We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Tatra Mountains  (Read 49460 times)

ranunculus

  • utterly butterly
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5063
  • Country: england
  • ALL BUTTER AND LARD
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #75 on: July 28, 2009, 10:30:19 AM »
Hi Chris,
Your mystery orange plant is possibly Tephroseris capitata?

Excellent report once again.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Brian Ellis

  • Brian the Britisher
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5169
  • Country: england
  • 'Dropoholic
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #76 on: July 28, 2009, 10:46:45 AM »
Wow I have just been to the Dolomites and the Tatra in one morning and both are stunning, thanks Chris for a superb series of pictures of some wonderful plants.
Brian Ellis, Brooke, Norfolk UK. altitude 30m Mintemp -8C

Cephalotus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Country: pl
  • My passion is nature.
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #77 on: July 28, 2009, 12:48:18 PM »
Cliff, you are probably correct about the species. There is small problem, because on internet there were two plants for that name. The first one looked just the same as this one:


The second one looked exactly like that one:


The second one I found in different place few days ago. Now here is the question. Which one is the species you wrote? Or maybe both are? Is it possible for a plant, to be so different wile being the same species? The first one had no petals. Is it possible that they will be produces some time after opening?

There is also another problem, because in my country grow:
Senecio integrifolius ssp. aurantiacus
Senecio integrifolius ssp. capitatus

I have no photos or drawings of those two species. Under the name Senecio capitatus I found on internet two different looking plants... I can say for sure that is it Senecio integrifolius, but which subspecies... Hah... that is the mystery.
Best regards,
Chris Ciesielski
Zary, Poland

My photos: http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a206/cephalotus/

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41616
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #78 on: July 28, 2009, 12:54:34 PM »
More wonderful photos, Chris and  giving us your impressions of the place so perfectly.  8)
I am looking forward to the next days of your visit.
 Thank you so much for taking the time and trouble to share these with us!  :-* :-*
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Cephalotus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Country: pl
  • My passion is nature.
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #79 on: July 28, 2009, 05:22:11 PM »
Hi, I think it is time for next part of my photos.

Neottia nidus-avis - I started by visiting my old friend from the last year. It grew up. :)


Epipactis atrorubens - this orchid grows also in my forest.


Some views - unfortunately I do not have good lens to make sights photos and I have no time to put a special filter each time.


In Polish: Dolina Małej Łąki; in English: Little Meadow Valley


Do you think that it is hybrid between Delphinium elatum and oxysepalum? For me it is much too small for D. elatum and much too big for D. oxysepalum.


Minuartia verna - I may be wrong about the identification of this species. It looked so cute, that I had to make a photo of it.


Kondracka Kopa - we were going there. Our water supply was ending and we found no stream on our track.


Giewont - we went there on our fourth day.


Małołączniak - this route we took our way home


Some views down to Little Meadow Valley


Campanula alpina forma alba


Dianthus glacialis - we went there to find this gorgeous flower. Ah, my face was full of smile when we finally saw it.










Gentiana nivalis - wile photographing D. glacialis I saw this tiny, little blue gentiana hiding behind a rock.




High Tatras


Sight on Małołączniak - amazing, we could still find real snow. :)


Some Trollius altissimus




Me, admiring...


...this beauty :D


Viola lutea ssp. sudetica - now it was the right time to find it. It was full florescence of this species.


Soldanella carpatica - starting flowering here the snow melted...


Rocks overgrown by many lichen species


Our was down






That was end of day two. Now more relaxing, but also full of attractions. Firstly I wanted to to Tatrańska Łomnica to see their botanical garden. How their plants are growing and so one. To show it to my cousin and also buy some plants for friends this time. :) They had some exposition of plants photos and their plants propagating. I will not show all, but only few:










Onobrychis montana - ending flowering. But I remember that it was in full flower, when I visited them in September. Maybe it flowered for the second time. I do not know, but it looked amazing! (Also have it, I will try to propagate it.)


Gladiolus imbricatus


Ranunculus altitatrensis??? This one is a mistery for me. I could find no photo of it on the internet. But they have it. I wonder how it flowers. You know, it was not a suitable time to visit that botanical garden for viewing plants. So I was lucky to see anything.


Some other plants.


Monstrous Saxifraga oppositifolia - I have never seen bigger one


Now back in Poland we took a short track on Nosal. We hoped to see Leontopodium alpinum.

Epipactis atrorubens


I see that I forgot to show you photo of myself made during the first day... Here you have.


