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Author Topic: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008  (Read 15836 times)

ranunculus

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2008, 01:50:17 PM »
Dave and David,
Many thanks for these stunning images, for the requested information and for the reassurance that my aorta, my lungs, my knees and my dwindling stamina reserves won't be tested to the absolute limits. If seventy year old visitors can access these magnificent screes, then there is even a chance for little Mrs. B. !!!  Ouch!
Now all we have to do is plan ... and save ... and train ... and save ...
Would these plants co-exist with the equally stunning (but less dramatic) Lignocarpa carnosula, Stellaria roughii and Lobelia roughii?
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2008, 02:06:12 PM »
Amazing pictures David and Dave !!!  :o
Nice of you two that you went through all that trouble getting up that mountain just to show us these....  ;)

Honestly - some of the best ever R. pictures I ever saw !!
Thanks a lot for showing !
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

David Nicholson

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2008, 02:32:19 PM »
Thanks for posting these folks, smashing plants. I see Dave Toole is still pushing the boundaries of sartorial elegence, and to me David it looked a bit parkie for shorts!
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
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t00lie

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2008, 09:36:54 PM »
Too wet here this morning so the hedge cutting is on hold.

David N
The following pic is of the state of my purple tights at the end of the trip--(sorry my camera is showing them as blue.)

What David L hasn't mentioned is that he ran into a problem while we were up high,where a large part of the front of his sole started to come away from the boot.For a while he took on the look of a person wearing a flipper--(over sized leg action in trying to lift the foot well above the rocks at every 2nd step !!!--hehe).
Although a serious situation we couldn't help but have a giggle.

Anyway as my pants were 'past it' we cut both legs to use as a sleeve over the boot and sole.
Using a bit of Kiwi ingenuity a flat rock was firstly used to twist the material a number of times and then wedged on the side of the boot to form ,(excuse the pun--smile),a 'tight' bandage.

It was so successful only one sleeve was required.

Unfortunately on the flip side of matters the clothing remanents are only fit for burning so i guess my sartorial elegance is at an end--sob!!!!.Wink.

Dave
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 11:02:37 PM by t00lie »
Dave Toole.  Invercargill.Bottom of the South Island New Zealand .Zone 9--Maritime climate .1100mm rainfall PA.

ian mcenery

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2008, 11:18:08 PM »
So sad well RIP Dave's trues. Bet it will be difficult to find replacements particularly in such a subtle colour  ;) ::) ;D

By the way David and Dave great piccies loved the buttercup and the mountains. Thanks
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 11:19:45 PM by ian mcenery »
Ian McEnery Sutton Coldfield  West Midlands 600ft above sea level

David Lyttle

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2008, 08:24:56 AM »
Not withstanding appearances, Dave T is a true gentleman, (a Southern man, but we wont go down that track- there was a story told about pig dogs at one stage during the weekend) sacrificing his longjohns to help a mate.

These boots were not made for walking (Note the brand Asolo- I hope this gets lots of hits with Google)
« Last Edit: December 16, 2008, 09:19:40 AM by David Lyttle »
David Lyttle
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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2008, 10:02:10 AM »
Cliff,

Stellaria roughii and Lobelia roughii were both present. I hope to post the pictures shortly. Lignocarpa carnulosa is not found this far south.

Gerd,

I have a picture of a violet growing at 1700 metres. Again I will post it when I have processed it. In the meantime here is tonights offering.

Picture1 is Aciphylla scott-thomsonii growing amongst the tussock. This species is New Zealands largest Aciphylla and favours wetter sites than Aciphylla aurea which is also present on the St Marys Range. You can see the water capturing capacity of the large snow tussocks - they are capturing water from the fog.

Picture 2 is Dracophyllum pronum. It is a sprawling shrub that is common on drier sites in the tussock grassland.

Picture 3 is a closeup of the flowers of Dracophyllum pronum.

Picture 4 is Epilobium crassum growing on scree.

Picture 5 is Gaultheria depressa var novae zelandiae. It is prostrate and creeping. It is common in tussock grassland.

Picture 6 is another Gaultheria which has me a little puzzled. It is a small shrub with larger flowers than Gautheria depressa shown above.

