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Author Topic: my local patch and wildlife - Ian McDonald  (Read 54666 times)

ian mcdonald

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Re: my local patch and wildlife - Ian McDonald
« Reply #720 on: December 04, 2019, 10:11:01 PM »
Thanks for your input David. I don,t use flash either as I prefer natural light, even in poor light conditions. I have in the past used flash and found the results poor. I should be on the site again tomorrow and will look for fruiting Cladonia to see if the results are the same.

David Lyttle

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Re: my local patch and wildlife - Ian McDonald
« Reply #721 on: December 05, 2019, 07:58:40 AM »
Thanks for your input David. I don,t use flash either as I prefer natural light, even in poor light conditions. I have in the past used flash and found the results poor. I should be on the site again tomorrow and will look for fruiting Cladonia to see if the results are the same.

Sorry I misread the metadata details that are embedded in your image; it says your flash was off and did not fire but your white balance setting was for flash which would explain why the colours were not rendered correctly.

So much for my original theory.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ian mcdonald

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Re: my local patch and wildlife - Ian McDonald
« Reply #722 on: December 05, 2019, 08:16:17 PM »
Thanks David. I don,t know how to look at the details in the image unless it,s on the camera. I will have to look at the camera manual to see how to alter the white balance.
Today was dull with a cold wind after six days of sun and frost. I was late on site and my usual companion had met the site manager and gone to the south of the site. I met up with them about mid-day. We walked through the flooded main track, the water was about eight inches deep in some places. Birds were keeping out of the exposed areas most of the time. We saw a female marsh harrier hunting over the reed beds. A group of birds were flitting about in the tops of birch trees and I thought they were redpolls. We stopped in the shelter of some reeds for a hot drink and heard a buzzard calling. Fieldfare and redwing were eating hawthorn berries along the main track. We also noticed several small fish swimming along the track, in deep water. Both the old and "new" pumps were working but we have had so much rain in the last three months that little effect is noticeable in the water levels so far. A party of long tailed tits were seen in the bushes along the track. These groups of tits are worth taking the time to look at as other small birds join them in winter. We made our way to our usual advantage point where we can scan a large area for birds. Soon after arriving two cormorants flew past. Three roe deer were seen grazing not far away. As it was getting dusk a short eared owl appeared near by.



Polytrichum commune?



A winter scene on one of the tracks.







The flooded main track.

The site is dismal looking in winter with dull skies and the vegetation has lost its summer green-ness. We have to be well wrapped up with several layers of warm clothing, coats, hats, scarves and gloves but it is still much better than sitting at home looking at the walls. You never know what you are going to see and maybe come across un-common wildlife.

Birds today were, reed bunting, blackbird, marsh harrier, crow, mallard, redpoll, buzzard, starling, fieldfare, redwing, long tailed tit, blue tit, wren, cormorant, short eared owl and snipe.

 

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