And on Nosal


Some sights wile being on Nosal.






Gymnadenia conopsea - growing everywhere now. :) Also everywhere smelling the same sweet nice smell.


Gymnagernia odorata - bigger one ;-)


Platanthera bifolia - the only one I have ever found in those mountains... I haven't expected to find it.


Swertia perennis ssp. alpestris - one of the first flowering. My cousins favourite plant.


In Polish: Dolina Białego; In English: Whites Valley - Still live three. :D


White Stream


Corallorhiza trifida - nice, but not flowering clump


Wile going down Whites Valley, we found a bouquet made of Dactylorhiza maculata and Gymnadenia conopsea. This sad view showed lack of manners and disrespect to nature, and simple stupidity of some tourists visiting these mountains.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2009, 05:30:51 PM by Cephalotus »
Best regards,
Chris Ciesielski
Zary, Poland

My photos: http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a206/cephalotus/

ranunculus

  • utterly butterly
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5063
  • Country: england
  • ALL BUTTER AND LARD
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #80 on: July 28, 2009, 05:48:11 PM »
Hi Chris,
Ranunculus altitatrensis is an endemic to the Tatras - similar I believe to ranunculus acris.

After long-term study (ca. 40 years) of the tetraploid populations of Ranunculus acris L. s.l. in the northern valleys of the Vysoké Tatry Mts and the diploid populations in other parts of Slovakia a conclusion has been drawn that a new species developed here. It has been formally described recently as R. altitatrensis Paclová & Murín. Full description, as well as karyological, taxonomic, ecological and phytogeographic evidence about this species is presented.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2009, 05:50:48 PM by ranunculus »
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Armin

  • Prized above rubies
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2509
  • Country: de
  • Confessing Croconut
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #81 on: July 29, 2009, 08:53:30 AM »
Hallo Chris,
I just have gone through your latest postings and absorbed your phantastic images and information.
Tatra mountains are a places of real gems!
Simply wonderful. 8) 8) 8)
Best wishes
Armin

tonyg

  • Chief Croconut
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
  • Country: england
  • Never Stop Looking
    • Crocus Pages
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #82 on: July 29, 2009, 10:00:06 AM »
Fabulous pictures - and great story of your adventures.  Some lovely plants and shown in their natural context.  All will help me compile my report for the talk ;)
The minuartia that you are unsure about might be a silene, perhaps Silene rupestris?

Cephalotus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Country: pl
  • My passion is nature.
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #83 on: July 29, 2009, 11:56:44 PM »
I hope you are ready for next part. So here we go.

Streams - I had some need to make an artistic photo.










It was foggy, but rainless day. The temperature on the peaks was about 12*C and temperature felt was about 4* lower. It was really fantastic. I saw the track not more than 15 m in all directions. There were many tourists, although I could not see them. I felt like the were just mine. :)






I had second artistic need. ;-)


Polygonum bistorta


More fogg






Sempervivum montanum - Last year it was just starting to flower this year I finally got it in its full beauty.






Lycopodium alpinum - very rare plants, and I must say, that quite attractive. I regret, that it is probably impossible to grow in garden.




Gentiana punctata - how could I not show a photo of that one.


Slovakia seen through fog




This time not fog, but clouds. About 40 m lower fog was gone, clouds started to show themselves and sun blinked to my and my cousin from time to time. The weather went crazy. In one moment there was full sun in another it was dark from thick clouds.








Giewont - those "tourists" who go somewhere to tick places on their list, stayed at home. This always beset peak this day was secluded.  Look at the weather when we started climbing it...


It was covered with Oxytropis carpatica,


Saxifraga caesia, the higher the better I found;






(after this one I decided that I cannot find any better)


Saxifraga opoositifoli, where I found the only one flowering, or maybe signs of it flowering in spring. I decided to go back there in proper time to make photo of its flowers. Yeah, I know, I am crazy. ;-)


Senecio aurantiacus - probably, because I am not sure of that. This species I found just and only on this peak, as for know.






And wile going down... It was totally different story.




Looking down. Clouds are coming.




And after minute or two again darkness... How I love mountains. :D


Dianthus speciosus - one of the very first flowering.




Dianthus plunarius ssp. praecox - I finally made some good photos of this beauty. If there is anyone who would like to have it, I can share.








Scabiosa lucida - it grows only in the mountains. If it was a bit smaller, it could be just right to a rock garden, but with that size, I do not recommend it.


Our way down


Leontopodium alpinum - I have never seen more elegant clump than this one. Hard to describe, you have to feel it.






