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Author Topic: mistletoe  (Read 1203 times)

Catwheazle

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mistletoe
« on: January 11, 2019, 11:52:24 AM »
Hello, does anyone have seeds of mistletoe here?
They should - I believe - now sewn (glued to the branches)?
I have heard that they specialize in special trees. Have a decent size here but only apple tree, plum and pear tree.
Thank you!
Bernd
Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

François Lambert

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2019, 12:30:42 PM »
They grow on a wide variety of trees.  I see them rowing mstly on poplars & linden trees over here

see also my post earlier this year : http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=16075.msg387709#msg387709

I will check in the park if there are any fruits on the soil.
Bulboholic, but with moderation.

Catwheazle

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2019, 12:36:42 PM »
Great  ;D thx
Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

Ali Baba

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2019, 07:37:18 PM »
The seeds mature around late March to early April, at which point many will be starting to germinate inside the berry. Picking berries before then is likely to result in failure.
If sown when properly ripe viscum album is readily grown on apple. I managed about 50% establishment on an old apple tree on my allotment a few years ago, out of 50 seeds 'sown'.
I have also established mistletoe on an ornamental apple in my garden, although that proved more difficult. I have berries, if the birds leave any I'd be happy to send you a few in a couple of months.
Alternatively you can buy ripe berries on line, which is where I got mine from (it is commonest at the top of old lime trees around here so very difficult to collect!):
https://englishmistletoeshop.co.uk/live/

Catwheazle

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2019, 07:55:42 PM »
Many Thanks! Now I know why it never worked out in my attempts.
Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

François Lambert

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 12:05:59 PM »
OK, i went to the park and found already some fruits on the soil and picked these, but apparently that is still too early :-(

They are from a mistletoe growing on an old & almost dead apple tree.

Anyway, I go regularly the park to walk with the dog, so I will check towards the end of March if there are any fruits on the soil.  As you can see on the pic; close to this apple tree there are big linden trees covered with mistletoe, so there should be a good chance to find fruits there later this spring.



« Last Edit: January 14, 2019, 01:14:36 PM by Maggi Young »
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Catwheazle

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2019, 03:45:30 PM »
Oh, great :-) Many thanks ... also for the picture ;D
Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

brianw

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2019, 06:50:07 PM »
Apart from the date indication, can someone tell me what colour the seed are when ripe. I found a lot on the ground under a local tree. All very sticky of course but the seed are more green than brown. If I go back later any will be more difficult to find when the undergrowth has increased. Does the size of the seed tell me anything?
Another surprise was an Earth Star fungus in amongst them. That would have seemed a little out of season too for me? Must go back with a camera.
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

Catwheazle

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2019, 04:30:44 PM »
thanks to all for their help :-)

Bernd

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Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

Gail

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2019, 06:32:44 PM »
Amazing - I've not seen it at the germinating stage before.
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

AnJo11

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2019, 10:25:50 AM »
...me neither, and it makes me want to try ...

ashley

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2019, 10:42:21 AM »
Germinating here too, on apple, cotoneaster, oak, liquidamber and horse chestnut.
However I lost many seeds (50-70%), maybe to birds despite a wire sleeve or to slugs/snails.
I might try some more next year to ensure both female & male plants at each site.
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Catwheazle

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2019, 03:57:23 PM »
meanwhile connection to tree is made.
Think there will be no change till next spring.
Will update ...
Bernd

Si hortum in bibliotheca et canis malinoisia habes, deerit nihil. (Frei nach Cicero)

AnJo11

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2019, 12:34:36 AM »
wondrfull  ;) and very interesting.
I thought that the passage through the digestive system of birds was necessary for germination ...
this proves that the bird is only a vector, not a mandatory factor.

brianw

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Re: mistletoe
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2019, 12:35:09 PM »
This website has a lot of info.
http://mistletoe.org.uk/homewp/index.php/grow-your-own/

I have a male plant on an old apple tree in my garden (no berries) and the plant is very common in this area. Berries are usually well above 20' here but the birds drop them around the trunks in very early spring. By the time they are ripe it is very difficult to find them in the lush growth. Tried keeping early collected berries indoors but they die too quickly under any conditions I have tried so far. Did find an Earth Star fungus amongst them this year so worth the attempt.
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

 

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