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Author Topic: Crocus October 2007  (Read 35985 times)

Andrew

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #150 on: October 24, 2007, 02:30:43 PM »
Crocus pallasii subsp. dispathaceus

33047-0

33049-1

Crocus thomasii

33051-2

33053-3
Andrew, North Cambridgeshire, England.

mark smyth

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #151 on: October 24, 2007, 06:21:14 PM »
tomasii is a lovely looking Crocus.

So how white is white?

Here is pulchellus 'Zephyr' (L), pulchellus 'Alba' (M) and goulimyi 'Alba'

All my pulchellus 'Alba' have stunted styles
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

David Shaw

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #152 on: October 24, 2007, 07:27:34 PM »
Another sunny day in Scotland and opportunity to admire some more crocus.
Crocus biflorus melantherus showing markings beneath the petals
Crocus biflorus melantherus with a delicious yellow throat and 'not very' black anthers. Will the black develop with age? (I see now, it is covered in pollen. Come on little bee)
Crocus serotinus salzmanii
Crocus serotinus salzmanii with pollinator (it is so a bee). Note all the pollen splattered on the petals.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 07:31:08 PM by David Shaw »
David Shaw, Forres, Moray, Scotland

Maggi Young

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #153 on: October 24, 2007, 07:32:14 PM »
Nice bee there, David!
 

The black anthers of Crocus biflorus melantherus are actually black at first, turning golden as they dehisce. This is the case in some other plants with black anthers, though, of course, I cannot for the life of me think of any right this minute  :-[
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

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mark smyth

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #154 on: October 24, 2007, 08:16:27 PM »
Some Geraniums and Hemerocallis
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

hadacekf

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #155 on: October 24, 2007, 08:17:59 PM »
I think Crocus pulchelus has an inclination for such unusual blooms but it is not stable.
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

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Lesley Cox

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #156 on: October 24, 2007, 09:02:20 PM »
These are lovely Franz, very "acceptable" doubles, compared with many.
Lesley Cox - near Dunedin, lower east coast, South Island of New Zealand - Zone 9

Maggi Young

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #157 on: October 24, 2007, 09:06:03 PM »
I agree, Lesley and so well pictured, also.
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Worry is like a rocking chair, it will give you something to do but it won't get you anywhere.
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

mark smyth

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #158 on: October 24, 2007, 09:19:11 PM »
I'm with the other two. When does Franz ever show a dud photo!?

Can I mention a pet hate here or do I go for a moan?
Antrim, Northern Ireland Z8
www.snowdropinfo.com / www.marksgardenplants.com / www.saveourswifts.co.uk

When the swifts arrive empty the green house

All photos taken with a Canon 900T and 230

Maggi Young

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #159 on: October 24, 2007, 09:57:41 PM »
No, Mark, go for a moan !
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Worry is like a rocking chair, it will give you something to do but it won't get you anywhere.
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Martin Baxendale

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #160 on: October 24, 2007, 10:00:39 PM »
Franz, I think you're right - Crocus pulchellus is inclined to throw double flowers which later return to singles. I've had two instances of just that in my garden in different years. Of course I carefully selected them both out only to find the next year they were singles again!  :-\
Martin Baxendale, Gloucestershire, UK.

hadacekf

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #161 on: October 25, 2007, 02:42:05 PM »
Mark, I hope not at any time!
Franz Hadacek  Vienna  Austria

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Boyed

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #162 on: October 27, 2007, 11:50:21 AM »
I take a month vacation to plant my tulips and am rarely in the internet lately. So I see I miss lots of interersting dicussions.
I have some wonderful photos I 'd like to share.
One of my favourite corocuses -
crocus niveus bicolour form, which has lots of decorative features- special beauty and nice colour combination, good sizes (including the corm size), strong tube and firm constitution of petals, being floriferous (one corm produces more than 5 blooms), long lasting qualities, high increasing rate, etc
Once (3 years ago) I had only 3 flowering-sized corms, but now I have more than 30. I think my growing method proves to be effective for crocuses. I harvest them annualy, each year plant in a fresh rich leafy soil, use very large and deep pots, during winter keep under the temperature from +3 to +10 C, etc. And I should mention that I don't use any fertilizers at all.
Zhirair, Tulip collector, bulb enthusiast
Vanadzor, ARMENIA

Boyed

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #163 on: October 27, 2007, 12:14:38 PM »
Tony,
thanks for your useful tips and pictures relating viruses. This topic is very interesting for me and I have been studying viruses during all my gardening experience making lots of different tests and experiments to understand their nature. Now I can easily identify any virus-infected samples, even the ones that cought virus ricently and in which the simptoms are not so easily observed. I also infect some crocus cultivars with virus on a purpose to see how each varietiy or species behaves itself when infected. My experiments started with tulips and continued with crocuses.
I would like to add also some information relating virus mosaic. The samples infected with virus mosaic during some period of time (after flowering, during vegetation) can have some brown stripes on their leaves as if the leaves were slightly burnt. You are deffinately right, mosaic infected plants rarely can also have slightly destorted flowers, which I mentioned during my growing experience.

Your comparison picture of crocus speciousus and colchicum 'Rosy Dawn' is very impressive. My crocus speciosus 'Pambak' also grows very tall up to 26 cm, but has flowers slightly smaller than those of 'Oxonian'. But in my opinion, it has very serious bonus camparing to some Dutch cultivars - very strong tubes.
Zhirair, Tulip collector, bulb enthusiast
Vanadzor, ARMENIA

Boyed

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Re: Crocus October 2007
« Reply #164 on: October 27, 2007, 12:32:13 PM »
Tony,
I always enjoy your crocus pictures very much. You show many interesting species, cultivars and variations. Your crocus niveus forms look quite nice.
Your crocus niveus white form is blooming now and it resembles the ones shown in your pics. Some of my samles also have slight lilac flush. They have normal sizes, equalling to crocus goulimyi by height and flowers size. In general I liked them, but they have one serious shortcoming - flowers are not long lasting, they last only for 2-3 days. Anyway, thanks a lot for that beauty. Here are the pics.

The seedlings are about to bloom. I will show the pics as soon as possible.

P.C. I would very appriciate if you place a pic of your crocus niveus white largest form, especially a comaprison picture if avalable. I am especially interested how large the flowers are.
Zhirair, Tulip collector, bulb enthusiast
Vanadzor, ARMENIA