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Linn Botanic Gardens,

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Maggi Young:
Linn Botanic Gardens
Linn Botanic Gardens are situated at the head of Cove Bay on the west side of Rosneath peninsula. Over the water to the south are the hills of Arran and to the west the hills of the Cowal peninsula.
The development of the present gardens dates from 1970 and they now house a diverse collection of temperate plants. Features include a burn with waterfalls, formal and informal ponds, an open heath for New Zealand plants and a collection of insect catching plants. The centre of the gardens is dominated by a substantial cliff enabling fine views over much of the plantings. Among the more notable collections are ferns, bamboos, Magnolias and Rhododendrons.

Getting there:
From Loch Lomond take A817 to Coulport via Whistlefield roundabout. Then follow loch-side road to Cove. From Arrochar take A814 to Whistlefield roundabout then take Coulport road. Then follow loch-side road to Cove.

FACILITIES: Guided tours and parties by arrangement. Plants for sale.

(From:   www.gardens-of-argyll.co.uk/view-details.php?id=491)



Contact Information
Opening Dates:
1st January - 31st December
Opening Times:
Seasonal opening hours, please phone for details
Contact:    Jim Taggart
Tel:    01436 842242
Email:    Jimtaggartroot5@gmail.com

Address:    Cove, By Helensburgh, Argyll, G84 0NR

Maggi Young:
Scotland off the beaten track

Thousands of exciting places, walks & hidden gems helping you plan your holidays in Scotland


"Fans of perfectly tended, formal gardens look away now... Linn Botanic Gardens on the peaceful Rosneath Peninsula may have been immaculate once upon a time, but more recently nature seems to have had the upper hand. But there's still beauty in these bushes if you're patient enough to overlook overgrown paths and untidy borders. A map leaflet (usually available upon arrival) and 50 numbered waymarkers guide you around the varied landscape, taking in a glen and waterfall, bamboo garden, ponds, Alpine lawn and rhododendron plantings surrounding a dilapidated old villa, though following the correct route isn't always straightforward. It's a refreshing from the heavily manicured gardens elsewhere in Scotland - but you can't help thinking another set of green fingers might transform the place."

June 2018

https://www.sobt.co.uk/2018/06/linn-botanic-gardens.html?spref=fb&fbclid=IwAR1Uoc0F7cegP6yh6x97sZ4Qd3u5ZPYaGx8hhoOqdaXAkUiZ-FlTsGYAmAo







As can be deduced from the article cited, the Linn is in need of  more care than is  possible  at the moment....
It is hard to keep up such a large collection of plants almost single handed. We suspect that volunteers who could help out with practical work - repairs to gates, on paths, steps etc. would be welcome. This would free up skilled garden helpers to concentrate on their specialist work. At the moment perhaps not a garden for large group visits - but not one that should be missed for individual visitors or small groups.

Maggi Young:
 Linn Botanic Gardens: A Scottish Arcadia in pictures

A hidden gem on the shores of Loch Long, Linn Botanic Gardens is a haven for almost 4,000 species of plant; a magical place where the air seems almost green. The writer Philip Hoare takes us on a tour of this ecological marvel....

"In 2011, the artist Alison Turnbull  ( https://www.alison-turnbull.com/  )   invited me to visit a remarkable, hidden botanic garden on the Rosneath peninsula, overshadowed by the mountains of western Scotland, and surrounded by the deep waters of Loch Long and Gare Loch, at the mouth of the former industrial waterway of the Firth of Clyde."

Philip Hoare
Oct 2015

https://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2015/oct/15/linn-botanic-gardens-scottish-in-pictures-philip-hoare?fbclid=IwAR3JwowTs83UWDHuXCwnUXIm-DEytxrkWt4nDoHvF9uEAckmZLznIURUMFY

johnralphcarpenter:
Its wonderful, but he isn't getting any younger and it must be a real challenge to maintain the place.

Maggi Young:
Yes, Ralph, as can be deduced from  one of the articles cited, the Linn is in need of  more care than is  possible  at the moment....
It is hard to keep up such a large collection of plants almost single handed. We suspect that volunteers who could help out with practical work - repairs to gates, on paths, steps etc. would be welcome. This would free up skilled garden helpers to concentrate on their specialist work. At the moment perhaps not a garden for large group visits - but not one that should be missed for individual visitors or small groups.

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