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Author Topic: Kwekerij De Schullhorn  (Read 10823 times)

Lesley Cox

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #90 on: July 18, 2010, 09:43:51 PM »
That's a delightful little Albuca Wim, very like what I have as Albuca humilis. Originally it came to me as Albuca species, Basutoland. It has a lovely, quite heavy almond paste scent. Is this one scented too?

A fabulous Ixia, especially in such quantity. Luit showed it recently at the Lisse Flower Show and I thought then it was very good.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Wim de Goede

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #91 on: July 21, 2010, 05:49:02 PM »
Yes Leley our Albuca humilis is also fragrance I got it from Gerben Tjeersma from the botanical garden gotenborg, so I think we have the same Albuca

Wim

Wim de Goede

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #92 on: May 02, 2011, 06:57:44 PM »
A Gold Medal for this collection

1  Collection; Ixia panaculata Eos; Dichelostemma No D-01-01-08;Muscari Venus; Mascari Maxabel; Narcis assoanus; N Little Flick; N No N-01-01-08

2  In the middle Narcis No N-01-01-08 (triandrus x Hybrid)
     Left            ,,    ,, Little Flick
     Right          ,,    ,,  assoanus

David Nicholson

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #93 on: May 02, 2011, 07:12:38 PM »
Very nice Wim.


Your Narcissus N-01-01-08 looks a lot like N. 'Pipit' to me. I like 'Little Flick'
David Nicholson
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TheOnionMan

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #94 on: May 07, 2011, 03:28:34 AM »
Are all of the Narcissus leaves cut off? The potted specimens have an initial stark appearance to them, then I realized there was no foliage.
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at charter.net

Maggi Young

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #95 on: May 07, 2011, 11:13:55 AM »
Are all of the Narcissus leaves cut off? The potted specimens have an initial stark appearance to them, then I realized there was no foliage.

The pots are of cut blooms, MacMark, not plants .
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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TheOnionMan

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #96 on: May 07, 2011, 12:10:54 PM »
Are all of the Narcissus leaves cut off? The potted specimens have an initial stark appearance to them, then I realized there was no foliage.

The pots are of cut blooms, MacMark, not plants .

Oh, my mistake, I thought it was similar to the practice with some show plants I've seen of Allium species, where the leaves are totally cut off leaving just the flower stems.  I see that my name is of Scottish origin now ;)

By the way Wim, my plants of Allium Cameleon are budded.  I shared a couple bulbs with another Allium aficionado, so that we can both try to determine what is the underlying species with this cultivar.

McMark
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 07:26:21 PM by TheOnionMan »
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
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antennaria at charter.net

Maggi Young

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #97 on: May 07, 2011, 01:10:06 PM »
A typo, McMark, though I may have been subliminally affected by all the political hoo haa that surrounds us  in the wake of Thursday's elections ;D;)
We do think of you, though, as one of us! ;)
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Worry is like a rocking chair, it will give you something to do but it won't get you anywhere.
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Wim de Goede

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #98 on: May 10, 2011, 06:44:06 PM »
Thank you Maggi for explaning how we show the bulbs flowers in Spring, yes Mark Allium Cameleon is almost in flower I think I will show them coming Monday in Lisse
Wim

TheOnionMan

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #99 on: May 27, 2011, 01:18:55 PM »
Wim, my bulbs of Allium 'Cameleon' are blooming.  My opinion was, and remains the same, this cannot possibly be an American species (no North American species has hairy leaves), it is most certainly a member of the Molium section of Allium, mostly centered around Mediterranean areas.  As usual, it is possible to "narrow the field" to a few possibilities, but I do believe the species is Allium longanum Pampanini, a species closely related to A. roseum, subhirsutum, neapolitanum, and trifoliatum.  The species is native to North Africa (Libya to Egypt), Crete and the Cyclades. It has 3-4 clasping basal leaves up to 20 mm wide, with hairs along the leaf margins and the leaves hirsute near the base. 

In my plants, the flower color is white with pink midveins, taking on a pinkish tone when maturing, not nearly as colorful looking as in your photo back 1 page in this thread (the photo labeled as Allium Eos).

A few photos of my plant blooming now, and a line drawing from "A Revision of the Genus Allium L. (Liliaceae) in Africa by Brigitta E. De Wilde-Duyfjes, dept of plant taxonomy , Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

It should be noted that this species is rarely pictured, thus difficult to find much to reference the species, but the 237-page reference noted above is outstanding for covering Allium in North Africa (which by proxy and natural distributional range, covers many Mediterranean species, with excellent line drawings and synonymy on each).

Update:  searching for an ID determination and going through keys again, now with more mature plants in bloom, going back and forth between the A. longanum & A. trifoliatum possibities, I have arrived at my final word on this:  It is Allium trifoliatum.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2012, 02:15:04 AM by TheOnionMan »
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at charter.net

Wim de Goede

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #100 on: May 28, 2011, 03:24:58 PM »
Thank you Mark for your explenation  and maybe you are ride  but we have the growing rides on it as A Cameleon and we already market on that name and we will continion do that that.

Wim

TheOnionMan

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #101 on: May 28, 2011, 03:38:47 PM »
Thank you Mark for your explenation  and maybe you are ride  but we have the growing rides on it as A Cameleon and we already market on that name and we will continion do that that.

Wim

That's fine, I was not questioning the cultivar name... just trying to discover what the "underlying" species is.  Knowing that the species is A. longanum (or the more distant possibility of it being A. trifoliatum) will give customers and gardeners interested in growing this selection, some clues as to hardiness and cultivation.  I'm still waiting for my flowering plants to turn as deep pink as in your photos, but if it stays more white here, then maybe the climate is making a difference.
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at charter.net

Wim de Goede

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #102 on: May 29, 2011, 07:01:43 PM »
Mark the deep pink is not A. Cameleon but A. Eros I though I told you before because I made a mistake with lable, sorry
Wim

TheOnionMan

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Re: Kwekerij De Schullhorn
« Reply #103 on: May 30, 2011, 01:45:35 AM »
Mark the deep pink is not A. Cameleon but A. Eros I though I told you before because I made a mistake with lable, sorry
Wim


Wim, I'm trying to follow the logic of our previous discussion... you showed a photo as Allium Eos  (typo for Eros) of a nice pink allium and when I asked about the name Allium Eos, you said the photo is really of Allium Cameleon... but now you're telling me the opposite. I'm totally confused.  Could you post a photo of Allium 'Eros' and 'Cameleon' to clear the confusion.  Are they both forms of the same species (Allium longanum)?

Here is the photo you posted as Allium Eos, which in the messages that followed you said was in fact Allium Cameleon.
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5164.msg153884#msg153884

Here you said you made a mistake, the plant pictured is Allium Cameleon
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=5164.msg154089#msg154089
Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA (near the New Hampshire border)
USDA Zone 5
antennaria at charter.net