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Author Topic: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....  (Read 65443 times)

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #375 on: April 01, 2012, 11:21:12 PM »
Tim, the best way to grow the wonderful peas is to wring the moisture out of your climate.  If I can get them through the spring they tend to do OK because we can have long periods here of heat and drought.  They revel in that but I'll never get them to look the way Utah and Colorado growers can.
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #376 on: April 18, 2012, 02:13:23 PM »
Everything in the garden is almost a month ahead in bloom and the crevice gardens have started to bloom.  The last picture shows the back side of the cliff with some of the microphlox in bloom in natural crevices.  Almost everything that has been planted in these natural crevices (some 40 plants), has come through our snowless winter with only three losses so far.  I know this is a really nice group so I thank you in advance for not laughing at the picture of Eritrichium howardii with two blooms.  As of yesterday the count had doubled with many more buds to open.  This really is my favorite area of the garden.
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #377 on: April 18, 2012, 02:15:03 PM »
Sorry, there seems to be some difficulty in posting pictures right now.  I'll try posting one by one.

Eritrichium howardii
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 02:34:19 PM by Maggi Young »
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #378 on: April 18, 2012, 02:20:12 PM »
Here's more.

 Androsace villosa
 Oxytropis multiceps
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 02:35:10 PM by Maggi Young »
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #379 on: April 18, 2012, 02:22:00 PM »
More plants in the crevice garden

 Daphne velenovskyi 'Balkan Rose'
 Hymenoxys acaulis v caespitosa
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 02:38:27 PM by Maggi Young »
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #380 on: April 18, 2012, 02:24:37 PM »
A few more plants.

DSC06152 -scree view

Onosma albo-roseum


« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 02:37:52 PM by Maggi Young »
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #381 on: April 18, 2012, 02:26:20 PM »
And the last.

Astragalus utahensis
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 02:37:28 PM by Maggi Young »
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

Maggi Young

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #382 on: April 18, 2012, 02:39:55 PM »
Great to see your garden waking up so well, Anne. Thanks for persevering with uploading the pix   :-*
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Worry is like a rocking chair, it will give you something to do but it won't get you anywhere.
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Luc Gilgemyn

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #383 on: April 18, 2012, 04:25:56 PM »
Fantastic pix Anne !  :o :o  Your scree view is sooooooooooo realistic !!
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

David Nicholson

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #384 on: April 18, 2012, 06:52:43 PM »
Lovely set of pictures Anne. Wish I had your "artistic" touch with rock.
David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b
more enthusiasm than skill-but learning

Tim Ingram

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #385 on: April 18, 2012, 07:20:48 PM »
It's glorious to see those peas! I have just spent a couple of days (well in between a few other things) chipping legume seed using a magnifying lamp my wife has for embroidery. They include Astragalus utahensis and Oxytropis multiceps, and if I manage to grow them anywhere near as well as your photos I shall be well pleased.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com

Lesley Cox

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #386 on: April 18, 2012, 10:33:10 PM »
Anne, I love your turn of phrase - "wring the moisture out of your climate." It says so much about needed conditions and is great creative writing as well.

And of course I love the plants in their habitat. That must be the nearest to a real mountain scree that could be found in a garden. You are so fortunate to have this.

Tim, must the pea seeds be chipped? Would an overnight soak in (starting as) hot water not soften the coats enough to let germination start?
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #387 on: April 18, 2012, 10:40:58 PM »
Lesley, I am indeed fortunate and I know it.  It's worth all the effort to enhance a lovely habitat.  It would, however, be nice to put the garden on a stick and elevate it a few thousand to get away from the humidity+ heat of the summer.
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #388 on: April 18, 2012, 10:46:12 PM »
Luc, the reason it looks so realistic is because it's real.  I just cleaned out the natural crevices and put in rock chocks where needed to prevent the plants from sliding downhill every rain storm.  It takes time for the roots to get anchored.  I'd love to take the credit but I can't.  The flat crevice work is mine.
Tim, Astragalus utahensis and Oxytropis are not only lovely peas, but they are among the easier ones and have a good life span in the garden if the weather cooperates reasonably.  It seems to be difficult to get them to form viable seeds or even pods in my climate.  That's where Alan Bradshaw's "Alplains Seed Catalog" comes to the rescue.  His seeds germ inate very well and he has plants no one else seems to have.
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

astragalus

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Re: Crevice Gardening ......in defence of rock.....
« Reply #389 on: April 20, 2012, 10:20:48 PM »
Work is continuing on "The Last Outcrop".  I'm busy making soil with half-rotted chips as a component.  Adding top soil (fairly neutral) and some sand rounds it out.  A slow-release fertilizer is added at planting.  So far, I've planted epimediums, hellebores (including "ivory prince" and "pepperminy ice" - this last is one of Marietta O'Byrnes hybrids), haberleas, dodecatheons, anemonopsis, hepaticas etc.  There will be another round of soil mixing, grading . firming and planting tomorrow.  Most of the plants have just been dug up from elsewhere in the garden with the exception of two named hellebores.  The chips sat all winter and since there was no snow cover I was able to trample them down daily.  I'm trying to remember to take pictures and have a record, something I usually forget to do.
Steep, rocky and cold in the
Hudson River Valley in New York State

 

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