We hope you have enjoyed the SRGC Forum. You can make a Paypal donation to the SRGC by clicking the above button

Author Topic: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere  (Read 12195 times)

WimB

  • always digs deeper...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2025
  • Country: be
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #45 on: May 03, 2012, 08:56:26 PM »
Here first time flowering in the garden (had some flowers before in pots ) : Ranunculus seguieri.

Superb, Kris! Love that Ranunculus!!!
Wim Boens - Administrator website VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Flemish Rock Garden society (VRV): http://www.vrvforum.be/
Facebook page VRV: http://www.facebook.com/pages/VRV-Vlaamse-Rotsplanten-Vereniging/351755598192270

Mike Ireland

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
  • Country: england
  • Erinacea anthyllis
    • Mike Ireland's Alpine Garden
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #46 on: May 03, 2012, 09:27:25 PM »
Kris the Ranunculus seguieri are wonderful.  Not one that appears to be around so often, must search it out.
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

krisderaeymaeker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1639
  • Country: be
  • President :Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging  Flemish Rock Garden Club site and Forum
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #47 on: May 03, 2012, 09:40:59 PM »
Kris the Ranunculus seguieri are wonderful.  Not one that appears to be around so often, must search it out.

Thanks Mike ! Could find this one some years ago at Gerd Stopp's nursery . 
Kris De Raeymaeker

Belgium

krisderaeymaeker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1639
  • Country: be
  • President :Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging  Flemish Rock Garden Club site and Forum
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #48 on: May 03, 2012, 09:42:53 PM »
Superb, Kris! Love that Ranunculus!!!

Thanks Wim , I hope that it grows well for the next years . 
Kris De Raeymaeker

Belgium

WimB

  • always digs deeper...
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2025
  • Country: be
    • Vlaamse Rotsplanten Vereniging
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #49 on: May 03, 2012, 09:43:42 PM »
Thanks Wim , I hope that it grows well for the next years .

It's in very capable hands, so I'm sure it will!
Wim Boens - Administrator website VRV (Flemish Rock Garden Society) - Seed exchange manager Crocus Group
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Flemish Rock Garden society (VRV): http://www.vrvforum.be/
Facebook page VRV: http://www.facebook.com/pages/VRV-Vlaamse-Rotsplanten-Vereniging/351755598192270

Lampwick

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
  • Kai ~ My Welsh Springer Spaniel.
    • Portraits of Alpine Plants
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #50 on: May 04, 2012, 07:29:36 AM »
We have had rain, rain and more rain.
I haven’t been able to get in the garden much and the few days we have had a bit of sunshine I was other places. :-\

I can’t compete with the great pictures which have been put up recently.
Mike; That Asperula suberosa is magnificent, a real “show-stopper”, is it under cover?

Well folks, here is my meagre effort. More foliage than flowers!

Photos taken over the last three days.

Anemone nemorosa 'Robinsoniana'
Berberis x stenophylla 'Corallina Compacta'
Gaultheria (Pernettya) mucronata
Hebe pinguifolia 'Pagei'
Hebe 'Pink Elephant'
Hebe 'Silver Dollar'
Leucogenes Leontopodium
~~Lampwick~~
Staffordshire, United Kingdom. (name: John R. Husbands)

http://portraitsofalpineplants.com/

“Why don’t they have proper names?” ~ My brother-in-law.

Gerdk

  • grower of sweet violets
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2127
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #51 on: May 04, 2012, 08:50:58 AM »
Diane + Luc,
Thank you for the additional information. The delphinantha x carzorlensis cross must be an extraordinary plant - according the pics it has a whole lot of hybrid vigour.
Luc, I hope you'll inform us about the future behaviour of your gem.

