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Author Topic: Lilium species  (Read 70206 times)

rob krejzl

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2008, 07:39:59 PM »
The best seed source for philadelphicum I know of is a certain canadian member of this forum - good quick germination. Whether they survive into a 3rd year will be the question.
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Lesley Cox

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2008, 09:07:06 PM »
It does all sound terribly technical though. Don't be put off David. Because, in general, your usual method of (and I quote) "put 'em in a pot, cover 'em with grit, shove 'em outside, and leave 'em to it." works very well with all the lilies I've tried from seed which is all the species I have, from nanum and other small species, to martgons, chalcedonicum, parryi, primulinum, nepalense, auratum, speciosum hansonii, canadense and perhaps a couple of dozen of others, It's just a matter of waiting for some. But that's true of all bulbous plants - look at Trillium as an example. Some come this year, some next or the year after or the one after that. In general, I give seedlings water while they're in growth (i.e.visibly green leafed) and little or none while they're not. Seems to work all right.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Gene Mirro

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2008, 01:35:03 AM »
Lesley, we don't  all have your climatic conditions.  Lilies may grow like weeds for you there, but may be nearly impossible for Cris in Portugal, because the summer temperatures there may be 10C higher than on South Island.  This is the problem that gardeners on the US East Coast have with English gardening books, which are often written as if God had inscribed them on gold tablets.  But they don't apply to hot non-maritime continental climates.  So this is why I warn over and over again that the bulbs must be kept cool. 

With regard to germination, if you review my posts, you will see that I agree with you that it is not that difficult.  If you have a delayed hypogeal germinator, and if you don't give them the initial warm period, you will have to wait one extra year to get them to germinate.  No big deal.  Serious gardeners may want to understand why different seeds behave differently, so the explanation of the various germination types is useful for them.  But you need to make sure that the seed flat does not bake in the sun or go dry while you are waiting for germination to occur.
Gene Mirro from the magnificent state of Washington

Lesley Cox

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2008, 04:17:08 AM »
Point taken Gene. In spite of all the moaning and girning we/I do about the climate here, I acknowledge we are truly blest when it comes to the cultivation of most temperate plants. I'd certianly keep all lily seed/seedlings cool as well as well-drained in winter. I've never had to resort to bring such things under cover for darker months. I'm the one that needs that. :)
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

rob krejzl

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2008, 06:22:17 AM »
Quote
This is the problem that gardeners on the US East Coast have with English gardening books, which are often written as if God had inscribed them on gold tablets.

This is also true of McRae's book, which has to be viewed in the light of his growing experience in Oregon. It's very hard for any of us to step outside our own conditions and make truly general comments.

This has been interesting. Thank you everyone.
Southern Tasmania

USDA Zone 8/9

David Nicholson

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2008, 10:08:52 AM »
Very interesting. I don't think I shall get rid of my very simplistic seed sowing regime but I shall certainly try some in plastic bags. One of my major problems is getting fridge space-our salad crisper currently contains 70% assorted seed in assorted boxes awaiting sowing, and 30% salad and some high level moaning is being done about the situation. 
David Nicholson
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Cris

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2008, 11:25:44 AM »
"Cris, L. philadelphicum is very difficult.  Seed germination is unpredictable and irregular, and the plants grow very slowly and have low survival rates.  It is very strange, because in nature they grow in a wide range of conditions."

Gene Mirro,  :'( :'( :'( I have such a eye to the difficult seeds!!!!!
Tanks, I'll sow them and hope the survive.


Kathrine, thanks, I'll take a look.

I've sown Lilium formosanum and they germinated very well. I've soaked them in water for two days, then sown, and after some weeks they've germinate strongly.
Now the little plants are very healty, it's great to look at them.
Cris
Lisboa, Portugal

Lesley Cox

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2008, 07:14:46 PM »
Is it correct that Lilium philipinense is synonymous with L. formosanum? I ask because I've been told it is so but mine (as philipinense) has a wider trumpet, with not so narrow a funnel, as my L. formosanum v. pricei, which of course is smaller but I would have expected it to be simply a much lower version of L. formosanum. It also flowers 2 or 3 or 4 weeks later.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2008, 07:16:38 PM by Lesley Cox »
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

David Nicholson

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2008, 08:31:12 PM »
Is it correct that Lilium philipinense is synonymous with L. formosanum? I ask because I've been told it is so but mine (as philipinense) has a wider trumpet, with not so narrow a funnel, as my L. formosanum v. pricei, which of course is smaller but I would have expected it to be simply a much lower version of L. formosanum. It also flowers 2 or 3 or 4 weeks later.

It wasn't in 1998 according to McRae Lesley although he says it closely resembled formosanum in many respects. He also says that philppinense can acheive flowering size from seed within 8 months.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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David Pilling

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2008, 08:54:23 PM »
It wasn't in 1998 according to McRae Lesley although he says it closely resembled formosanum in many respects. He also says that philppinense can acheive flowering size from seed within 8 months.


Does he mention how to achieve flowering size in that time?

L. formosanum is touted as being fast growing but mine are making slow progress.

BTW there is a handy synonym finder at:

http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/qsearch.do

David Pilling at the seaside in North West England.

rob krejzl

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2008, 09:47:36 PM »
Quote
Is it correct that Lilium philipinense is synonymous with L. formosanum?


Depends who you read. As far as I know formosanum started out as philippinense v. formosanum, so the ambivalence was there from the start. A summary of the two descriptions can be found here (http://www.the-genus-lilium.com/sec6trumpet.htm), so you can at least try to identify yours. The real problem I'd say is keeping the seed pure. These two hybridise quite easily and the hybrids are vigorous and fertile.

Quote
L. formosanum is touted as being fast growing but mine are making slow progress.


Formosanum flowers in six months or so from seed in my garden. If yours isn't you may be growing it a little cold; it also doesn't like being too dry.
Southern Tasmania

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t00lie

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2008, 08:01:52 AM »
Currently flowering for the first time --Lilum duchartrei x Otago Alpine Group --seed sown 8/03.

Planted in a 20 litre poly trough with a few other Lilium sps seedlings it is 'running about' and coming up everywhere .

Cheers dave.
Dave Toole.  Invercargill.Bottom of the South Island New Zealand .Zone 9--Maritime climate .1100mm rainfall PA.

Paul T

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2008, 08:05:28 AM »
Isn't it just glorious!!  A species I don't think I've ever seen a picture of that I didn't like.  Beautiful!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

t00lie

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #28 on: January 11, 2008, 08:45:02 AM »
Paul

I have my fingers crossed that the other numerous growths are just not the stoloniferous stems from the flowering plant and that there will be some variation in the spotting as i planted 5 bulbs last year.

The duchartrei will have to lifted this autumn as they are in the same box as the 'North Americans ' which are yet to bloom and i have concerns about how the N/As will cope with the heavy competition.

Cheers Dave. 
Dave Toole.  Invercargill.Bottom of the South Island New Zealand .Zone 9--Maritime climate .1100mm rainfall PA.

rob krejzl

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Re: Lilium species
« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2008, 07:46:58 PM »
Dave,

I've had this and lankongense spear out of the side of poly boxes, so moving is probably a good idea just on general grounds.
Southern Tasmania

USDA Zone 8/9

 

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