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Author Topic: Glaucidium palmatum  (Read 3875 times)

P. Kohn

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Glaucidium palmatum
« on: February 12, 2018, 01:15:04 PM »
I notice quite a bit of correspondence on the forum about growing this species. The most recent from 2016 reported plenty of seedlings and was expressing concern only about the delay in producing true leaves but we just cannot get primary germination. Ten years ago we had no problems at Kerrachar (NW Scotland) but here in Sheffield we consistently fail despite obtaining seed from a variety of sources. Our technique is fundamentally the same though there are obvious differences of aspect and, perhaps, temperature (although mean January temperature is almost identical).

Does anyone have any suggestions on improving germination rate. (We have high success rates with the majority of what we sow but this species is eluding us.)

KK-Ann Arbor

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2018, 02:04:26 PM »
I am not an expert grower.  My past attempt with Glaucidium palmatum is very limited and currently do not have any result to show.  However, I did have germination.

A SRGC friend of mine who lives in Hokkaido, Japan sent me a variety of fresh seeds (mauve, white, white semi double, dark blue, dark blue double) a few years ago. 
I rember keeping the pot with seeds in dark.  Someone suggested the use of GA3 and I did try it on some but not all.

Even though I did get germination in multiple number of pots, I could not keep them alive, as I had to travel for about 2 weeks and I found them gone when I came back home.
I shared the seeds with several members of my rock garden group, who were far more experienced gardeners than I and hope they might have them going farther than I did.

I would die for another chance to try but so ashamed to beg for more with my poor treatment of those precious seeds.

Wish you good luck.
in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - USDA Zone 5a

Carolyn

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2018, 03:27:09 PM »
I notice quite a bit of correspondence on the forum about growing this species. The most recent from 2016 reported plenty of seedlings and was expressing concern only about the delay in producing true leaves but we just cannot get primary germination. Ten years ago we had no problems at Kerrachar (NW Scotland) but here in Sheffield we consistently fail despite obtaining seed from a variety of sources. Our technique is fundamentally the same though there are obvious differences of aspect and, perhaps, temperature (although mean January temperature is almost identical).

Does anyone have any suggestions on improving germination rate. (We have high success rates with the majority of what we sow but this species is eluding us.)
Fresh seed rather than dry from the seed exchanges gives better results. My main problem with them is slugs!
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

GordonT

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2018, 05:14:08 PM »
I followed the advice of Kristl Walek... soaking the seeds in a weak solution of GA3, sowing in a community pot, and watering them in with the remaining solution for good measure. The seed pots were kept at warm temperature in sun. They germinated in less than a month, if I remember correctly, and the resulting seedlings bloomed for the first time last spring.
Southwestern Nova Scotia,
Zone 6B or above , depending on the year.

TheOnionMan

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2018, 05:23:27 PM »
I had fresh seed of the white form sent to me in 2012. Spring 2013 had some germination, but less than 50%. Late spring 2017 the plants flowers, 5-years from seed, all where white but also got a blue one.

The pods are fascinating, looking like a pair of guppies joined at the tail, waxy and shiny. The pods take a very long time to ripen, I collected seed on Sept 12 2017, almost 3 months after pods formed, all was sown fresh. I saved & sowed seed from the single blue plant too. We'll see what germination occurs this spring, my flats stay outside all winter.
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com

KK-Ann Arbor

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2018, 06:29:54 PM »
Beutiful white flower!
in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - USDA Zone 5a

Lesley Cox

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2018, 11:06:20 PM »
I agree Carolyn, fresh is best. I had a single pod (they come in attached pairs) this last spring (but it was very dry when it was in flower) on my one flowering purple plant and that ripened two weeks ago and the seeds were sown right away so I expect them to germinate in our autumn, in about 2 months. The white which for me flowers a couple of weeks later than the purple, has a lot of pods and is still showing no sign of browning then opening. Could be even another 3 or 4 weeks by the look of it. I find that if sown right away they germinate well, the first true leaves coming perhaps 3 or 4 weeks after the cotyledons.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Leena

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2018, 08:49:57 AM »
I find that if sown right away they germinate well, the first true leaves coming perhaps 3 or 4 weeks after the cotyledons.

