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Author Topic: NZ Field Trips 2009  (Read 33488 times)

Paddy Tobin

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #105 on: February 17, 2009, 09:01:39 PM »
Doug,

A great set of photographs, brilliant flowers. Many thanks, really enjoyed viewing them.

"Penwiper", that's a very odd name. How did it come to be so named?

Paddy
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Lvandelft

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #106 on: February 17, 2009, 09:05:01 PM »
As for the Pratia macrodon, it does grow in dense mats up there. The lower basins were covered and the scent was divine. You could smell them from the car park!
Doug, a plant with so many advantages should be taken in culture!
I only know Pratia angulata, but don't if it has any scent. Never tried.
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

kiwi

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #107 on: February 18, 2009, 04:50:45 AM »
Hi Paddy - Quoted from Lawrie Metcalf's book, Alpine plants of New Zealand.
"The penwiper was named as it resembles an old fashioned, victorian cloth pen-wiper, formerly used to wipe ink from the nib pens used in those days."
There you go!

Hi Lvandelft, I will ask around to see anyone has had luck with Pratia macrodon in the garden, I would love to give it a shot, I'll have to see how it goes from seed.
Doug Logan, Canterbury NZ.

kiwi

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #108 on: February 18, 2009, 05:06:19 AM »
Why we're on the hybrids, heres one of my favourates.
Raoulia loganii (Leucogenes leontopodium x Raoulia rubra)
Seems to be doing great in my garden, though it needs rain protection through the winter.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2009, 05:07:59 AM by kiwi »
Doug Logan, Canterbury NZ.

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #109 on: February 18, 2009, 08:17:58 AM »
Hi Doug,

Pratia macrodon is now Lobelia macrodon. A second species Lobelia glaberrima that is very similar has been described.  They differ in details of the flower that of Lobelia macrodon being larger and more showy. Lobelia glaberrima has a more southern distribution than Lobelia macrodon so you are unlikely to see it in Canterbury.
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #110 on: February 18, 2009, 08:56:10 AM »
Stunning Raoulia loganii Doug !  :o
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

David Lyttle

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #111 on: February 18, 2009, 09:32:35 AM »
Here is my posting for tonight some alpines from the Thousand Acres Plateau.

Pimelea gnidia flowers
Pimelea gnidia Shrub in full flower
Helichrysum intermedium (white flowered form) This species is extremely variable with some forms having yellow flowers.
Helichrysum intermedium flowers.
Myosotis species (possibly a local endemic)
Craspedia lanata
Celmisia lateralis
Dolichoglottis lyallii
Hebe epacridea
An Epilobium species. This particular species has the largest flowers of any Epilobium I have ever seen. It is a stunning plant but I do not know its name.
The Epilobium is Epilobium vernicosum. It is allied to Epilobium glabellum but is found on base-rich rock.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2009, 02:25:56 AM by David Lyttle »
David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, South Island ,
New Zealand.

ranunculus

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #112 on: February 18, 2009, 10:18:30 AM »
An Epilobium species. This particular species has the largest flowers of any Epilobium I have ever seen. It is a stunning plant but I do not know its name.

Absolutely beautiful, David ... could almost be Dryas octopetala blooms ...
Cliff Booker
Behind a camera in Whitworth. Lancashire. England.

Gerdk

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #113 on: February 18, 2009, 01:02:57 PM »
Indeed, fantastic! Flowers as big as our native weedy Epilobium angustifolium!
Gerd
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Lesley Cox

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #114 on: February 18, 2009, 07:02:38 PM »
Pratia (Lobelia) macrodon does indeed make a very good cultivated plant, in garden or pot. It is so tight-growing and hugs the ground as closely as a skin. Someone needs to collect seed for the AGS and SRGC seed lists.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Lvandelft

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #115 on: February 18, 2009, 08:24:26 PM »
Pratia (Lobelia) macrodon does indeed make a very good cultivated plant, in garden or pot. It is so tight-growing and hugs the ground as closely as a skin. Someone needs to collect seed for the AGS and SRGC seed lists.
So I spotted a good garden plant Lesley.
Be glad I am not there in the mountains. ;D ;D
I am sure I would have problems resisting taking a cutting or two.
I believe the same with the Epilobium sp. That is a real beauty.
Here in Holland many NZ plants are difficult to keep, but these would have a chance.
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Sadly Luit died on 14th October 2016 - happily we can still enjoy his posts to the Forum

cohan

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #116 on: February 23, 2009, 04:24:57 AM »
Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

What a lovely little viola.

i agree--interestingly enough, we have one here that is very similar looking!
i presume it to be V renifolia, but not certain--here is a shot from last may, this is a tiny thing, no more than a couple of inches high..
cohan

cohan

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #117 on: February 23, 2009, 05:20:56 AM »
* Saw some fabulous plants ---particularly this wonderful specialized scree plant in flower --Lignocarpa carnosula --it's congested leaves remind me somewhat of deers antlers .
Cheers Dave.

wow wow! seriously cool!
cohan

cohan

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #118 on: February 23, 2009, 05:42:31 AM »
Spot the difference, Pictures of Lignocarpa and Stellaria taken on the same scree at the same time.

another wow! much nicer than the average chickweed around here, even though we do have some pretty flowers and cute fuzzy leaves...lol

Gerdk

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Re: NZ Field Trips 2009
« Reply #119 on: February 23, 2009, 07:58:07 AM »






Gerd
Here is another close up of the Viola taken on Sunday.
It has a wide range throughout most of NZ .

What a lovely little viola.

i agree--interestingly enough, we have one here that is very similar looking!
i presume it to be V renifolia, but not certain--here is a shot from last may, this is a tiny thing, no more than a couple of inches high..
cohan

Thank you Cohan!
Pretty little thing - I guess renifolia is right.

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

 

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