We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata  (Read 2303 times)

arisaema

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Country: cn
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2018, 02:29:22 AM »
Peaty soil comes from the moor, how can there be peat without a moor? Why is the clay red, does it contain iron?

Humus based would probably have been more correct, but in cultivation that basically equals peat. There's a lot of wetlands with "peaty, black muck" and small Rhododendrons, and the grasslands where a lot of the plants we cultivate are found also consist of a similar thin layer of sapric soil on top of clay.
Balcony gardener in Chengdu, Sichuan, USDA zone 9
ChineseAlpines.com - Wild collected seeds and cultivated bulbs from China

Steve Garvie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1449
  • Country: scotland
    • Rainbirder's photostream
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2018, 09:09:35 AM »
At no level could I be considered a competent grower (read this to the background music of “Send in the Clowns”), nor do I have any knowledge whatsoever of these plants in their natural habitat but I would venture this. If you try to grow these plants in a close copy of their natural soil conditions in a lowland garden they will be dead in no time. Using a soil mix with a high organic content simply encourages fungal rots to which most high altitude Sinohimalayan plants have no resistance. I have more success by using soil mixtures which are 80%+ inorganic using materials that result in a high air-filled porosity (perlite, pumice, baked Moler clay) -especially if the plants are pot-grown. I find soil pH to be less important but plants from limestone areas do well with added dolomitic lime whilst calcifuges do best with added coarse silica sand/grit or granite). Plenty of moisture flowing past the roots is good but it is better to keep the top-growth dry at the start and end of their growing season. Try to keep these plants cold (but not frozen-through if in pots) and dry in Winter. In my climate full exposure to sun and wind whilst in growth produces harder, more compact plants. Beware of greenfly -especially on new growth of Cremanthodium and Hegemone.

If you want to grow these plants at sea level then move to Tromsř.  ;)
https://en.uit.no/tmu/aktuelt?p_document_id=576165
WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

arisaema

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Country: cn
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2018, 10:21:37 AM »
Steve has a very good point, I've only tried groing them in Norway (far south, so in line with the northernmost of Scotland), but where summers are warmer you will have to adjust your mix. I did grow Cremanthodium campanulatum in a peat bed where it appeared to seem perfectly content, but that species grows in soggy conditions in pure humus in the wild.
Balcony gardener in Chengdu, Sichuan, USDA zone 9
ChineseAlpines.com - Wild collected seeds and cultivated bulbs from China

Lesmona

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: de
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2018, 10:53:09 PM »
Steve has a very good point, I've only tried groing them in Norway (far south, so in line with the northernmost of Scotland), but where summers are warmer you will have to adjust your mix. I did grow Cremanthodium campanulatum in a peat bed where it appeared to seem perfectly content, but that species grows in soggy conditions in pure humus in the wild.

Thanks Steve,

yes, I use only a mineral mix for my himalayan plants too. I have had bad experiences with compost and peat. My first attempt with 10 plants of Rheum nobile failed. I planted them in compost. Of course there are no problems with that in the cool Himalayas, but apparently the winter and the wetness is the reason why the plants die here in Europe and not in the dried himalayan winter. My Rheum nobile plant gets mildew and root rot.  I use the fungizide "Alliette", it works good again root rot especially for young plants. I think the biggest evil is the heat. I am also like them, Africa is too hot for me too  ;D

My plants are in large pots in the garden. I protect it with sacks of leaves on the edge. On top of it are slices.



My soil is very acidic. I have a problem with moss and the common liverwort. What can I do against it?

Leucogenes

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 737
  • Country: de
  • ...keep on rockin in the free world
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2018, 11:15:51 AM »
Hi Steve

A few minutes ago I got the delivery from chinesalpines. There were also seeds of Cremanthodium decaisnei. Do I have to treat these seeds with GA3 acid...or can I look normal? I don't know anyone else who has such treasures...😊

On this way I would like to send my best greetings and wishes for Christmas to everyone here...especially of course to Maggi and the team.

Thomas

Steve Garvie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1449
  • Country: scotland
    • Rainbirder's photostream
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2018, 11:50:48 AM »
Merry Christmas Thomas,

I find that Cremanthodium seed is best sown as fresh as possible. The seed does not seem to be viable if stored for long periods but does not need GA3 treatment. Sow the seed now in a gritty well-drained compost. Germination occurs with rising Spring temperatures.

Our maritime winters here are getting milder but we still get intermittent hard frosts. This is a problem as a mild spell in January can encourage some seed to germinate -only for the seedlings to be killed by the next hard frost. Keeping the seed in a frost-free greenhouse is the way to go as long as you keep the seedlings cool (too warm they become leggy and prone to Botrytis).

The winter here has been mild so far and already I have had some Cyananthus and Himalayan Androsace seeds germinate.
WILDLIFE PHOTOSTREAM: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rainbirder/


Steve
West Fife, Scotland.

Leucogenes

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 737
  • Country: de
  • ...keep on rockin in the free world
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2018, 12:11:14 PM »
Merry Christmas to you, too... Steve.

Thank you for a quick and helpful answer. I will start the second round of this year's sowing season in the next few days. I don't think my place will be enough this year either. (Picture )🤔

 We also wait for colder temperatures here. At the moment it is relatively mild and very rainy. As soon as we have snow here, I cover the sowing with it. So in spring I simulate the snow melting. Works pretty well...

Best wishes
Thomas


Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41220
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Trollius lilacinus, Cremanthodium brunneopilosum, Saussurea involucrata
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2018, 12:39:47 PM »

On this way I would like to send my best greetings and wishes for Christmas to everyone here...especially of course to Maggi and the team.

Thomas

Thank you Thomas!  All best wishes  from Fred, Maggi and Ian
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

 

In Association with Amazon.co.uk


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942