
  • Country: gb
    • The Pleione Website
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2007, 11:36:41 AM »
Hi Peter,
If it flowers in June and is green all summer then it is definitely Massonia jasminiflora, in the summer-flowering form that comes from Lesotho (in the Black Mountains for example). This form often has pustulate leaves and is also very small - the smallest of all the Massonias. The way the leaves stick up in the air rather than lying flat on the ground is also very common in this form. It should be dormant in the winter, unlike all the other Massonias. We have this outside in a sandbed at Wisley, which we cover in winter to keep the rain off.
Paul Cumbleton, Somerton, Somerset, U.K. Zone 8b (U.S. system plant hardiness zone)

I occasionally sell spare plants on ebay -
see http://ebay.eu/1n3uCgm

http://www.pleione.info/

Gerdk

  • grower of sweet violets
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
Re: Massonia pustulata
« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2007, 12:47:05 PM »
It´s a raised bed sloping to south. 40 cm well drained sand (0-8mm) covered with stones and grit. I don´t cover anything in the winter and I never water anything in the garden so in the summer it can get realy dry. Perfect for cacti and bulbs.

Peter,
Thank you for your notes. For me an inspiration to use a lot of sand in the beds I call 'raised' - also I should try to come a little bit more above groundlevel.
Superb results, beautiful frit!
Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

 

In Association with Amazon.co.uk


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942