Helianthemum nummularium ssp. grandiflorum - I like its flowers, but it is a bit too big in the mountains to try grow it in my tiniest rock garden in the world. ;-)


Bupleurum ranunculoides - I have never seen this species anywhere before. I looks quite attractive and small enough for normal garden. Now when I know how it is called I have to try to find it.




My friend from last year have grown up and matured. :) Last year it had one tiny flower, this year it was full demonstration.


Pinguicula vulgaris - I knew this population since last year it grows the highest from any other populations of this species. I knew it will be flowering as the latests of all, but I would never bet there will still be what to look at. :D




With that kind accent we ended day four. I think for the next time I will show you at once last two days. We shall see. :) I still have many photos you to show.

Cheers,
Chris
« Last Edit: July 30, 2009, 12:07:26 AM by Cephalotus »
Best regards,
Chris Ciesielski
Zary, Poland

My photos: http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a206/cephalotus/

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41616
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #84 on: July 30, 2009, 01:33:21 PM »
Chris, what a privilege it is to join you for this tour in the Tatras. Your photographs are super, we are enjoyingthem all, from the little flowers to the wide mountains... and especially when you get that artistic feeling!  8)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Ragged Robin

  • cogent commentator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3494
  • Country: 00
  • in search of all things wild and wonderful
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #85 on: July 30, 2009, 02:32:59 PM »
Chris, more and more lovely photos of your trip - all almost to good to be true!  However, I have to say that you have inspired me with your photo of:
Quote
Leontopodium alpinum - I have never seen more elegant clump than this one. Hard to describe, you have to feel it.


As I have tried growing this twice now in my rock garden and it sets seed perfectly but then the next year nothing - this year I have watched slugs and snails attack it and have moved my one plant to see if I can find the perfect spot but still it gets eaten.  I would have thought the furry silver leaves were unappetising but I'm wrong - it's obviously a sought after delicacy  ;D

Now from your photos I have another idea which is to push it tight into a rock crevice with no space at all for slugs to slumber and see if I can grow such an elegant clump as you have found. ;)
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

Luc Gilgemyn

  • VRV President & Channel Hopper
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5469
  • Country: be
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #86 on: July 30, 2009, 05:58:09 PM »
Thank you very much Chris !!!
Wonderful pictures of a great mountain range !!  :o
 
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

WimB

  • always digs deeper...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • Country: be
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #87 on: July 30, 2009, 06:21:33 PM »
Chris,

stunning pictures of fantastic plants, thank you for sharing them with us.
Wim Boens - Secretary VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Flemish Rock Garden society (VRV): http://www.vrvforum.be/
Facebook page VRV: http://www.facebook.com/pages/VRV-Vlaamse-Rotsplanten-Vereniging/351755598192270

Cephalotus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Country: pl
  • My passion is nature.
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #88 on: July 30, 2009, 11:05:25 PM »
Robin, I had problems with slugs last year. Very serious problems. They almost ate my Dianthus nitidus, which effect was no flowers this year. They totally ate to roots my Tanacetum alpinum. :/ This year I decided I will regularly use poison. I know that it may not be an elegant method, but I cannot loose plants because of the slugs. Last year I picked them from my rock garden and moved to the forest. I made so much effort not to kill them and get rid of them for good. Unfortunately, when I was gone for one week and I came back I was terrified. Many plants were severely damaged and as I wrote T. alpinum was totally eaten. It tried to produce leaves, but they were regularly eaten and all plants died. This year I put one plant into a pot so that way I will not have to get the plant again.

This year when I use the poison I find many dead slugs on my rock garden. Much more then I expected. I have no idea where they hide or from where they come. I know one thing. This year they haven't destroyed a single plant. Species that were damaged last year grown up very well. Maybe next year I will see them flowering and get seed for propagation.

One day, when I will have bigger garden I want to have a crevice rock garden. I want it to look as natural as possible. I will plant there species which look more beautiful when they are smaller. :) Soon I will add next part of photos. :) I promise you more interesting species. :)

Cheers,
Chris
Best regards,
Chris Ciesielski
Zary, Poland

My photos: http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a206/cephalotus/

mark smyth

  • Hopeless Galanthophile
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15309
  • Country: gb
Re: Tatra Mountains
« Reply #89 on: July 30, 2009, 11:30:41 PM »
For 5 years I've been asked to go to Slovakia to visit friends and go to the Tatras. I really have to. Thanks for all the photos.
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

 

In Association with Amazon.co.uk


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942