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Author Topic: Log 14-3 July 2008  (Read 10413 times)

David Nicholson

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Log 14-3 July 2008
« on: July 03, 2008, 08:51:19 PM »
Paul, you have my sympathies and it is regrettable that some of the sicknesses that seem to affect the two legged (rather than the free spirited four legged members!) members of society these days should be exercised at Wisley. All I can add is that on our last visit to Wisley my wife remarked on the number of young mums with babes in pushchairs who were, quite properly, making use of the space and they and their children were enjoying themselves.

I always think of one thing that sets Wisley apart for me (ie from RBGE) and that  is it is possible, in the alpine house, to get up close to the plants and to smell the flowers. Long may it continue, but I suspect that it's time will be limited.

Keep up the good work.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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Paul Cumbleton

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2008, 02:37:27 PM »
Thanks David.
Yes, the buggy brigade seem to have multiplied enormously in recent times. The majority are no problem and clearly enjoy their time in the garden. It's when they come 3 abreast down a narrow path that you have to start to worry!

Paul
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Katherine J

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2008, 03:47:17 PM »
Paul, you made a great job writing about all these. I think these are problems of all botanical gardens, and it's very sad.
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Joakim B

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2008, 04:36:13 PM »
Paul
If You look at it from the reverse angle being a kid or a father of one it is very boring with paths that are to narrow for a van/push car (or what ever You would call it) or where plants have been allowed to make a path to narrow to pass without damage to van or plant. It also make the wheelchair access impossible since most vans are smaller than wheelchairs. I have now much bigger sympathies for people in wheelchairs than I used to. An other problem is when there is deep grit on the paths that make pulling a van very heavy and I bet it would be very tricky for a wheel chair since they are much heavier.
I have never been to Wisley so I do not know if You have any of the above problems but I have seen them in other public gardens / botanical gardens.

Damage to plant is unacceptable even if it is done by kids and even more if it is done by adults, but to make a pile of grit might not be so bad. It is hard to explain to kids that here You can play with it but not here or when You do it is usually to late but generally one can as a parent fix that "damage" oneself.

The theft of plant is very sad and the orchid section in the botanical garden in Lund has different steel cages for the plants. This makes it harder to take pictures and it looks a bit sad. Now there is less but I understand that one does not want to have plants stolen and often there is not a guard/guide to supervise the visitors so alternatives are limmited.

Maybe using bigger labels will help people read them even if they will look a bit big instead of taking them up.

Sometimes big planters are actually used as dustbins and there might not have been a big one close by so people used it.

It is sad when people are not considerate to other visitors and then think they can destroy plants and displays.
Luckely most people are nice and make a garden visit a lovely time.

It was nice to see how popular You where amongst the future gardeners in the log from from two weeks ago.

Kind regards and keep up the good work
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

Paul T

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2008, 12:26:20 PM »
Paul,

Catching up on some of your logs, as it has been a while since I've had a chance to catch up on them.  Having been working for a few months earlier this year at our Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) here in Canberra I can tell you that you aren't alone, although we don't have the same sorts of displays as you do so we aren't as open to that.  Still, things trampled, particularly in the "rock garden" areas where the kids are allowed to hop from rock to rock by irritating parents who don't think about what will happen when the foot slips an the munchkin ends up landing on the plants (etc.).  The other problem we have in late autumn is the mushroom hunters..... those, mainly teenagers, who come through looking for the hallucinogenic mushrooms that grow naturally around the gardens.  They are so focused on looking for the mushrooms that they just walk through anything, not noticing whether they're on paths or not.  Most frustrating.  It was quite amusing to see the sudden influx of teenagers who suddenly felt the irresistable call of nature and just HAD to visit the gardens though.  ;)

Anyway, just wanted to extend my sympathies as well.  We don't have your wonderful pot displays or tufa or anything like that, so we don't have that level of vandalism, but given that some of the plants in the ANBG may be the only specimen in captivity it is a concern if anything is endangered by wandering feet or hands!  ::)

Your first picture with the empty pot being used as a garbage bin I personally don't think is that bad.  I'd much rather they threw it into what they probably believed had been left there for that purpose, rather than disposing of it on the ground somewhere else in the premises.

Good luck with sorting out ways of stopping the carnage.  If you're wanting ways to keep the cat out of certain areas of the gardens there are methods that should work, and no I am not thinking of ways that involve permanent harm (just in case you were thinking I was anti-cat).   :o
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Paddy Tobin

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2008, 09:26:56 PM »
Paul,

This theft of plants is widespread, unfortunately. Botanic gardens are particularly vulnerable, I believe. People seem to view theft from them as "non-personal" theft, simply relieving an institution of plants which they consided would be better  enjoyed in their own gardens.

It is also commonplace among those who visit gardens. At one time we opened our garden to the public as part of a local garden group but found the amount of damage done and the amount of plants taken was unacceptable. I quickly dropped out of this scheme, as you might imagine.

I can certainly sympathise with you in this situation. I know several members of staff in the Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin, Dublin, and also staff in other state gardens open to the public and know very well that for them this is far more than simply a job; it is a passion they have for plants and gardens and it must be so demoralising to see some wretches destroying one's work.

However, Paul, I know that you have large numbers passing through Wisley each and every day. If you do the maths and calculate what percentage of visitors do damage in the garden I'm sure you will find it is quite small. The vast majority visit gardens, such as Wisley, and are simply thrilled to be able to enjoy such a treasure and would consider it a dreadful abuse to do any damage.

Now, as for the cat - well, I'm sure that after a long enough spell in the compost heap even this moggy could be of some use!

Paddy
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Joakim B

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Re: Log 14-3 July 2008
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2008, 08:27:35 PM »
Regarding thieving I have a suggestion.
In the botanical garden of Ajuda Lisbon they where selling plants and thy were cheap. I presume that the planting of the plants are done by the students at the horticultural University that the park is associated/belongs to.
Then people are less likely to take there own cuttings if there already exist a cutting/ plant with roots for 1-3 euro. They even had their roses for sale, They need back up plants and need to make new one all the time a presume. Maybe that will stop people from taking memories back home.
Just an idea that is nice even if it is not against anti-theft.
Kind regards
Joakim
Potting in Lund in Southern Sweden and Coimbra in the middle of Portugal as well as a hill side in central Hungary

 


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