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Author Topic: 2008/Log 4  (Read 12362 times)

ashley

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2008/Log 4
« on: February 15, 2008, 11:09:23 AM »
Thanks for another excellent log Paul.  Apart from the beautiful plants and photographs I particularly enjoy your detailed descriptions of culture conditions and experience. 

Regarding surface sowing, I realised only belatedly  :-[ that Celmisia respond to light activation so now live in hope of success at last.  Are there any general rules to help identify species needing light for germination?
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

David Nicholson

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2008, 07:24:33 PM »
As usual Paul both informative and covetable! I hope you keep some plants back so I have something to see when I visit Wisley on 17 March ;D
David Nicholson
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Paul Cumbleton

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2008, 09:16:53 AM »
Hi Ashley,
Thanks for your kind comments.
I'm afraid there are no rules that would guide you to knowing which seed need light for germination and which ones don't. The only general guide I use is to always sow very fine seed on the surface - but this is not infallible. Otherwise it's a case of searching the literature, the web and asking for the experience of others to find out about any particular type. There is quite a lot of information out there, it's just a case of pulling it together. Perhaps someone could do us all a great service and start a new topic just for this subject and ask everyone to add whatever information they have about which seeds need light - the aim being to end up with a single alphabetical list? Of course one major problem is that most of the research has been done on seed that has commercial value, not the esoteric things we like to play with!

Cheers

Paul
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Paul Cumbleton

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2008, 09:17:31 AM »
Hi David,
If you are visiting Wisley on Mar 17th there is good news and there is bad news - the bad news is that the Alpine House will be closed that day (and on the 18th, and possibly also on the 19th). This is because the special display of hepaticas that runs from the 8th to the 16th will be being dismantled starting on the 17th and the usual general display of mixed alpines reinstated. However, if you come through the gate at the end of the hedge opposite the alpine house (which says private) and come to the potting shed and ask for me, I would be happy to spend a little time and show you around behind the scenes, so you will still be able to see everything.

Cheers

Paul
Paul Cumbleton, Somerton, Somerset, U.K. Zone 8b (U.S. system plant hardiness zone)

I occasionally sell spare plants on ebay -
see http://ebay.eu/1n3uCgm

http://www.pleione.info/

art600

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2008, 12:11:01 PM »
David

If you have not been 'behind the hedge' at Wisley, this is something not to be missed.

Arthur Nicholls

Anything bulbous    North Kent

David Nicholson

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 08:44:02 PM »
Hi David,
If you are visiting Wisley on Mar 17th there is good news and there is bad news - the bad news is that the Alpine House will be closed that day (and on the 18th, and possibly also on the 19th). This is because the special display of hepaticas that runs from the 8th to the 16th will be being dismantled starting on the 17th and the usual general display of mixed alpines reinstated. However, if you come through the gate at the end of the hedge opposite the alpine house (which says private) and come to the potting shed and ask for me, I would be happy to spend a little time and show you around behind the scenes, so you will still be able to see everything.

Cheers

Paul

It's an age thing Paul, I got my date wrong! We are at Wisley on 13th March not the 17th but if you are available on the 13th I would really welcome a look behind the scenes.
David Nicholson
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Paul Cumbleton

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2008, 07:59:30 AM »
David, the 13th should be OK.

Paul
Paul Cumbleton, Somerton, Somerset, U.K. Zone 8b (U.S. system plant hardiness zone)

I occasionally sell spare plants on ebay -
see http://ebay.eu/1n3uCgm

http://www.pleione.info/

jamouatt

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2008, 06:24:03 PM »
Does any one know of a source for these deep square plastic pots?
John(M). in Bedfordshire

Maggi Young

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2008, 08:09:54 PM »
There is some talk of sources for square pots here: http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=641.msg15016;topicseen#msg15016
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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David Nicholson

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2008, 08:52:00 PM »
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Maggi Young

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2008, 08:59:41 PM »
Yes, thanks, David, I missed that!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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afw

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2008, 10:54:18 PM »
It is difficult to buy the longer pots.

Perhaps Paul at Wisley could help?
Alan Whybrow, late of mighty Sawbo, now in Belper, Derbyshire

Paul Cumbleton

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2008, 10:41:56 AM »
The longer pots are hard to get hold of for general gardeners as they are usually only sold by suppliers who sell to the professional horticultural trade. Even if you do find somewhere that will let you order, they usually only want to supply them by the case load - which may mean buying 1000 or more pots at a time, which is not much use. Amateurs usually adopt one of two options in trying to get hold of things like this - if they have friends who are in the trade, they can ask them to let them have a few out of their supply. Or join a local horticultural society who often are able to buy in bulk to sell on to their members.

I'm afraid it has to be said that I think the amateur gardening market is extremely poorly served by the horticultural industry - they only make available a very limited range of goods of all kinds compared to what is available to professionals. Just to give a few of many possible examples, as a professional I can buy at least six different grades of peat (compared to one supplied for amateurs), seven grades of bark, five grades of perlite, 3 grades of vermiculite...and when it comes to pots there is virtualy an unlimited range of sizes, shapes, colours made from a range of differing materials. Compare all that to what you can buy at the garden centre! I guess it is all down to money and what they think they can make a good profit selling. But it is sad, because it means many excellent products are simply not available to amateurs and they are often offered only low quality alternatives in a very limited range.

So in the end, the advice has to be to befriend a nurseryman or join a local society, both of which may have access to commercial suppliers. Sorry there is no easier way!
Paul
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I occasionally sell spare plants on ebay -
see http://ebay.eu/1n3uCgm

http://www.pleione.info/

jamouatt

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2008, 11:20:11 AM »
Thanks for the links but they don't seem to be of the deep square variety though. The only one I can Google up is www.hartcanna.com/pots.htm where the smallest is 100x100x170 but costs £35/100.  Roger @ Ivycroft let me have a few last week but I gather his source has gone too. I am told that most of the current deep pots suffer from indents at the bottom which encourage slugs etc. The hartcanna ones are good in this respect. I guess I will have to go this route until I can accomplish Paul’s advice.

I envy Paul being able to get all those bark products, I used GEM Composted Bark until it was withdrawn from the garden centre trade in December (company change of hands I understand). I found it was much finer than the competition and used it everywhere.

I use the Essentials company’s black plant labels too but mark them with a Burgess vibrating engraver (£6 off Ebay). [one of the links]

John.M

PS  Maggi “Snowdrops” arrived this morning from Pickabook, again well packaged, very happy at under £36 delivered.
John(M). in Bedfordshire

art600

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Re: 2008/Log 4
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2008, 02:58:14 PM »
Paul

Are you very friendly?

I am sure that a considerable number of the members of the Cyclamen Society or the Fritillaria Group would welcome you ordering a batch on their behalf.  I would be willing to underwrite such an order.
Arthur Nicholls

Anything bulbous    North Kent

 

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