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Author Topic: NZ Field Trips 2009  (Read 33625 times)

Ross Graham

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2009, 07:58:13 PM »
Once again very nice pics David, Once again, wish I was in the hills  :(

Thanks Maggie for educating me on the meaning of Psychrophila (or psycho-feeler as I sometimes call it) Its possibly the most annoying name change ever Caltha was such a nice easy name and one even I could spell.

Gerd: seed does reach the Northern Hemisphere, when I get lucky every so often.
Also it does grow at lower altitudes, here is a photo taken today. It flowered for me this year as well but I didn't get a good photo of that. Its easy enough to grow if you prick the seedlings out early and keep the roots cool. I use a polystyrene trough to do this.
As I'm sure David could tell you, the plant formerly known as Caltha produces flower buds for the next season during the current growing season. So that if you were to dissect the plant in summer you would see next springs flower buds. As I only have 3 plants in cultivation I'm not going to do that! This means flowers can burst out of the melting snow as soon as possible. 



« Last Edit: January 08, 2009, 10:29:39 PM by Maggi Young »

Gerdk

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2009, 10:20:16 PM »
David & Ross,
Thank you. It seems there is a glimmer of hope this extraordinary plant will be introduced to the NH  :D

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2009, 10:57:43 AM »
Ross,
Good you were successful in growing and flowering Psychrophila - I dont think I would have much success out here.

This time have have some pictures of small things to post

Pictures 1 and 2 are cushions of Phyllachne colensoi. Despite it being a very common plant it is always impressive in flower.

Picture 3 is Abrotanella caespitosa. It is a tiny plant with incospicuous flowers. The plant in the foreground has one flower.

Picture 4 is Anisotome lanuginosa. It is growing in a cushion of Raoulia hectori so the grey woolly leaves are not obvious.

Picture 5 is a tiny Cardamine. I think it is Cardamine depressa but someone might know better. I grow plenty of Cardamines but not this one.

Picture 6 is a tiny Leptinella growing in a boggy turf. I am guessing that it is Leptinella pusilla. It has the most remarkable honey-scented flowers. Dave discovered this when He was photographing the plant with his nose down inches from it.

Picture 7 is Celmisia alpina. This species is very similar to Celmisia gracilenta but is smaller and confined to subalpine bogs.

Picture 8 is Raoulia grandiflora. Again it is a very common plant and has the largest flowers of all the Raoulias.

Picture 9 is  a flowering plant of Dracophyllum prostratum.  This species grows in subalpine bogs. It was growing in profusion at this locality.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Armin

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2009, 06:30:59 PM »
Dave and David,

thank you for introducing these alpine beauties from NZ.
I can't comment on specific issues - just study and learning ;) 8)
Best wishes
Armin

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2009, 10:54:03 AM »
Just a few scenic pictures tonight - I am away to Nelson for 3 weeks leaving tomorrow morning. This is a new part of the country for me so I will be interested to see what I can find. It is a very diffferent topography from Otago with  mountains made out of limestone.

In the meantime back to the South Hector Mountains.

Picture 1 We walked along the ridge crest until we reached a point just above the two patches of snow on the left and headed back dropping down into a series of alpine bogs below the crags on the skyline.The snow melt flows down into this area giving rise to an extensive wetland with its own suite of plants. The plant in the foreground is Celmisia lyallii.

Picture 2  Dave negotiating the slopes below the schist crags.

Picture 3  Descending to bog and tarns Hector Mountains

Picture 4 At bog and tarns

Picture 5 more wetlands

Picture 6 Little stream surrounded by mosses

Picture 7 Closeup view of stream showing surrounding vegetation . The white flowers are Oxalis magellanica

Picture 8 Detail of vegetation, the red is an Epilobium

Picture 9 Colours and textures in the bog vegetation.

Picture Colony of Bulbinella angustifolia

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2009, 11:35:12 AM »
Continuing from the previous posting

Picture 1 Bulbinella angustifolia

Picture 2 More bogs

Picture 3 Stream with Celmisia verbascifolia

Picture 4 Celmisia verbascifolia

Picture 5 Celmisia verbascifolia growing by little waterfall. This particular form was formerly known as Celmisia petiolata. It is characterised by the prominent purple midribs but is now considered to be a form of Celmisia verbascifolia.

