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Author Topic: The plant world of Patagonia  (Read 24266 times)

Leucogenes

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The plant world of Patagonia
« on: March 17, 2017, 09:11:28 PM »
In addition to my obsession for the alpine flora of New Zealand, I am thrilled by spectacular plants of the Patagonian Andes.
These are often still archaic but very difficult in keeping and cultivating. I already had some very rare species, but often not very long. I will soon build an area with better conditions. In the hope that there are some specialists for these plants, I therefore open this new topic. I hope I get some tips on the attitude here.

I was inspired to this topic today, because today I could get very nice South Americans with my friend Gerd Stopp. Most are not on his list.

I'll start with today's highlight ...

Viola dasyphylla

Best regards
Thomas

... as always ... sorry for my english

Hoy

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2017, 10:24:48 PM »
Hi Thomas

I really hope you are able to grow the Viola dasyphylla!

Here is a plant from Patagonia:


Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2017, 08:58:55 AM »
A great shot. You probably already had the pleasure to be there? Then you can show more pictures. You do not get so often to see what.

I guess the joy of this little diva will not last long. It is probably very difficult in the attitude. There are for example some Nassauvia species with me somewhat more durable ... until now.  ;) Do you also cultivate some South Americans?

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2017, 01:40:52 PM »
.... because I currently have nothing blooming from Patagonia, I show here something special from the last year. On one of my many visits to Gerd Stopp, I was lucky enough to photograph a blossoming Leucheria hahnii. She is one of the best South Americans for me. Unfortunately he has lost all of them. I got two copies of him. One still lives. :)

Martin Sheader

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2017, 07:37:24 PM »
Viola dasyphylla is a real gem and I hope you succeed with it. In the wild it forms tight mats or low cushions. I have grown this several times and flowered it once. It tends to etiolate in cultivation and needs high light. I think it might be worth trying additional lighting to keep them in character, though I have yet to try this. I have some V. dasyphylla germinating at the moment from seed sown in 2008 - I have had a few seedling every year from the same pot since 2009.
In the wild this species shows some variation in flower shape, size and body colour - usually white occasionally creamy yellow. At the north of their range rosettes become progressively tinier making the flowers appear relatively large.

Maggi Young

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2017, 07:48:15 PM »
Thomas- if I may introduce Martin Sheader to you - he and his wife Anna-Liisa  have travelled extensively in South America - also leading tours there - and is the author of 'Flowers of the Patagonian Mountains'  - he  is also one of the most successful growers in the UK of these plants.  :)
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Hoy

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2017, 09:14:58 PM »
A great shot. You probably already had the pleasure to be there? Then you can show more pictures. You do not get so often to see what.

I guess the joy of this little diva will not last long. It is probably very difficult in the attitude. There are for example some Nassauvia species with me somewhat more durable ... until now.  ;) Do you also cultivate some South Americans?

Thomas, I have been in Patagonia once and I had the pleasure of meeting the Sheaders in Argentina. They probably don't remember me but I remember them! I have the book which Maggi mentions and it has been very useful to me.

I do not grow many plants from South America as they dislike the coastal climate here. I prefer to grow plants in the garden and not in a glass house.


Here is a nice Nassauvia revoluta (I think) from Neuquen, Argentina.

568094-0


....and an unknown Leucheria(?)

568096-1


Does anybody grow Oreopolus glacialis?

568098-2
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Michael J Campbell

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2017, 09:54:20 PM »
Junellia coralloides
« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 02:44:58 PM by Michael J Campbell »

Michael J Campbell

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2017, 10:00:48 PM »
Benthamiella patagonica.

Martin Sheader

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2017, 11:19:10 PM »
Michael, we described your junellia a couple of years ago - it is now Junellia coralloides. It seems to be doing quite well in cultivation and has appeared at shows in the south of England. In the wild the the coral like growth can seem almost dead at flowering (see images below).
The Leucheria pictures is Leucheria candidissima.
Oreopolus glacialis is a plant that should be growable. It is found in a range of habitats, from steppe to mountain slopes and exposed ridges. There are a few people trying to grow this species in the UK at the moment. Germination of seed is good if fresh seed is used, and germination occurs in spring following an autumn sowing. Growth is slow and again, good light is needed. We have flowered it once - poorly.

Hoy

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2017, 11:47:58 AM »
.....

The Leucheria pictures is Leucheria candidissima.
Oreopolus glacialis is a plant that should be growable. It is found in a range of habitats, from steppe to mountain slopes and exposed ridges. There are a few people trying to grow this species in the UK at the moment. Germination of seed is good if fresh seed is used, and germination occurs in spring following an autumn sowing. Growth is slow and again, good light is needed. We have flowered it once - poorly.

Thanks. I wondered whether it could be a L candidissima but wasn't sure.
I also noticed Oreopolus from several different location and that's why I thought it might be growable even here.
Trond Hoy, gardening on the rainy west coast of Norway.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2017, 09:11:02 PM »
Thomas- if I may introduce Martin Sheader to you - he and his wife Anna-Liisa  have travelled extensively in South America - also leading tours there - and is the author of 'Flowers of the Patagonian Mountains'  - he  is also one of the most successful growers in the UK of these plants.  :)


Maggi ... thank you for the information about Mr. Sheader. I am very pleased that I receive advice on this topic from such a well-known specialist.
I have countless questions.

Also best thanks for the reference to this book. I will try to buy it as soon as possible.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2017, 09:28:24 PM »
I am very happy about the resonance on this topic. The photos shown are all indescribably beautiful.

As already said ... I have already lost some "South American" and would like to devote myself intensively to these jewels in the future.

At first, I would be happy about the confirmation or correction of different specimens that are still alive.

Draba antactica from Mt.Leon
Azorella madreporica from La Hoya,Esquel
Azorella ameghinoi
Xerodraba pectinata

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2017, 09:35:46 PM »
...dann habe ich noch Nassauvia revoluta.

Leucogenes

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Re: The plant world of Patagonia
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2017, 10:00:06 PM »
Very resistant is with me Nassauvia pygmaea and Nassauvia juniperifolia .
If someone noticed a mistake ... I am very grateful for every correction.

 

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