We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Lilium species  (Read 80512 times)

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16309
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #60 on: May 12, 2009, 09:50:18 PM »
Are you not able to buy imported spaghnum Jamie? Spaghnum is protected here too tho' a small group of west coasters (South Island) are permitted to take a certain amount each year from a particular area where it grows very fast and regenerates annually. This is dried and exported to many countries for hort purposes. We can buy it dried in small bags and I am lucky to have a little bit growing under my shelter trees, enough for the Pleione pots and my few little Pinguiculas and a few other things.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Regelian

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 943
  • Country: de
  • waking escapes the dream
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #61 on: May 12, 2009, 10:11:04 PM »
Lesley,

one would think so, but I've never seen it offered in Germany.  There are other mosses that grow here, which may be usable, but I am wary of using anything collected, other than from my own garden.  Perlite is not easy to find, as well, as the typical stuff offered is contaminated with fire retardant, but keeping ones eyes open (or a trip over to Britain) solves the problem.  I've learned to find substitutes for just about everything over the years.
Jamie Vande
Cologne
Germany

Luc Gilgemyn

  • VRV President & Channel Hopper
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5509
  • Country: be
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #62 on: May 13, 2009, 09:34:07 AM »

Jamie,
Some orchid growers sell Spaghnum.
I also had trouble finding it, but Wubben Orchids in Holland (North of Utrecht) sells some on a regular basis.

http://www.orchidwubben.com/

 
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

bendgardener

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • long winters and short summers
    • Bend Gardener
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #63 on: October 15, 2011, 02:05:22 AM »
I live in the Central Oregon Cascades and just collected 12 seed pods form L. washingtonianum, from a neighbors property.   Any advice on when and how to properly sow the seed?  Also does is normally germinate in one season or should I expect germination over several seasons? 

Thanks

Bob
Bob Crain

elevation 4750 feet in Central Oregon Cascades
zone 5

Tony Willis

  • Wandering Star
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3207
  • Country: england
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #64 on: October 15, 2011, 07:15:20 PM »
Fox's 'Growing Lilies' says it has hypogeal germination,germinating in late autumn in cool conditions and so I think it should be sown straightaway and expect to see growth above ground in the spring. I would not let the pots be frozen hard.
Chorley, Lancashire zone 8b

gote

  • still going down the garden path...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1596
  • A fact is a fact - even if it is an unusual fact
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #65 on: October 22, 2011, 11:50:51 AM »
Western Lilies have a similar two stage germination cycle as the eastern and the martagons. They differ, however, in that the first low temperature period should be around 10 degrees C rather than 4 C.
Göte   
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

gote

  • still going down the garden path...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1596
  • A fact is a fact - even if it is an unusual fact
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #66 on: October 22, 2011, 12:00:27 PM »
Re Sphagnum,
The situation is very different in different countries.
Our worst rodent that makes most damage in gardens in Sweden is protected in the UK.
Reed (Phragmites) is an obnoxious weed here - and protected in Germany.
Heracleum is considered a dangerous weed - I tried it once and it died the second winter.
We have any amount of sphagnum growing wild here and to protect it would be as useful as protecting the pines and firs in our forests. Even more is available east of the Baltic. If there is a true demand for the stuff it should be easy for someone to start exporting.
Cheers
Göte
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

Gene Mirro

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 386
  • Country: us
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #67 on: December 09, 2011, 07:31:20 PM »
Bendgardener, see the attached file for germinating NW native lilies.
Gene Mirro from the magnificent state of Washington

gote

  • still going down the garden path...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1596
  • A fact is a fact - even if it is an unusual fact
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #68 on: December 12, 2011, 08:33:21 AM »
An excellent description Gene. Thank you very much.
I agree absolutely that it is preferably not to transplant the "microbulbs". 
Many of us receive our seed from seed exchanges which means that we have them in February.
I assume that the period at 40-45°F is the chilling period after bulb formation. That can easily take place in the fridge (If other family members allow)
However the previous bulb formation period is difficult to achieve outside when the temperature is at subzero degrees (as is the case in February my place).
I have seen three months at 50°F recommended. What is your idea about that?
Does your warning against lower temperatures than 28°F apply also to the mature plant? If so it would explain my poor results with the western species.
Cheers
Göte


 
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

Gene Mirro

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 386
  • Country: us
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #69 on: December 22, 2011, 08:18:33 PM »
Gote, I don't know the exact requirements for the cool temperature treatment.  I would give the seeds at least one month at roughly 60F.  Maybe 3 months at 50F would also work; I don't know.  If they don't come up the first spring, leave them in the pots, and don't let them dry out.  They will probably come up the second spring after sowing.

I don't usually sow seed from the exchange right away.  I store it in the freezer and wait for the right time to sow it the next fall.

Cold hardiness of western species:  I have heard that western US species don't do well in cold climates.  But I have no direct experience.  Maybe you should ask about this on the Yahoo Lilium group.  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Lilium/
Gene Mirro from the magnificent state of Washington

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2372
  • Country: gb
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #70 on: June 17, 2012, 05:33:42 PM »
I'm so pleased, I grew this L. mackliniae hybrid from seed sown in 2008.  It has flowered for the first time this year.  Two shots of it from different angles.
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

David Pilling

  • Computer Guru
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 464
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #71 on: June 17, 2012, 06:55:45 PM »
very nice Chris. I have tried L. Mc. a few times and failed...
David Pilling at the seaside in North West England.

gote

  • still going down the garden path...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1596
  • A fact is a fact - even if it is an unusual fact
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #72 on: June 18, 2012, 04:04:54 PM »
Really goodlooking Chris!
I hope my seedlings from darker varities will be as good.
The winter was bad here and I lost my maclinaes which have flowered every year since 2006.  :'(
A couple of seedlings which were growing in a different place seems to have survived.  :)
I also lost my formosanum which I got by mistake but which flowered since 2008.
Cheers
Göte
 
Göte Svanholm
Mid-Sweden

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2372
  • Country: gb
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #73 on: June 19, 2012, 11:15:50 AM »
Gote - if my L. formosanum flowers again this year (it has done for the past 6-8 yrs) I could save you some seed if you like.  Its a very strong plant and has a good sized flower.  I got my L. mackliniae seed from the exchange in 2008.  The others in the pot have yet to flower, perhaps next year, then I'll know if they are uniform...
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

ichristie

  • Former President
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Country: scotland
Re: Lilium species
« Reply #74 on: June 21, 2012, 04:27:10 PM »
Hello Chris, your Lilium mackliniae is probably the dark form collected by Peter Cox and is now named Naga Pink really nice, cheers Ian the Christie kind.
Ian ...the Christie kind...
from Kirriemuir

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942