Picture 7 is Mysine nummularifolia showing the flowers. This species has attractive bronze foliage and purple berries ( the same colour as Dave T's longjohns)

Picture 8 is Kelleria dieffenbachii ( or maybe it is Kellaria villosa)

Picture 9 is Pimelea oreophila. This plant was flowering in profusion all through the tussock grassland.

Pictur 10 is again Pimelea oreophila. This particular plant has pinkish flowers.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2008, 11:04:18 AM »
Wonderful, David ... can't wait for the rest ... many thanks once again for taking the time and effort to resize and post.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Maggi Young

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #23 on: December 16, 2008, 11:08:40 AM »
We were so pleased to hear the Hugh Wood was going to be accompanying "the Daves" and Johan on this trip.... we in Scotland are especially proud of Hugh, born in Aberdeenshire, who has devoted many years to climbing the mountains of his new country, New Zealand, plant spotting and photographing as he goes.... and without whom we would be in ignorance of the captivating  Ranunculus acraeus ...which is surely the MOST gorgeous buttercup  8)


I think we can be sure now of what "the Daves" have on their Santa wish list.... boots and long johns.....I do hope Santa is listening..... these great guys deserve a reward!
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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kiwi

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #24 on: December 17, 2008, 02:05:19 AM »
Awesome read Dave and David, it has inspired me to get up for a look this weekend, I think I'll revisit the R.haastii pactch we found in Jan. do you think they will be in flower now?
Cheers,
Doug.
Doug Logan, Canterbury NZ.

kiwi

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #25 on: December 17, 2008, 06:38:55 AM »
Just to jog your memory.....
Doug Logan, Canterbury NZ.

t00lie

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2008, 08:04:07 AM »
Hello Doug

Great to hear from you.

"I think I'll revisit the R.haastii patch we found in Jan. do you think they will be in flower now?".

I'd say there is a good chance ---at least you'll know where to find them.

Cheers Dave
Dave Toole.  Invercargill.Bottom of the South Island New Zealand .Zone 9--Maritime climate .1100mm rainfall PA.

Lvandelft

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #27 on: December 17, 2008, 09:32:07 AM »
Beautiful pictures Doug!
Would you mind giving us some names?
Most of NZ. plants will stay unknown for us here in the N.H. :(
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

David Lyttle

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #28 on: December 17, 2008, 10:36:21 AM »
Thanks everyone for your generous comments

These pictures were taken as we were heading up the hill with Hugh Wood. Hugh was setting a cracking pace up the front with the rest the party straggling along behind.

Picture 1 shows the mist clearing from  the saddle at 1700 metres where we were heading. There is an old 4WD track to the saddle but at the moment it would be impassable. The saddle is above the left end of the large snow patch. Hugh is one of the two figures in the picture.

Picture 2 is a small plant of Aciphylla dobsonii growing in a blocky scree. By this time the mist had cleared  the strong light made conditions for photography less than ideal.

Picture 3 is another picture of Aciphylla dobsonii showing the flowers and Picture 4 is a closeup of the flowers.

Picture 5 and 6 are of the small buttercup Ranunculus gracilipes. This species was growing in profusion in the turfy bogs anywhere where there was water flowing.

Picture 7 shows an amazing plant of Melicytus alpinus (Violaceae) growing on an outcrop of shattered graywacke at 1700 metres. The plant is surviving by growing out of the cracks in the rock. Many of the branches are dead because of the harsh conditions but the plant appears to be thriving. you can see this in picture 8 which is a closeup view of the branches.

Picture 9 is of a flowers on another plant of Melicytus alpinus taken lower down. The higher plant had not yet flowered.

Picture 10 shows two species of Anisotome. Anisotme flexuosa is on the left with the fine hair tipped leave segments while Anisotome aromatica is on the right. The fruits of Anisotome flexuosa are well developed while Anisotome aromatica is still flowering.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Maggi Young

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Re: New Zealand Field Trips December 2008
« Reply #29 on: December 17, 2008, 11:35:15 AM »
Welcome, Doug, we can't have enough Kiwis and their photos on this Forum... many of us are greatly interested in your native flora. 8)


The photos on these threads are a great joy! Thanks to you all.
David, that  last pic of the two little Anisotomes are a revelation to me.... really little chaps, aren't they?
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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