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Author Topic: Troughs  (Read 87095 times)

ruweiss

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Troughs
« on: May 09, 2009, 09:15:36 PM »
I was always impressed by alpine plants grown in troughs and sinks, so it was only logical
to create my own ones. There was a lot to learn, because many plants are simply not
suitable for this kind of gardening. In my experience small Sempervivum species, especially
S. arachnoideum are very usefull for filling the narrow gaps. Only very slow growing shrubs
will do it for a longer time without overgrowing smaller neighbours, good are smaller Daphnes
and dwarf willows. The smaller witches brooms of Tsuga canadensis are also very good
for this purpose.
The most decorative containers are of course real old troughs and sinks, next are replicas
from real stone or hypertufa,but every other container is suitable;even an old grinding stone
can be used.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Maggi Young

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2009, 09:23:35 PM »
Wonderful troughs, Rudi!  8)
What a fine example to anyone who thinks they have no room for a garden ; get a trough and grow a perfect miniature landscape :D
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!


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Lvandelft

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2009, 11:10:20 PM »
Thank you for showing, Rudi. I see some very nice planting combinations, which survived many years.
Gives me some more inspiration, to start planting my (many) empty troughs at last.
Luit van Delft, right in the heart of the beautiful flowerbulb district, Noordwijkerhout, Holland.

Viola

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2009, 07:42:28 AM »
They have troughs planted wonderfully beautifully Rudi. congratulations
Karl
Karl-Austria

Ragged Robin

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2009, 09:33:36 AM »
These are some of the most artistic garden troughs I have ever seen - congratulations and admiration Rudi  :o

Your diversity of plants in troughs growing so harmoniously together, intertwining and clinging to the rocks, looks like a living canvas.  As Maggi says anyone with a small space or awkward space could benefit from your inspiration.  I have for one  ;D
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 09:36:38 AM by Ragged Robin »
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

annew

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2009, 10:20:28 AM »
Beautiful trough planting, especially the waterfall of Sempervivum, but you need to watch out for the snails!
MINIONS! I need more minions!
Anne Wright, Yorkshire, England

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Gerdk

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2009, 12:04:16 PM »
I don't know what to admire most - the troughs (especially the first one) or the
plants chosen for growing inside them! Really a source of inspiration.

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Lori S.

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2009, 04:26:33 PM »
Gorgeous troughs!! :D
Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

ChrisB

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2009, 05:45:25 PM »
These troughs are truly inspiring.  It takes a lot of artistry to create something special.  Wish I had that amount of talent.  Thanks so much for sharing with us.
Chris Boulby
Northumberland, England

Lesley Cox

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2009, 11:16:16 PM »
A superb selection of troughs Rudi. Everyone a masterpiece both in design and planting. A real inspiration.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

ruweiss

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2009, 09:03:04 PM »
Dear friends, many thanks for the kind comments. If you plan to plant
your own troughs so keep in mind that it takes sometimes a long time
until the planting gives the display you desire. Usually snails and slugs
are no bigger problem than in the open garden if you control them with slug
pellets or by the biological way. Those in my garden seem to be real
gourmets, their favourite menue are all Campanulaceae, especially
Physoplexis comosa and mostly refuse Sempervivums and Saxifragas.
Rudi Weiss,Waiblingen,southern Germany,
climate zone 8a,elevation 250 m

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2009, 09:30:01 PM »
A series of truly wonderful troughs you have Rudi !
Wunderschön gemacht !!
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

Gerdk

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2009, 09:25:40 PM »
Here are some shots from today - the Dianthus  growing in a trough - the Campanula not - but in a similar condition

1. and 2. Dianthus subacaulis (?)- originally from Mt. Ventoux
3. Dianthus microlepis ssp. musalae
4. Campanula aucheri

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Ragged Robin

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2009, 10:28:25 AM »
Here are some shots from today - the Dianthus  growing in a trough - the Campanula not - but in a similar condition

1. and 2. Dianthus subacaulis (?)- originally from Mt. Ventoux
3. Dianthus microlepis ssp. musalae
4. Campanula aucheri

Gerd
A really pretty Dianthus subacaulis, Gerd, was it grown from seed collected from Mt Ventoux?

I love the deep blue bells of the Campanula aucheri - where does it come from?
Valais, Switzerland - 1,200 metres - Continental climate - rocks and moraine

Gerdk

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Re: Troughs
« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2009, 12:36:01 PM »

A really pretty Dianthus subacaulis, Gerd, was it grown from seed collected from Mt Ventoux?

I love the deep blue bells of the Campanula aucheri - where does it come from?

Thank you! Yes, the Dianthus was raised from seeds from the site mentioned.

The Campanula species is from the Caucasus mountains - the plant itself from a
German nursery.

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

 

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