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Author Topic: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 3284 times)

Yann

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2019, 10:32:23 PM »
despite the last rains it's still very dry in some parts
North of France

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2019, 12:10:17 PM »
Here are two North Americans who are blooming for the first time with me...

Gentiana newberryi var. newberryi
&
Lewisia rediviva

Robert

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2019, 05:07:21 PM »
Thomas

Your specimen of Gentiana newberryi var. newberryi looks nice. I generally see variety tiogana in our part of the Sierra Nevada. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains Gentiana newberryi blooms in the autumn. All the examples that I have seen in cultivation bloom late spring to early summer, including the plants I grow in our Sacramento garden. The species seems very easy to cultivate, but they seem to bloom much earlier than they do in the wild. Do you know the origin of your Gentiana newberryi?

I am always amazed how easily Lewisia rediviva is cultivated. Maybe the species is changing and adjusting to cultivation by unintended selection. First generation seedling from wild seed can be a bit finicky to grow at times and depending on where the seed was gathered.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2019, 05:13:15 PM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2019, 06:19:24 PM »
Thomas

Your specimen of Gentiana newberryi var. newberryi looks nice. I generally see variety tiogana in our part of the Sierra Nevada. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains Gentiana newberryi blooms in the autumn. All the examples that I have seen in cultivation bloom late spring to early summer, including the plants I grow in our Sacramento garden. The species seems very easy to cultivate, but they seem to bloom much earlier than they do in the wild. Do you know the origin of your Gentiana newberryi?

I am always amazed how easily Lewisia rediviva is cultivated. Maybe the species is changing and adjusting to cultivation by unintended selection. First generation seedling from wild seed can be a bit finicky to grow at times and depending on where the seed was gathered.

Hello Robert

Thanks for the kind words.
Unfortunately I do not know the exact origin of this Gentiana newberryi var. newberryi. I got this plant from the fantastic Scottish Ardfearn Nursery. Alasdair and Sarah have been supporting me for three years with generous gifts for my orders... for which I am infinitely grateful. But this plant was an official part of this year's catalogue. There was no name for the subspecies... so a surprise for me. Initially I was a little disappointed that it is not ssp. tiogana. Because I find these also very very beautiful. But after closer examination of the photo from this morning I like this form nevertheless very much. Because only with an enlargement I could recognize the fine dotting of the flower.

My Lewisia rediviva was cultivated from wild seeds from the Richter Pass near Osoyoos in the Okanagan area, near the border to Washington State. The germination rate was very good.
I have also achieved some young plants this year. In addition to the mentioned origin from Mt. Kobau, about 1000 meters above sea level. This is all the information I have. I am curious about the further development of both origins and will soon position them in the rock garden... before they retreat.

Greetings to California
Thomas

Robert

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2019, 06:30:22 PM »
Thomas,

Do not forget that Lewisia rediviva needs to stay completely dry during the summer and autumn months. The Lewis and Clark Expedition plant was carried bone dry for months before someone planted it back in the eastern U.S.A. somewhere. That is about all I can remember from this story, but this plant (root) was desiccated and came back to life when water was supplied. I even lose Lewisia rediviva here in dry California if I am not careful about keeping the plants dry, especially when going dormant. Basically they grow best with only rain water (no irrigation at all) for me here in California.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 12:27:06 AM by Robert »
Robert Barnard
Sacramento & Placerville, Northern California, U.S.A.
All text and photos © Robert Barnard

Gail

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2019, 11:53:46 PM »
Roscoea humeana x cautleoides 'Ice Maiden'
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2019, 09:02:08 PM »
Yesterday, to my great surprise, I noticed that all young plants of Silene hookeri var. bolanderi have formed flowers and some are already open. However, I did not sow them until 28.12.18.
As I have tried these species for the first time, I would be very grateful for all information on further cultivation.

Thanks...

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: June 16, 2019, 09:07:36 PM »
Robert...
 Many thanks for the information on the resting phase at Lewisia rediviva. I have already stopped watering and will now cover this plant.
I already knew about the absolute operation of the dryness... but thank you very much anyway. Exactly for that this forum is so infinitely valuable for me.  ;D

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: June 17, 2019, 07:44:21 AM »
Eriogonum ovalifolium var. nivale

ruweiss

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2019, 08:43:36 PM »
It is a pleasure to walk in the garden, old and new plants show
their beautiful flowers.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

johnw

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: June 18, 2019, 02:36:38 AM »
A superb find by Dave Veinotte here in NS. No name on it yet but I think it merits one. Juniperus horizontalis, an extremely dwarf form of this native, would be great in a trough. john
John in coastal Nova Scotia

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: June 18, 2019, 09:32:52 AM »
Small Leontopodium fascinate me especially... Leontopodium macrocephalum from Nepal belongs to it. It grows more like a very tiny shrub and the first flower shows a bizarre shape. It is actually called the "golden" Leontopodium... so I can only wait to see if the colour of the flower will change.

Maggi Young

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2019, 10:25:18 AM »
A superb find by Dave Veinotte here in NS. No name on it yet but I think it merits one. Juniperus horizontalis, an extremely dwarf form of this native, would be great in a trough. john
My word, that is  a  tiny form!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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Catwheazle

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: June 18, 2019, 05:02:26 PM »
Bletilla striata. This clone (probably chinese) is full hard, without protection, here at Allgaeu.



« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 05:11:26 PM by Maggi Young »
Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil» Cicero, Ad Familiares IX,4

Leucogenes

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Re: June 2019 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: June 18, 2019, 06:25:47 PM »
It is a pleasure to walk in the garden, old and new plants show
their beautiful flowers.

Hello Rudi...

your beautiful pictures show that these plants feel very well in the current extreme heat... with me Globularia stygia shows itself at present also from the good side... just a southerner.😉

 

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