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Author Topic: NZ Field Trips 2009  (Read 33527 times)

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #60 on: February 11, 2009, 11:57:38 AM »
Many thanks David,
I suspected as much about the silty layer, but always supposed that this would be reasonably fluid and sand-like in its consistency - without the addition of the 'cement' (quote - 'a bit like concrete') in fact?
An excess of moisture would therefore probably run off the scree (through the rocky exterior) rather than be absorbed by that immediate area?
The plants have obviously adapted to the possibility of decapitation by rolling detritus - very short life expectation and plenty of seeds - I am still encouraged to keep trying ... I love a challenge.
Many thanks.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Lesley Cox

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #61 on: February 11, 2009, 08:32:33 PM »
Super plants and pics. I love the Lignocarpa especially since it's no longer caller Stellaria :D or "chickweed."

Some seeds arrived in yesterday's post Dave, for us to share. I'll send off half today. Many thanks Diane.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

t00lie

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #62 on: February 12, 2009, 08:37:05 AM »
Thanks Lesley(and Diane).

Lesley i didn't realize that the Lignocarpa had once been called Stellaria.

I went looking at my reference books and the only name change i can find is in Philipson and Hearns 1962 book of 'Rock Garden Plants Of The Southern Alps' where the plant was previously known as Anisotome carnosula.

All good fun these name changes,(not!!).

Cliff thank you for your kind words --i also think it is growable --i just have to find someone who has had success --smile.

Cheers dave. 

Dave Toole.  Invercargill.Bottom of the South Island New Zealand .Zone 9--Maritime climate .1100mm rainfall PA.

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #63 on: February 12, 2009, 08:48:27 AM »
Lesley,

Lignocarpa was never called Stelleria.  It was formerly known as Anisotome carnulosa and belongs to the family Apiaceae (Carrot family). Stelleria roughii the plant you are confusing it with is still Stellaria roughii and is a member of the family Caryophyllaceae and is still a chickweed.

For the record the name was changed in 1967!
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #64 on: February 12, 2009, 08:57:53 AM »
Stellaria roughii is, in itself, a little charmer and presents yet another challenge to keep in cultivation.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #65 on: February 12, 2009, 09:50:32 AM »
I have a few more pictures from Mt Arthur to post.

While we are on the subject of chickweeds here is another one, Colobanthus masonae ( ID keyed from photo so I hope it is correct). It is growing in a natural crevice garden.

Picture 2 is an Epilobium growing on a limestone outcrop. I am not prepared to give it a species name.

Picture 3 is a general view of the vegetation showing the snow tussocks with various herbaceous plants (Celmisias and Aciphyllas) growing on the limestone outcrops.

Picture 4 is a view across to the Mt Arthur Tableland.

At this stage the mist and rain were stating to blow over. The summit of the mountain is obscured by the mist but you can see the glacier carved topography. The rock is predominantly limestone/marble. All the drainage goes down into sinkholes. There is an extensive cave system underneath the mountain. (Picture 5).

Picture 6 is a second view of the mountain.  If you look carefully you can see a party descending from the summit on the left.

Picture 7 shows a plant of Raoulia rubra. The plants were all growing on a rock outcrop that was not limestone.

Picture 8 shows a colony of Raoulia rubra.

Picture 9 shows the detail of the Raoulia cushion There are a few red flowers on the top left of the picture. The red flowers give this species its name.

Picture 10 is Ourisia lactea ( I am presuming it is this species: the references I am using are not completely current).
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #66 on: February 12, 2009, 09:56:41 AM »
Superb stuff, David ... lovely celmisias and aciphyllas in the third image ... awaiting more with relish please.
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #67 on: February 12, 2009, 10:01:43 AM »
David ... from this great distance I would instantly have labelled the epilobium as E. glabellum ... what makes you doubt it please?
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #68 on: February 12, 2009, 10:04:24 AM »
Spot the difference, Pictures of Lignocarpa and Stellaria taken on the same scree at the same time.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #69 on: February 12, 2009, 10:09:25 AM »
Great stuff once again David !  :o

Cool plants from a cool part of the world  8)
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #70 on: February 12, 2009, 10:13:18 AM »
Cliff,

I am happy to accept Epilobium glabellum now you have pointed it out to me. Epilobium is a genus I find confusing as there are rather a lot of them.

Thanks Luc - it got a bit cool that afternoon on the mountain.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Lvandelft

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #71 on: February 12, 2009, 03:50:51 PM »
Cliff,

I am happy to accept Epilobium glabellum now you have pointed it out to me. Epilobium is a genus I find confusing as there are rather a lot of them.
Beautiful pictures again David.
We used to grow a plant Epilobium glabellum with white flowers and I never saw any seeds,
(that's what I remember but might be wrong)
I have since never seen that plant again. It reached about 20 cm and the flowers where standing upright
like your pink one.
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

Paddy Tobin

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #72 on: February 12, 2009, 04:59:43 PM »
David,

Magnificent countryside and fabulous flowers. Many thanks.

Paddy
Paddy Tobin, Waterford, Ireland

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Lesley Cox

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #73 on: February 12, 2009, 08:37:34 PM »
Thanks gents. As soon as I turned off the computer and started to do dishes, I had doubts. Another (serious) senior moment. You are right of course and I am wrong. My apologies.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #74 on: February 12, 2009, 10:09:35 PM »
Hi Paddy, Luit,

I am pleased you enjoyed the pictures from Mt Arthur. Epilobiums tend to produce a lot of seed and become weeds in rock gardens so despite their attractiveness I avoid growing them.

The next set of picture are of the Thousand Acre Plateau between the Matiri Valley and the Mokihinui Valley. The Matiri River is a tributary of the Buller River which flows into the sea  at Westport on the West Coast. The Mokihinui river reaches the sea north of Westport. The Thousand Acre Plateau is a bit like Conan Doyle's lost world but without the exotic menagerie and consequently the entertainment. So, sorry no Pterodactyls. This trip was a family affair with my wife Belinda and brother Ian.

We walked up the valley to Lake Matiri where we stayed at the the lake Matiri hut.

Picture 1 is a view of Lake Matiri looking down the valley.

Picture 2 is a view up the valley

Picture 3 is the last flat land we saw until we reached the plateau. The route to the plateau goes up a steep spur on the right of the photo.

Pictures 4 and 5 are views down the Matiri Valley from  the halfway point to the plateau.

Picture 6 is a view across the valley. The tree in the foreground with red flowers is the Southern rata (meterosideros umbellata)

Picture 7 is a view of the plateau rim. The route goes up through the tongue of forest on the right of the  limestone bluffs on the far left end.

Picture 8 is a view of the back down the track towards a large rata tree.

Picture 9 is a view of the forest on the upper part of the track. The terrain is somewhat chaotic at this point with large boulders that have fallen off the bluffs above with fallen trees etc. The track was a bit on the steep side as well.

Picture 10 is a view of the interior of the beech forest.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

 

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