This is a mystery, perhaps it depends on conditions. Here the seeds ripen in early October and cold may come in Novermber and December, so there is not much warm for the seeds. I have sown many times fresh Glaucidium palmatum seeds from my own plants and the first spring I get about third of them germinating, and after the second winter the rest germinate. Only once I have failed to germinate Glaucidium, and they were dry seeds from Japan sown in January.

Does anyone have any suggestions on improving germination rate.

If you want I can send you fresh seeds of G.palmatum var leucanthemum next autumn? I think I have also some one year old seedlings which I could send you in the spring. ;)
Leena from south of Finland

P. Kohn

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2018, 11:20:13 AM »
Many thanks for the helpful comments. For the record, our success at Kerrachar was, we think, with normal winter sowing and we got plants into flower, again from memory, after three years. Last time we visited Kerrachar they were still thriving in a shady bed which seems not to have been invaded by weeds in the way the open parts of the garden have been.

ArdfearnAli

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2018, 11:01:40 AM »
Hello I have an old large plant which I have had for years but it never sets any seed at all? I have tried hand pollinating but no results. It has very large lilac purple flowers usually around 4" or more across. Not sure if the plant requires a separate pollinator or perhaps mine is sterile/triploid?. I hope to try and remove a few bits from around the edge in late Feb and try to grow them on. Will post if I have success this year. I have tried before and had no luck with keeping them going. They seem to start into growth and then give up. Its very annoying as it is a particularly good form and in full view so anybody who sees it in flower instantly wants it!

Alasdair

pfirsich48

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2018, 11:37:29 AM »
I have several mature clumps growing under a Oak tree that, after a few years began self seeding prolifically.  My soil here is a silt loam with a neutral to slightly caustic pH.  The seedlings show only cotyledons the entire first year and develop a single true leaf the second, by the fourth year they are blooming.  I have also tried germinating seed in pots with limited success, I suspect due to my inconsistent  attention.  I have tried as suggested by Alplians sewing the seed on edge and that seemed to give better germination although I have been informed by a friendly nursery owner that that is total nonsense.  My plants produce seed abundantly and I usually contribute them in quantity to the NARGs SeedEx.

Unfortunately the white form has not exhibited these same desirable characteristics of self seeding and ease of germination

Leena

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2018, 08:24:53 AM »
Also I have two plants growing close to each other and they produce seeds well. Maybe one plant is not enough for pollination?
I haven't divided my plants, but if I do it, I would do it in late summer/autumn like with peonies, which don't like to to divided in spring.
Leena from south of Finland

kris

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2018, 08:29:15 PM »
I had the  Glaucidium palmatum album for 3 years. It was a nice clump. But last year harsh fluctuations of spring temperature killed it. I had some seedlings of the mauve one in a pot also died last winter.
From my experience  fresh seeds sowed outside in winter germinated  next spring.  But now I don't have either of them.
Saskatoon,Canada
-35C to +30C

Gabriela

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2018, 01:30:44 AM »
This is a very interesting and useful discussion.
Considering what Lesley said, I understand now why some sowing recommendation seem contradictory - I think Glaucidium, like other Ranunculaceae, germinate at warm if sown right away and if not, will require one or two cold periods (combined double dormancy).

Like in Leena's case, here (Ontario) the fruits don't mature till late fall so it's not possible to germinate it at warm right away.

I only try it with GA3 under lights indoors (nothing weak - 1000 ppm) and the germination was excellent. The seedlings remained at cotyledon leaves stage and went dormant - at that point I thought them dead so took some out of pots - took pictures, realized they were OK, potted them back...Second season they spent time under lights again for a while because I kept them in the garage over winter and they wanted to grow.
I will att. few pictures; also to note that they are easy to transplant when dormant (or almost).

With GA3 treatment, seeds of 2 and 3 years old will germinate as well but in lower percentage. And indeed, the seedlings are not always true to colour with the parents. I will sow a new batch later towards spring and show the germination when will happen.
Kris - check your pm please.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

P. Kohn

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Re: Glaucidium palmatum
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2018, 01:10:36 PM »
Many thanks for the feedback. Really useful suggestions.

 

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