We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 5448 times)

Gabriela

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1744
  • Country: ca
  • Never enough Gentiana...
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2020, 11:09:39 PM »
Wow - that's a beautiful sight from Nova Scotia Gordon! Spring is on its way in Ontario as well.

Well, we can see what can be done about that Gabriela  ;)

Thanks Trond :) I'll also see maybe I can do better about the native ones.
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Leena

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1799
  • Country: fi
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2020, 08:12:37 AM »
My first small C.coum is flowering! :) it is grown from seed ex seeds from 2016, and has been planted in the ground for two year now, and survived. I have covered it with dry leaves during cold nights, I don't think it could have survived -13C when in bud otherwise (without snow).
In the background there is G.lagodechianus.
Trillium nivale was also sown in summer 2016 from fresh seeds, and the seedlings are now going to flower for the first time. :)
Leena from south of Finland

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #32 on: March 16, 2020, 10:44:55 AM »
Some cardamines this morning - in sunshine, for once!
C quinquefolia - this is the first time that I have seen this flower well. Usually some creature - pheasant? wood pigeon? vole? pecks off all the flower buds! A spreader, but what a delight.
C pentaphylla - always beautiful, a clumper, does not rampage everywhere.
C kitaibeli - often described as white, but really there is a touch of cream in the flowers.
C heptaphylla - usually slightly later, this one is just starting and is pure white.
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2020, 10:48:54 AM »
And lastly Cardamine  glandulifera, which I was told would take a while to settle and make a nice display. Well,it must  be 5 yrs at least and only ever a couple of flowers. No sign of buds yet. Is it destined for the compost heap? Mmmm.
Does anyone else have experience with this plant?
« Last Edit: March 16, 2020, 10:59:41 AM by Maggi Young »
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2020, 01:33:45 PM »
Corydalis malkensis is at last seeding around the garden, here with Anemone blanda.
661447-0

Helionopsis japonica is a super plant - and easy to propagate too, from leaf cuttings.
661449-1

Erythronium dens-canis makes a nice combination with a dark leaf primula.
661451-2

I love these wee puschkinias,  with the darker blue down the middle of each petal.
661453-3
« Last Edit: March 16, 2020, 02:14:26 PM by Maggi Young »
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Gail

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1328
  • Country: gb
  • So don't forget my friend to smell the flowers
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2020, 05:30:14 PM »
Helionopsis japonica is a super plant - and easy to propagate too, from leaf cuttings.
I wouldn't have thought of that. Has anyone ever tried Erythronium from leaf cuttings??
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

Gabriela

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1744
  • Country: ca
  • Never enough Gentiana...
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2020, 06:05:38 PM »
Inspiring spring images Carolyn!

My first small C.coum is flowering! :) it is grown from seed ex seeds from 2016, and has been planted in the ground for two year now, and survived. I have covered it with dry leaves during cold nights, I don't think it could have survived -13C when in bud otherwise (without snow).
In the background there is G.lagodechianus.
Trillium nivale was also sown in summer 2016 from fresh seeds, and the seedlings are now going to flower for the first time. :)

Congrats Leena!
I have few C. coum leaves in the garden, I'll watch them closely, who knows...
Gabriela
Ontario, zone 5
http://botanicallyinclined.org/

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42396
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2020, 06:23:00 PM »
I wouldn't have thought of that. Has anyone ever tried Erythronium from leaf cuttings??
No, we  haven't - I think we'll try this  season though! More  in  hope than expectation - with bulbs it  seems  unlikely.  May be  possible  to  get  some  growth, but  would  it  make  a  bulb to live  on?

« Last Edit: March 16, 2020, 06:24:48 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Gail

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1328
  • Country: gb
  • So don't forget my friend to smell the flowers
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2020, 06:35:21 PM »
with bulbs it  seems  unlikely. 
but Eucomis do quite readily.
Gail Harland
Norfolk, England

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2020, 07:54:01 PM »
I will rush out and sacrifice some erythronium leaves tomorrow! You are right, Gail, I have had great success with eucomis from leaf cuttings.
By the way, leaf cuttings work for Ypsilindra too  - they are similar in to Helionopsis.
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2020, 07:58:11 PM »
Now a couple of shrubs from today:
First, one of my very favourites - Stachyurus 'Joy Forever'. I planted it in front of a holly tree, so that the pale flowers would shine out against a dark background

661623-0
« Last Edit: March 17, 2020, 10:25:41 AM by Maggi Young »
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

Leena

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1799
  • Country: fi
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2020, 08:14:42 PM »
And lastly Cardamine  glandulifera, which I was told would take a while to settle and make a nice display. Well,it must  be 5 yrs at least and only ever a couple of flowers. No sign of buds yet. Is it destined for the compost heap? Mmmm.
Does anyone else have experience with this plant?

I have had it now for maybe six or seven years, and it doesn't form so thick mat of leaves as yours but flowers every spring (until some rabbits eat it, this has happened now twice). But I don't know why yours don't flower..

You have so nice spring garden! :)
Leena from south of Finland

Leena

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1799
  • Country: fi
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #42 on: March 16, 2020, 08:16:35 PM »
I have few C. coum leaves in the garden, I'll watch them closely, who knows...

Mine showed the flower bud already in January and I was worried about it, because we didn't have any snow this year, but it has survived so far and started to flower last week.
Leena from south of Finland

ashley

  • Pops in from Cork
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2446
  • Country: ie
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #43 on: March 16, 2020, 08:44:27 PM »
Some cardamines this morning ...

Lovely to see these Carolyn.  Thank you.
Ashley Allshire, Cork, Ireland

Carolyn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 594
  • Country: scotland
Re: March 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #44 on: March 16, 2020, 09:42:10 PM »
I have had it now for maybe six or seven years, and it doesn't form so thick mat of leaves as yours but flowers every spring (until some rabbits eat it, this has happened now twice). But I don't know why yours don't flower..

You have so nice spring garden! :)
Thank you,  Leena.
I wonder if some sulphate of potash might encourage the cardamine to flower next year?
Carolyn McHale
Gardening in Kirkcudbright

 


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942