Gerd
Gerd Knoche, Solingen
Germany

Zdenek

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
  • Country: cz
    • Zdenek's website
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #52 on: May 04, 2012, 10:03:29 AM »
Androsace ciliata
Callianthemum anemonoides
Ornithogalum sibthorpii
Ranunculus hybridus
Saxifraga sempervivum
Trollius laxus

Luc Gilgemyn

  • Channel Hopper
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5090
  • Country: be
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #53 on: May 04, 2012, 03:58:32 PM »
Diane + Luc,
Thank you for the additional information. The delphinantha x carzorlensis cross must be an extraordinary plant - according the pics it has a whole lot of hybrid vigour.
Luc, I hope you'll inform us about the future behaviour of your gem.

Gerd

Will do Gerd !  ;)
Luc Gilgemyn
Harelbeke - Belgium

Mike Ireland

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
  • Country: england
  • Erinacea anthyllis
    • Mike Ireland's Alpine Garden
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #54 on: May 04, 2012, 07:39:26 PM »
John
The asperula suberosa posted is growing in an unheated/open sided greenhouse.
My original plant, bought from Bob Potterton over 30 years ago is still going strong in a large piece of tufa which has always been outside in the garden.
It appears as a brownish 'clump' of tangled soft stems throughout the winter but always comes back into life,  (as Bob Potterton used to say, "like a good doer")
Photo attached from a couple of years ago.  In the garden it is again just coming into bud.
Humberston
N E Lincolnshire

brianw

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #55 on: May 04, 2012, 09:04:24 PM »
I should have some P. grandiflora seed available soon if anyone wants some. Just a few pods from 1 early plant. My main pot with several plants is not showing any buds yet. An odd year for sure. I grow most of mine frost free as I would rather have the wet trays and air in the frost free house than in with the alpines in winter and spring.
Edge of Chiltern hills, 25 miles west of London, England

olegKon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 553
  • onion farmer to the forum
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #56 on: May 04, 2012, 09:11:34 PM »
Spring is progressing
1. Sangvinaria canadensis Multiplex
2. Pulsatilla alpina
3.Jeffersonia dubia
4. Dicentra cuccularia "Pink Punk"
in Moscow

Maggi Young

  • Forum Dogsbody
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29275
  • Country: scotland
  • "There's often a clue"
    • International Rock Gardener e-magazine
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #57 on: May 04, 2012, 09:13:55 PM »
Oleg, how good it is to see how fast the plants are moving after your snow has gone.
Your Jeffersonia is much nicer than ours, I might add  - we hope that the babies from your seed will take after their parent! 8)
« Last Edit: May 04, 2012, 09:16:11 PM by Maggi Young »
Margaret Young in Aberdeen, North East Scotland Zone 7 -ish!

Worry is like a rocking chair, it will give you something to do but it won't get you anywhere.
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye."

Tim Ingram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1312
  • Country: 00
  • Umbels amongst others
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #58 on: May 05, 2012, 08:57:25 AM »
Wonderful to see so many plants. The Asperula has never grown so well for me so I shall now try it in tufa - it is one of the most beautiful alpines in flower, so fragile looking and yet so exquisite. Jeffersonia dubia really is fine!

These three plants are to do with anticipation on different scales in the garden. Yucca whipplei has been throwing up a flower spike for a couple of weeks now and is showing signs of the floral structure to come. It is still quite a young plant that I hadn't expected to flower for some time yet. Amsonia tabernaemontana is one of my favourite perennials and can have these dramatic dark shoots when it first emerges in the spring. A slow plant to establish but long lived and tidy in habit and with great autumn colour. The starry soft-blue flowers are delightful. And finally Edraianthus serpyllifolius. I haven't grown this for long but the flower buds really stand out - one of a fine genus which I have learnt more of through the Forum.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com

Tim Ingram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1312
  • Country: 00
  • Umbels amongst others
Re: May 2012 in the Northern Hemisphere
« Reply #59 on: May 05, 2012, 09:03:39 AM »
I missed out the description of the Erythronium! This is a hybrid that came from Wol and Sue Staines at Glen Chantry and has done very well in semi-shade under dwarf apples (probably helped by liberal supplies of good home made compost). I am not sure of the parentage.
Dr. Timothy John Ingram. Nurseryman & gardener with strong interest in plants of Mediterranean-type climates and dryland alpines. Garden in Kent, UK. www.coptonash.plus.com