Picture 6 shows the schist crags above the wetland: the streams are flowing down between the rock outcrops.

Picture 7 is another view of the bogs and schist outcrops.

Picture 8 is a pyramid of schist. The view is looking across the upper Nevis Valley to the Garvie Mountains beyond.

Picture 9 is Geum uniflorum. I was surprised to see it growing here. Generally it prefers the wetter mountains further west
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2009, 12:58:56 PM »
More great shots David ! Love the Celmisia near the small waterfall  8)   Pure nature ! 
Looking at these shots I always wonder from behind which rock the hobbits will appear...  ;D
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

maggiepie

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2009, 02:38:02 PM »
Terrific pics David, I would kill for some of those rocks.
I love the little geum uniflorum.
Helen Poirier, New Brunswick, Canada-Zone 4b

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #38 on: January 12, 2009, 06:05:17 PM »
Hello Helen, Luc,

Pleased you liked the pictures; I hoped to show the habitats some of these plants grow in. Alpine bogs have their own characteristic flora.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ruweiss

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #39 on: January 12, 2009, 08:15:03 PM »
David, thank you so much for these beautiful pictures. They bring back sweet memories from our trip to
NZ, the conference Alpines 96 and all the friendly and helpful people who made our stay so unforgetable.
The landscape and the flowers are so good against the winter blues! Please keep on the good work.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Senecio 2

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #40 on: January 13, 2009, 06:58:40 PM »
During a break in the scorching temperatures Canterbury has been subject to so far this year a small group of local SRGC members took the opportunity to visit Mt Hutt on Monday.  The first picture is the view looking down from the scree on the north side of the basin.

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On the rocks half-way up the scree were well established populations of Raoulia mammillaris.

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Just above the rocks were found the emerging stems of Haastia sinclairii, some already in flower.

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Also in this area were isolated specimens of Lobelia roughii, past flowering but their foliage is worth viewing.

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The rest of the scree was fairly barren apart from foliage of the odd Ranunculus haastii.

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and occasional Leptinella atrata.

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After making tracks down the scree to the area under the ski-tows this magnificent specimen of Ranunculus haastii in fruit was found.

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Further down in the area surrounding the stream draining the basin were, Celmisia sessiliflora,

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Aciphylla monroi,

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and an Ourisia sp.,

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There were also good flowering specimens of many alpines seen on the road up to the ski field, Iíll do these on another post.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #41 on: January 13, 2009, 07:56:03 PM »
That fruiting Ranunculus haastii is TO DIE FOR!
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Senecio 2

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #42 on: January 13, 2009, 08:48:58 PM »
Unfortunately Cliff weíll probably get beaten to the seed, the area is just too accessible. Continuing with plants seen on Mondayís trip to Mt Hutt firstly some more from the stream area. More Leptinella atrata,
 
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another Aciphylla monroi,

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and another Leptinella sp.

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The next pictures are all of plants near the road leading up to the buildings associated with the tourist and skiing activities. Firstly a colourful Epilobium sp.,
 
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Colobanthus acicularis, an excellent and easy cushion plant in cultivation,

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Brachyglottis bellidioides

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Montia sp. (previously Neopaxia)

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Iíll finish with Leucogenes grandiceps

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These and many other specimens of Leucogenes grandiceps can be seen on the rock faces along the road. In some instances so close it is possible to lean out of the car and touch them.

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Ross Graham

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #43 on: January 15, 2009, 08:09:05 PM »
Hi Senicio 2, Great photos from Mt. Hutt  :D
 I dont want to be annoying but here are some of my ideas on the names of some of your photos:

Aciphylla monroi= A montana
Leptinella sp.= L dendyi
Ourisia sp = O caespitosa I think

Did you see the Hasstia recurva Raoulia eximia or Ranunculus crithmifolius?
Mt hutt is a great place is a shame the ski field has bulldozed such large areas above the skifield buildings, those areas are now pretty sterile and plantless. The same kind of thing happens on the Remarkables ski field. Hares are pretty hard on Ranunculus seed as well.
 

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #44 on: January 29, 2009, 10:00:50 AM »
I am now back home after my trip to Nelson. This particular buttercup, Ranunculus insignis grows prolifically up there. I saw many plants that were new to me and and encountered a diverse range of vegetation and landscapes.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

 

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