We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button


Author Topic: Plant propagation  (Read 9354 times)

Michael J Campbell

  • Forum's " Mr Amazing"
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2428
  • Country: ie
    • lewisias.
Plant propagation
« on: August 26, 2008, 07:12:05 PM »
For those of you who were fortunate or unfortunate enough to acquire some of my Lewisia hybs,here is a useful tip on propagating them.
As you will have discovered they are slow enough to produce offsets,but if you follow the pictures below they will show you another method. The flowers are produced on a scape between two and four inches long with leaves on the lower part. remove this as close to the plant as possible and leave to dry overnight. Then insert them in sand and they will root in five or six weeks. they will not all root and make plants, but enough will root to make it worth the effort.

 Plant showing flowers
 Cuttings
 Cuttings detail
 cutting detail
 Cuttings
 Cuttings in sand bed.
 Rooted cuttings
 Rooted cuttings detail


Cheers Michael.



« Last Edit: August 26, 2008, 07:17:27 PM by Michael J Campbell »

David Nicholson

  • Hawkeye
  • Journal Access Group
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 12485
  • Country: england
  • Why can't I play like Clapton
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2008, 07:22:50 PM »
Great info. Michael, should this method work with species as well please?
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
"Victims of satire who are overly defensive, who cry "foul" or just winge to high heaven, might take pause and consider what exactly it is that leaves them so sensitive, when they were happy with satire when they were on the side dishing it out"

Carlo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 921
  • Country: us
  • BirdMan and Botanical Blogger
    • BotanicalGardening.com
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2008, 07:28:44 PM »
I'd start nipping, David. It's likely to work--at least to some degree. AND what do you have to lose?

Let us know how it goes...
Carlo A. Balistrieri
Vice President
The Garden Conservancy
Zone 6

Twitter: @botanicalgarden
Visit: www.botanicalgardening.com and its BGBlog, http://botanicalgardening.com/serendipity/index.php

Michael J Campbell

  • Forum's " Mr Amazing"
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2428
  • Country: ie
    • lewisias.
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2008, 07:30:31 PM »
David,the species grow easily from seed so I did not  try it . I only use this method because the hybs do not produce seed and were slow to make offsets, so had to find another way.  I find some of the species take a long time to root from offsets.

cheers, Michael.

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 40332
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2008, 07:32:22 PM »
Michael, thanks for this clear and very useful demonstration.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2302
  • Country: gb
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2008, 11:15:27 PM »
Most interesting propagation information.  I love propagating plants!!
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

Paul T

  • Our man in Canberra
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8440
  • Country: au
  • Paul T.
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2008, 03:01:01 AM »
Michael,

So you leaves the flowers on your cuttings?  What do the resultant plants look like?  I'm assuming a multi-crowned plant, as the dormant buds around the shoot activate?  Absolutely fascinating, particularly with such clear and concise pictures to show what you're doing.  Great stuff!!!!!
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9C. Max summer temp 40C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16256
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2008, 09:43:26 PM »
Is there a good reason to leave the flower stems on the cuttings? My first reaction would normally be to trim those off, as much because of their weight as anything else, pulling the cutting over, in the sand but as well, maybe a higher proportion could root, if they weren't putting energy into keeping the flowers going? Any thoughts?
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Michael J Campbell

  • Forum's " Mr Amazing"
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2428
  • Country: ie
    • lewisias.
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2008, 10:37:21 PM »
The reason for leaving the flower on the scape is because it is only a flower scape and not a normal stem (branch or offset) of a plant that one would normally use. If you remove the flower the scape whithers, its job has finished. leaving the flower on gives it reason to stay alive  until the roots have formed. I have tried removing the flowers but it was unsuccessful.
Hope this answers your question.

Lesley Cox

  • way down south !
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16256
  • Country: nz
  • Gardening forever, house work.....whenever!
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2008, 11:57:03 PM »
It certainly does and explained like that it's entirely logical. Thanks Michael.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

ChrisB

  • SRGC Subscription Secretary
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2302
  • Country: gb
Re: Plant propagation
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2008, 09:37:11 AM »
How very interesting.... never thought of that
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

 

In Association with Amazon.co.uk


Scottish Rock Garden Club is a Charity registered with Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR): SC000942